Ethnicity, gender and health beliefs: How may health promotion messages to Māori and Pasifika peoples be improved?


Project code: BUS007

Department

Management and International Business

Supervisor

Dr Carla Houkamau

There are clear health disparities between different ethnic groups in New Zealand. However, we know surprisingly little about the health beliefs of different ethnic groups. The current research project will analyse nationally representative data to examine whether the health beliefs of European, Māori, Pasifika and Asian men and women differ from one another. Moreover, the study will look specifically at which specific health beliefs might differ across groups, such as beliefs about the importance of limiting salts, fats and sugars, and the importance of eating fruit/vegetables, fibre and getting regular exercise. This research will provide up-to-date and nationally representative data on the health beliefs of different ethnic groups, and these results may help to inform education information campaigns addressing differences in the specific types of health beliefs held by different ethnic groups.

The Entrepreneur’s Spouse & Family – representations in popular business press


Project code: BUS013

Department

Management and International Business

Supervisor

Dr Janine Swail

Since the days of the ‘robber barons’ – Vanderbilt, Rockefeller and Carnegie – famous entrepreneurs have been the focus of newspapers, books and film. Following the rise in the early 1980s of what has become a global culture of enterprise (Keat and Abercrombie, 1990), the popular media have intensified this interest to the extent that figures such as Richard Branson, Alan Sugar and Donald Trump have come to stand for ‘the entrepreneur’. Yet little is known about entrepreneurs’ embedded social networks. This project will examine the relevance and portrayal of spouse/partner and family in shaping the overall all narrative and image of successful entrepreneurs.

Competitive dynamics within populations of internationalising SMEs


Project code: BUS019

Department

Management and International Business

Recent exploratory research at the University of Auckland has shown that an SME’s competitors in NZ directly influence how that SME internationalises. In particular, SMEs mimic other SMEs in their domestic industry population prior to internationalisation. As a consequence, some SMEs have a substantial influence on the success of a new industry segment by unwittingly acting as industry models, even though these firms may still be small and unknown outside of their industry. Understanding more about these firms and their network relationships will help government agencies to understand where best to apply seed funding for broader industry benefit and to help start-up SMEs evaluate which salient SMEs to follow or with which to align themselves. The next phase of this research requires a database of companies for a quantitative analysis of competitive networks.