Centres of Research Excellence (CoREs)

The Centres of Research Excellence (CoREs) Fund are inter-institutional research networks, with researchers working together on commonly agreed work programmes.

The University will host or co-host five CoREs until 2020:

  • The Maurice Wilkins Centre
  • Brain Research New Zealand/ Rangahau Roro Aotearoa
  • Medical Technologies
  • Te Pūnaha Matatini
  • Ngā Pae o te Maramatanga – New Zealand’s Indigenous Centre of Research Excellence

The University also contributes to four further CoRES:

  • The Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonic and Quantum Technologies, hosted by the University of Otago
  • MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, hosted by Victoria University of Wellington
  • QuakeCore: Centre for Earthquake Resilience, hosted by University of Canterbury
  • Riddet Institute, hosted by Massey University.

CoRES were established in 2001 to encourage excellent tertiary education-based research that is collaborative, strategically focused and creates significant knowledge transfer activities. They build research capacity and capabilities through post-graduate programmes and the training of new researchers.

Funding is fully contestable and is managed by the Tertiary Education Commission.

The Maurice Wilkins Centre


Hosted by the University of Auckland in partnership with the universities of Otago, Canterbury, Victoria, and Waikato, and the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research.

Director: Professor Rod Dunbar

The Centre specifically targets three groups of diseases that pose grave threats to New Zealand society – cancer, diabetes and infectious disease.  

Maurice Wilkins Centre

Brain Research New Zealand/Rangahau Roro Aotearoa


Co-hosted by the University of Auckland and the University of Otago, in partnership with Auckland University of Technology and the University of Canterbury.

Co-Directors: Distinguished Professor Richard Faull, University of Auckland, and Professor Cliff Abraham, University of Otago

This new CoRE, established in 2015, aims to unlock the secrets of the ageing brain. It will unlock the secrets of the ageing brain, and develop new therapies and better clinical and community care to enhance brain health throughout life for all New Zealanders.

 Research focuses on intervention and treatments for neurodegenerative disorders of the ageing brain, such as dementia, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Huntington’s disease.

Brain Research New Zealand

Medical Technologies


Hosted by the University of Auckland in partnership with the universities of Canterbury, Otago and Victoria, Callaghan Innovation and AUT.

Director: Distinguished Professor Peter Hunter

The Centre uses bioengineering technologies to develop novel bio-instrumentation and computational physiological models, and design innovative medical devices and technologies to improve healthcare and create economic opportunities for New Zealand companies.

MedTech

Te Pūnaha Matatini


Hosted by the University of Auckland in partnership with Massey University, Victoria University of Wellington, University of Canterbury, and Motu Public Policy and Economics Research.

Director: Professor Shaun Hendy

This is a new CoRE, established in 2015. It aims to develop methods and tools for transforming complex data into knowledge for better decision-making. Research themes include complex data analytics, complex economic and social systems, and complexity and the biosphere.

Te Pūnaha Matatini

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga


Hosted by the University of Auckland with 20 partners including:

  • tertiary education institutions – AUT, Eastern Institute of Technology; Lincoln, Massey, Waikato, Canterbury, Otago and Victoria universities; Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi and Unitec
  • Auckland War Memorial Museum
  • the Cawthron Institute
  • Eco Research Associates
  • Landcare Research
  • Te Atawhai O Te Ao
  •  Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
  • Te Tapuae o Rēhua
  • Whakauae Research Services\
  • Waikato-Tainui College of Research and Development.

Co-Directors: Associate Professor Tracey McIntosh (Tūhoe), University of Auckland, and Professor Jacinta Ruru (Raukawa, Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāti Maniapoto), University of Otago.

Ngā Pae o te Maramatanga (NPM) is New Zealand’s Indigenous Centre of Research Excellence, established in 2002. Its mission is to conduct research relevant to Māori communities, leading to transformation and positive change that develops the creative potential within Māori communities to achieve solutions to issues they face. NPM is an important vehicle by which Aotearoa New Zealand continues to be a key player in global indigenous research and affairs.

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga