Asian Studies

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Australian multicultural theatre: identity and enactment


Supervisor

Dr Hilary Chung
Extension 84603

Discipline

Asian Studies

Project code: ART008

This is a comparative study of contemporary diasporic Asian theatre in New Zealand, Australia and Canada, which centres on enactments of and responses to multicultural policy and/or practice.  Specifically, plays by and about Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Indian experience in these three countries of settlement written in English and accessible to general audiences are analysed from a range of perspectives including:

  • dialogues with prevailing multicultural discourses of national identity
  • deployment of the racially marked body on stage
  • audience, review and adaptation
  • drawing and building on academic discourses in postcolonial theatre and (post)colonial history

In the Australian and Canadian cases most scholarship focuses on single authors and/or multicultural issues in that domain.  The case of New Zealand theatre is relatively ‘adolescent’ in terms of development and profile, and very little work has been done apart from my own. 

Scholar’s Work

1. to complete a critical bibliography of secondary scholarship on Australian multiculturalism and Asian-Australian theatre

2. to produce a bibliography of primary sources – Asian-Australian plays and reviews of performances

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

An interest and skills in literary criticism; an interest in and/or experience of multicultural identity

No language skills are required but any relevant ability could be advantageous

Applicants should address these required skills in their application and indicate if they have been in touch with the proposed supervisor.

Canadian multicultural theatre: identity and enactment


Supervisor

Dr Hilary Chung
Extension 84603

Discipline

Asian Studies

Project code: ART009

This is a comparative study of contemporary diasporic Asian theatre in New Zealand, Australia and Canada, which centres on enactments of and responses to multicultural policy and/or practice.  Specifically, plays by and about Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Indian experience in these three countries of settlement written in English and accessible to general audiences are analysed from a range of perspectives including:

  • dialogues with prevailing multicultural discourses of national identity
  • deployment of the racially marked body on stage
  • audience, review and adaptation
  • drawing and building on academic discourses in postcolonial theatre and (post)colonial history

In the Australian and Canadian cases most scholarship focuses on single authors and/or multicultural issues in that domain.  The New Zealand case is relatively ‘adolescent’ in terms of development and profile, and very little work has been done apart from my own. 

Scholar’s Work

1. to complete a critical bibliography of secondary scholarship on Canadian multiculturalism and Asian-Canadian theatre

2. to produce a bibliography of primary sources – Asian-Canadian plays and reviews of performances

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

An interest and skills in literary criticism; an interest in and/or experience of multicultural identity

No language skills are required but any relevant ability could be advantageous

Applicants should address these required 

New Zealand-China people-to-people relations since 1972


Supervisor

Prof. Paul Clark
(09) 923-7536

Discipline

Asian Studies

Project code: ART010

“Kiwi and Dragon: New Zealand-China People-to-People Relations, 1972-2022” is a new book project, covering fifty years of activities since the establishment of diplomatic relations with Beijing.  The areas to be covered include the people-side of business and trade relations, educational relations, immigration, and Māori-Chinese relations.  Sources will include archives and interviews with participants in NZ and China.  My aim is to cover the themes from both sides: NZ and China.  Book publication will mark the anniversary of relations in 2022.

In New Zealand government records give some insight, but the main source on the New Zealand side will be records of organisations such as the China-New Zealand Friendship Association, books and other published memoirs, business records, sister city organisations, and newspapers.  In Beijing sources include the NZ Embassy archives, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Library, and business and other persons based in the city.  The Chinese People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries also has records of relations with NZ, including sister cities.

Scholar’s Work

The Scholar will gather and analyse materials related to one (or even two) area of the project that interests them.  These areas include:

           (1) NZ and Chinese businesses’ engagements

           (2) Māori/iwi engagement in the NZ-China relationship

           (3) cultural exchanges and interactions (performing arts, museums, film, sports)

           (4) the changing involvement of immigrant Chinese in the relationship

           (5) the range of sister-city activities

           (6) the changing fortunes of the China-NZ Friendship Association

           (7) popular discourse about China and changing perceptions in NZ

           (8) popular discourse in China about New Zealand

Sources include library work, internet work, and a two-box collection I have made over the past five years of materials related to the topic.

The Scholar will compile sources related to the theme, produce an annotated bibliography, and in a written report, identify key trends and issues in the theme and its evolution over fifty years.  These will be exercises in analysing historical materials and history writing.

There is potential for a publication (sole-authored by the Scholar or co-authored).  Depending on quality, this could be considered as an article or research note in the New Zealand Journal of Asian Studies or similar outlet.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

An interest in New Zealand history and experience in historical research and writing.  Prior knowledge of the general shape of NZ-China relations, trade etc. would be helpful.  Good writing skills are essential.  Chinese-language skills are not required, but could be put to productive use on Chinese materials for part of the scholarship period.

30 Years of Chinese Language Pedagogy Research: A Review of Selected Research


Supervisor

Danping Wang

Discipline

Asian Studies

Project code: ART011

Chinese as a second language teaching and learning has developed into an independent discipline and an important field of research since the first academic journal was launched in 1987. Over the last three decades, scholarly publications on Chinese language teaching and learning have proliferated. This study reviews the research outputs on Chinese language pedagogy published in international academic journals from 1987 to 2016 and sketches out the nature of this corpus of research. The review covers research articles published in major Chinese-medium journals based in China and international English-medium journals. A bibliometric analysis will be employed to provide a quantitative and diachronic description of authorship and their geographic distributions, article genres and research methodology in order to map the overall development of knowledge production in the field of Chinese language pedagogy research. Thematic analysis will also be applied to categorise the major research areas. The study will offer a systematic account of the historical development of Chinese language pedagogy research. The study will also help identify the gaps that future research needs to address, and assist scholars to adjust their research focus  on a more constructive disciplinary growth for Chinese language teaching and learning.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will assist the supervisor with developing a literature review, database construction, coding and data analysis, and writing research reports, depending on the expertise of the summer scholar. The study includes three major parts of work. In the beginning stage, the scholar will conduct a literature review of articles on Chinese language pedagogy research, and identify key journals for systematic analysis. The second stage of the study involves intensive work  on corpus construction with the articles selected from the previous stage. The final stage  involves data analysis and report preparation.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The research mainly involves literature review, literature retrieval and synthesis, and data processing and coding, so the applicant should have experience and skills of all or some of these duties. As the study focuses on Chinese language pedagogy research, the applicant is expected to be able to read and write Chinese in addition to being academically literate in English. The project particularly welcomes applicants who are familiar with second language education research, or committed to becoming Chinese language teachers or researchers. Applicants who are familiar with e-database and are able to use Excel, SPSS, Endnote or RefWorks will be prioritised. Other desirable qualities include the ability to work independently, meticulousness, and a willingness to learn.


Applicants should address these required skills in their application and indicate if they have been in touch with the proposed supervisor.