Advice for academic staff

All academic units and individual course organisers can draw on good practice to limit the possibilities for academic misconduct.

The University encourages a proactive approach to limiting the potential for academic misconduct and promotes resources to help reduce misconduct.

Practical suggestions for limiting academic misconduct.

Design coursework assessments to minimise the possibility of academic misconduct.

Academic misconduct undermines subject-specific and broader educational outcomes. Communicate and discuss with students to reinforce this message.

Enable students to discuss their attitudes towards academic misconduct. Most abhor cheating, and peer pressure can be a powerful means of control and reducing risk.

Provide advice and examples on how to approach approach the preparation of assignments so that students learn patterns of good academic behaviour.

Similarly, provide specific illustrative examples of academic misconduct. ‘Grey’ areas need to be illustrated and discussed.

Students need to know how to obtain advice.

Raise awareness of support mechanisms for at-risk students. Departments can assist students having learning difficulties by providing tutorials, office hours, clinics, etc. In some cases, individual counseling may be needed.

Tell students about the Libraries and Learning Services’ workshops and resources. You can contact a Subject Librarian or Learning Adviser to discuss class-specific activities.

Students need to know what constitutes academic misconduct, and what is acceptable and unacceptable behaviour. Give them clear context-specific definitions of academic misconduct.

Encourage students to complete our Academic Integrity Course.

Clearly signal clearly the range of penalties for academic misconduct.

Make students aware of Referen©ite

Staff can help by offering students a sample assignment cover sheet with a statement on academic honesty. Download the cover sheet here