Commercial Law

A toss of a (bit)coin

Supervisor

Prof. Julie Cassidy
Faculty of Business
Project code: BUS002

Using blockchain technology, hundreds of cryptocurrencies are being created and traded. Bitcoins are by far the most popular cryptocurrency, but many others exist. The popular “coins” fluctuate dramatically in “prices”, where realised and unrealised, gains are being made by coin-holders. The economic substance of cryptocurrencies gives them value, but to date the law has not definitively defined this substance.

Goals:

  1. To identify and critically evaluate the regulatory and tax treatment of cryptocurrencies in key nations.
  2. To recommend a regulatory framework for the creation and trading of cryptocurrencies.
  3. To recommend the appropriate tax treatment of profits from the sale of cryptocurrencies.

Methods: Traditional legal methodology involving primarily qualitative research but also in regard to taxation issues some quantitative analysis.

Anticipated outputs from the student: The student will assist with the literature review and legal analysis. The student will produce a written report on their research findings.

The use of modern technologies in the Chinese Legal System

Supervisor

Dr Benjamin Liu
Faculty of Business
Project code: BUS003

The Chinese government has put a high priority on adopting modern technologies in its legal system. For example, two Internet Courts have been established where every step of proceedings is conducted online: court documents can now be served through WeChat (a social media platform much more powerful than Facebook); and the Ministry of Justice runs a website where the public can find a lawyer, apply for legal aid, or even get free advice provided by artificial intelligence.

Goals:

  • To analyse the impact of modern technologies on the Chinese Legal System. In particular, will they help address the access to justice problem and improve the quality of the judicial decision-making?
  • To study what lessons (if any) Western legal systems can draw from the Chinese experience of the technological transformation.

Methods: Traditional legal methodology involving primarily qualitative research.

Anticipated outputs from the student: The student will assist with the literature review and legal analysis, and co-author an article to be published in a peer-reviewed journal.