New Literacy Skills for Translators in the 21st Century – With Special Emphasis on Technology


Project code: ART012

Disciplinary Areas

European Languages and Literatures 

 

This project is one of two closely related projects aimed at developing new literacy skills for translators in the 21st century. In a new world of digital production and consumption (or “prosumption”), this project specifically looks at technology factors that have contributed to the continuous challenge posed to two traditional forms of language and cultural support—translation and interpretation—by the new contexts that information and communication (ICT) technologies afford for human communication and interactions; the inexorable growth of the translation market, originally driven by the multibillion-dollar business known as the GILT industry (i.e., globalization, internationalization, localization, translation); and, more recently, the global diffusion of social media, which has led to increased consumption of multilingual content, creating a demand that traditional professional translation alone cannot satisfy. In doing so, the project aims at promoting the successful training of technology-savvy translators, placing special emphasis on new developments in statistical machine translation, translation memory systems and localization tools (i.e. the core translation computer-aided translation tools used by translators in the 21st century).

Scholar’s Work

The successful scholar will engage in the following research phases: (1) collecting data both from scholarly works and industry-related materials (e.g. white papers, survey reports, advertising brochures, etc.) on latest translation technologies and tools, especially translation memory systems, statistical machine systems and software localization tools; (2) comparing their functionality and assessing their impact on the translation process; and (3) summarizing pedagogical applications found in the literature of translation technology and its teaching.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Postgraduate students with a background in translation are required for this project. The successful scholar will have fundamental skills in and know-how on the use of computer-aided translation tools in general.

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New Zealand Narrations of World War I


Project code: ART043

Disciplinary Area

European Languages and Literatures 

 

Supervisor

Franco Manai

The construction of national, regional and ethnic identities in Italy and New Zealand: stories of World War 1.

The objective of this research project is to show the dialectic process through which, in both New Zealand and Italy, the ‘stories’ about World War 1 told by the soldiers during the war or when they returned home – in personal and official letters, diaries, memoires, recordings – contributed to the formation of national identities. The Italian case is comparable to that of the British Empire because the Italian government treated a region such as the island of Sardinia as a colony. So Sardinian people were asked to join the war in order to prove that they were not ‘subjects’ but real citizens of the Italian state.  For most of the soldiers their experiences lacked the richness of meaning which subsequent and politically oriented interpretations would give them. These well-structured narrations of life on the front line influenced more and more the stories that the returned veterans would tell to their communities and families. This project will collect and analyse the WW1 stories of Italian and New Zealand soldiers and veterans in order to highlight similarities and differences between ‘immediate’ tales and later ones. It will then illustrate how the interpretations of the stories constructed in New Zealand a double national identity, Maori/Pakeha,in Italy a split national/regional one.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will have to locate the libraries and archives where the private and official letters, diaries, memoires, recordings, notebooks, etc. of New Zealand soldiers are kept. Most of the material will be available at the National Library of New Zealand in Wellington or Auckland (especially the General Reference Service and Music Room), The Alexander Turnbull Library and the New Zealand Archival System. However there might be other sources that the scholar might want to investigate. Some of the texts will be available on line, already digitized, some will be accessible only on site. In this case the scholar will have to photocopy them. Once the material has been gathered the scholar will order and classify it following criteria and procedures that I will provide and that include time, place, theme, motif, summaries among others.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Carry out research in libraries and archives, i.e. ability to  to identify the range of material within collections, to access relevant documents, and to interpret their contents productively. Ability to summarize and classify stories, letters, diaries, following directions.

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Displaying the Emotional Life of Early Modern Queens

Displaying the Emotional Life of Early Modern Queens


Project code:  ART018

Disciplinary Area

Art History

 

Supervisor

Erin Griffey

Early modern queens were always on display, their actions and appearance the subject of endless reporting and speculation by courtiers and ambassadors, confessors and critics, and of course the public at large. Decorum was central to behaviour in court life, insisting that emotions were appropriate to the situation at hand. In general this seems to have necessitated the restraint of emotions in many public contexts, such as coronations and ambassadorial visits. Certain contexts leant themselves to the display of happiness: betrothal, marriage and the birth of a healthy child, while the death of a husband or child saw the display of grief.

Scholars have traditionally taken accounts of queens’ emotions at face-value, accepting that their emotional display was genuine and natural. While it is unsurprising that these situatons generated such emotions, this study asks how the emotional life of queens was conceptualised in word and image, if there are patterns of terminology and circumstance. In addition, it asks if there was a political and/or confessional purpose to displays of emotion in certain contexts.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will undertake research on three early modern queens and an archduchess, looking at contemporary accounts of their lives (ambassadorial accounts, letters, biographies, poems, memoirs) and painted, sculpted and engraved portraits:

Archduchess Isabella (Sourthern Netherlands)

Marie de Medici (France)

Anne of Austria (France)

Catherine of Braganza (England)

The scholar will create an annotated bibliography for each woman, organised chronologically, alongside contemporaneous visual depictions, with notes considering the portrayal (or lack thereof) of emotions. Printed primary sources will be the focus, but the scholar will also consult secondary sources. The scholar will consider the terminology used by early modern writers to describe emotions, the situations and locations in which they occur, the people who witness it, the reliabiity or agenda of the author, and the potential political and/or religious benefit of the display of the emotion. For images, the iconography of emotional display will be examined, for example, the wearing of widow’s dress or other symbolism.

If the scholar does not have French and/or Spanish, then other English queens will be examined.

If there are time constraints, the study will be limited to two or three women.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

BA major in History, English, Art History, French and/or Spanish

French and/or Spanish would be an advantage given that there is quite a lot of primary literature on Isabella in Spanish and Marie and Anne in French.

Strong research and writing skills

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