Architecture and Planning

Understanding collapse in the built environment

Supervisor

Dr Emilio Garcia

Faculty of Creative Arts and Industries

Project code: CAI001

This research project looks at exploring the potential collapse of modern human society and its organisation, and why the built environment (urban and rural) is an important factor in this. The focus is on social and ecological issues like climate change, resource shortages and the increase in marginal returns produced by the complexity of the built environment. Proposals are welcome either to develop literature reviews on key topics (collapse, complex systems, resilience) or to measure the social and environmental impact of specific case studies (Singapore, Mexico City, Auckland, Doha, Riyadh, Bangalore, Vienna, Tonle Sap Lake, Miami, Houston, Lagos Karachi and Shanghai). The candidate should have a background in fields related to the built environment or human geography. Knowledge of GIS, basic statistics and economics are welcomed.

Algorithms, AI and Architecture

Supervisor

Dr Dermott McMeel

Faculty of Creative Arts and Industries

Project code: CAI002

This project develops ongoing research that investigates the application of algorithms and artificial intelligence to urban design. You will be working on original research that aims to apply algorithmic space planning to urban design - experience with Rhino, Grasshopper and Python is necessary. The research has developed a methodology that combines algorithms and AI, derived from emerging office spatial planning research. It aims to optimise for both maximum occupancy and quality of experience. You will be developing a technology demonstrator to apply these same principles to a specific instance of urban planning.

Chip of the New Block: Blockchain for the Design and Construction sector

Supervisor

Dr Dermott McMeel

Faculty of Creative Arts and Industries

Project code: CAI003

The research question is: Where and how can Blockchain technology change the construction industry? There is extreme hype around Blockchain. In many sectors researchers are looking at the implications of Blockchain and exploring where and how it might be applied. So how can it help construction? During 2019 you will assist with leading a series of national workshops to help people understand Blockchain. Our workshops will target people from design, construction and facility managers. Each workshop comprises two parts, the first is a series of ‘games’ constructing what are essentially physical ‘Blockchains’ with Lego; helping participants understand Blockchain. The second part of the workshop participants brainstorm new ideas for Blockchain within their business and across the industry. By the end of the workshops you will have collated and developed a list of ideas from the workshops where Blockchain can be implemented across architecture, engineering, construction and facility management.

CCCP: Customizable Composite Computing Parametric Pipelines

Supervisor

Dr Dermott McMeel

Faculty of Creative Arts and Industries

Project code: CAI004

New Zealand is a world leader in composite and carbon fibre manufacturing, particularly in the marine sector with significant parts of both the America’s Cup finalist 2013 and 2017 yachts manufactured here. You will be working with New Zealand Manufacturing and Design Network researchers, as well as world leaders in composite and carbon-fibre manufacturing. The aim of this project is to create a Technology Demonstrator of a customizable composite computing parametric pipeline using software such as Grasshopper to interface with industrial robots. Composite manufacture is an 'artisanal' industry relying on tacit knowledge and craftsmanship. This research (1) deepens our understanding of the industry and how and where that knowledge, craftsmanship and creative capital can be used (2) explores where automation can be used to alleviate the burden of repetitive or dangerous tasks (3) document how this change affects the social, cultural and organizational practices of the industry.

Drawing the Room | Drawing within the Room

Supervisor

Dr Marian Macken

Faculty of Creative Arts and Industries

Project code: CAI005

This research project draws on three main research interests: architectural drawings, documentation of built space, and architectural exhibitions. It examines novel ways to exhibit architectural drawings and the consequent inhabiting of five built houses designed by the Auckland-based practice PAC Studio. The project uses innovative methods of documenting movement within space, which integrates motion capture technology and audio recordings. This audio-visual data is then linked with each house’s construction drawings – the drawings used to build the finished houses – and exhibited full scale within the space of the office in which they were drawn. Hence, the exhibition connects ‘projective’ construction drawings with post factum documentation of the built work within the space in which it was designed.