Research and Reports

Read about some of the current research projects being undertaken in the Centre.

Connect and Kōrero - Ministry for Youth Development report
Young people across the globe celebrate opportunities to express their voices and contribute when those opportunities are meaningful. Unfortunately, traditional, adult-driven approaches to youth participation are often tokenistic and can alienate rather than attract young people’s involvement. This issue is particularly the case with policy development, where important decisions that impact young people’s lives are made.

A team consisting of young people and adults working with the Centre for Asia Pacific Refugee Studies at the University of Auckland – Waipapa Taumata Rau and the Innovation Unit partnered with the Ministry of Youth Development (MYD) - Te Manatū Whakahiato Taiohi to co-design and implement an innovative initiative to address this noted policy gap.

This report provides an overview of the 18-month project, which was delivered over multiple phases with ethnic young people, community leaders and policymakers.

You can read the final report here.

Dislocation in an age of connection: Mapping refugee settlement trajectories

Rutherford Discovery Fellowship - Dislocation in an age of connection: Mapping refugee
settlement trajectories within an increasingly mobile world. This five-year research project will examine the various forms of connection that refugees sustain that help generate positive settlement outcomes and ongoing practices of transnational family through a range of qualitative and quantitative methods. It is composed of four distinct but linked
projects that incorporate ethnography, participatory action research, analysing large data sets and social network analysis. (Jay Marlowe)

Resettled but not Reunited: Refugees, Belonging and Digital Media
Marsden Fast Start, Royal Society of New Zealand, Resettled but not Reunited: Refugees, Belonging and Digital Media. This three-year study examines how refugees practise transnational family and friendship through social media. It examines how this relates to settlement outcomes as people are able to connect the ‘here’ of New Zealand to the transnational ‘there’. Methods include a longitudinal digital ethnography and a
national survey in New Zealand. (Jay Marlowe)

Building a Responsive Research Infrastructure for Climate and Conflict Induced Displacement in the Asia Pacific
Vice-Chancellor's Strategic Development Fund, Building a Responsive Research Infrastructure for Climate and Conflict Induced Displacement in the Asia Pacific. This project seeks to seed projects in the Pacific and integrate untapped large data sets (in NZ) to inform best practice and policy solutions related to forced migration. Included in this project are masters scholarships for Pacific students to conduct research on climate change displacement. (Jay Marlowe)

Developing a Guiding Framework for Engaging Pacific Populations in Disaster Risk
Public Policy Institute Research Impact Grant: Developing a Guiding Framework for Engaging Pacific Populations in Disaster Risk. This project focuses on disaster communications with various refugee background communities through capacity building with refugee background research assistants. (Jay Marlowe)

International Climate Migration and Climatic Poverty
Funded by the Royal Society of New Zealand and the German Ministry of Education and German Ministry of Education and Research, this interdisciplinary research project International Climate Migration and Climatic Poverty Traps in the Asia-Pacific Region (INTERCEPT) brings together expertise from economics, development studies and information science in Germany and New Zealand to examine the role of climatic changes in triggering the decision of individuals, families and communities to migrate within and across countries.

The research team will employ a comparative behavioural approach using qualitative interviews, network analysis, standardised experiments and surveys with people severely affected by climate change in Samoa, Solomon Islands and the Philippines as well as those having successfully migrated to New Zealand. The findings will inform policy-makers in different geographical contexts and at various administrative levels on how to develop anticipatory governance regimes for managing migration flows resulting from rapidly accelerating climate change. (Andreas Neef)

Climate-Induced Migration: Global Scope, Regional Impacts and National Policy Frameworks
Funded by the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), a consortium of WUN academics and non-WUN partners will provide holistic interdisciplinary expertise on the topic of climate-induced migration which is rapidly emerging as a major global challenge. The research consortium on Climate-Induced Migration: Global Scope, Regional Impacts and National Policy Frameworks will contribute to a better understanding of when, where, how and at what scale climate-induced migration takes place in different world regions. It will do so through a structured analysis of existing studies on this phenomenon, a systematic stock-taking of available research expertise across WUN members, and a global analysis of policy and legal frameworks pertaining to climate-induced migration.

The findings are expected to help inform policy measures in the field of international and internal migration and improve legal frameworks at the national and international level for the protection of so-called climate migrants. (Andreas Neef )