Employee representation in family businesses: The case of the European company


Project code: BUS003

Department

Graduate School of Management

Supervisor

Dr Ben Fath

The research investigates the effects of family ownership on employee participation in company decision making in European companies. New regulation has enabled European companies to either embrace or to phase out employee participation and the degree of family ownership seems to influence this decision. Family businesses often tend to focus on informal rather than informal participatory arrangements and this research will shed light on some of the drivers behind this decision.

Developing public private sector partnerships and organisational resilience to cope with uncertainty


Project code: BUS006

Department

Graduate School of Management

The project involves helping to analyse data that have been collected on public-private partnerships, organisational resilience and uncertainty. The data are qualitative and hence need to be organised using NVivo and other qualitative database organisation tools.

Enhancing Supply Chain Performance for New Zealand Food and Beverage Exports to China – Literature Review and Preliminary Data Analysis


Project code: BUS008

Department

Graduate School of Management

NZ exports significant volumes of food and beverages to China. The transportation of perishable goods, from the NZ producer/manufacturer to the China distributor/retailer/manufacturer, often via a “cold” chain, is worthy of study – in particular to identify opportunities for improving effectiveness and efficiency.

Diffusion of innovation in higher education


Project code: BUS011

Department

Graduate School of Management

Universities like many organisations are under pressure to change. Globalisation, demographic shifts, technologies, government policy and sustainability issues all provide imperatives for developing flexible and strategic institutions that can innovate and adapt. This study reviews theories of innovation diffusion with the ambition of informing management and practice in higher education.

The effect of profit shifting on shareholder value


Project code: BUS014

Department

Graduate School of Management

Supervisor

branches and offices spanning jurisdictions, provides the firms with the opportunity to structure their affairs in various ways to support their objectives. While multinational branches are commonly used to manufacture cheaply in emerging markets, firms can also advantageously structure to maximize the advantage of different tax regimes through ‘profit shifting’ to minimise taxes paid in high-tax jurisdictions. With the current OECD focus on base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS), the practice is currently under debate.

What type of leadership matters most? A meta-analytic review of the effect of different leadership approaches on performance, satisfaction, commitment, and turnover intentions


Project code: BUS015

Department

Graduate School of Management

The field of leadership as a research topic has been increasing at an increasing pace in recent decades. Accordingly a large number of theoretical bases have emerged, at least 49 theories/approaches, according to a recent literature review. While this growth is indicative of the complexity and vibrancy of the field the sheer volume and variety of findings can be bewildering for practitioners and scholars alike. To provide the field with greater clarity we intend to conduct a meta-analysis of the relationships between the various theoretical bases of leadership and valued organizational outcomes such as performance, satisfaction, commitment, and turnover intentions.

When supply chains fail to support eco-labels: An empirical investigation


Project code: BUS018

Department

Graduate School of Management

Supervisor

Dr Lincoln C. Wood

Eco-labels on products have emerged as a method to assure consumers of the ‘pedigree’ of a product and work on the assumption that consumers prefer these products and ‘will vote with their wallets.' Sustainably minded consumers are willing to pay more for eco-labelled tinned fish products, or spend more time searching for a similarly sustainable product if their preferred option is unavailable.