Economic value of Water and Policy


Project code: BUS002

Department

Economics

This project is part of a programme on the economics of water. It involves identifying and describing trends in, and current the state of, water allocation in selected catchments throughout New Zealand, and a larger report on existing approaches to water management in water scarce regions, such as Otago and Canterbury.

Promoting Women’s Participation as an Economic Development Strategy


Project code: BUS009

Department

Economics

This project will examine how socio-cultural bias against women reduces the wealth of a nation and undermines its economic wellbeing. While globalization have increased opportunities for women, crime against women (CAW) has continued to act as a barrier to women’s civic participation. This study will focus on the Indian economy to quantify the cost of such a barrier and aims to construct a proxy measure of gender bias against women and that of civil liberties for women using Indian data on different types of crimes against women.

Voting under Ambiguity


Project code: BUS022

Department

Economics

Supervisor

Dr Steffen Lippert

The jury paradox posits that, compared to majority voting, unanimous consensus delivers suboptimal collective decisions. This paradox depends, however, on the critical, yet unrealistic assumption that decision-makers receive information whose reliability can be precisely measured. Armed with preliminary findings that more realistic assumptions could rehabilitate unanimity as a desirable voting rule, we aim to develop new models of collective decision-making with information of unknown precision and derive a comprehensive set of theoretical predictions that can be tested in human subject laboratory experiments, emulating real-life decision-making.

Top pay-setting in the private and public sectors of New Zealand


Project code: BUS023

Department

Economics

The project analyses the causes of differences and changes in the remuneration of Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) in large public and private sector organisations in New Zealand, covering approximately the 1995-2015 period, over which CEO pay, on average, more than doubled in real terms.