Garling Wu

Sonic arts sets you up with a variety of skills in the technological world which you can then take into industry, says Bachelor of Music (Honours) student Garling Wu.

Garling Wu mixing a song on Pro Tools
Garling Wu mixing a song on Pro Tools

"I have played and learned music since I was seven, and in high school I was involved in a great music department. I played in rock and jazz bands as well as chamber ensembles.

“There were so many options for university study, so I did my research and chose music because it gave me the chance to be a creative and be challenged.

"In the first year of composition, you cover both traditional composition and sonic arts, and then you can choose to specialise.

“Traditional composition is for acoustic instruments and voice. Sonic arts uses electronics and technology to create works. You can record sounds or acoustic instruments, then move into the electronic domain to edit and manipulate them to create an experience you couldn’t get from an instrument alone.

“Sonic arts sets you up with a variety of skills in the technological world which you can then take into industry. Technology is always evolving, so it’s good to be in a field which makes use of that.

"I’ve had the chance to work with other disciplines, providing sounds for dancers, artists and a creative writer across the University. Collaborating across disciplines is giving me practical skills as I continue to learn, and is something I hope to continue once my studies are finished."