History

Engaging with Auckland’s history

Supervisor

Linda Bryder (Ext 87319, Room 206.729)

Discipline

History

Project code: ART012

The student will assist to advance the goals of the Auckland History Initiative (AHI), located in History, School of Humanities. The AHI seeks to engage with and capture the historical and cultural development, the vibrancy and diversity of Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland and its importance to New Zealand life and beyond. Its aim is to reach beyond the University to build strong and enduring connections with Auckland’s many history and heritage institutions and communities and put Auckland’s history at the heart of an energetic conversation about our city. The Summer Scholar will be part of that process, and specifically will form an early part of a wider project which the AHI is planning to develop, which is Ngā Ara o Haere –A Framework for Auckland History. In collaboration with stakeholders including iwi, Council, central government agencies, the GLAM sector (galleries, libraries, archives and museums), research institutes and local historical societies, the AHI aims to develop a common framework of overarching high-level themes with which to approach the history of Auckland. The Scholar will assist in starting that process.

Scholar’s Work

In order to build up a Framework for the study of Auckland’s past in its multifaceted past, including urban, transnational, ethnic, cultural, social and environmental histories, the student will seek out archival material relevant to the study of Auckland history. This is a preliminary scoping exercise in order to get a sense of the available sources, and the kinds of research questions one can ask of them. The student will spend two weeks in each specified location: these locations will be by negotiation. A starting point could be the University of Auckland Special Collections, and I have already had discussions with the curator Stephen Innes. The Sir George Grey Collection at the Auckland City Library is another obvious location for a scoping study, along with the War Memorial Museum, the Auckland City Archives and the South Auckland Research Centre. The student will report on the range of sources relevant to Auckland history and conduct one case study at each location showing the wider relevance of one set of records. The results will be written up for our website and will possibly lead to further postgraduate research.

Required Skills/Pre-requisitesSome historical training will be a pre-requisite along with basic computer skills. The student will not necessarily have already engaged with primary source material, but will have good analytical and writing skills.

Applicants should address these required skills in their application and indicate if they have been in touch with the proposed supervisor.

Historical sources for (science) education at Auckland

Mana Whenua: Engaging with Auckland’s Māori history

Supervisor

Linda Bryder (Ext 87319, Room 206.729)

Discipline

History

Project code: ART013

The student will assist to advance the goals of the Auckland History Initiative (AHI), located in History, School of Humanities. The AHI seeks to engage with and capture the historical and cultural development, the vibrancy and diversity of Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland and its importance to New Zealand life and beyond. Its aim is to reach beyond the University to build strong and enduring connections with Auckland’s many history and heritage institutions and communities and put Auckland’s history at the heart of an energetic conversation about our city. The Summer Scholar will be part of that process, and specifically will form an early part of a wider project which the AHI is currently developing, which is Ngā Ara o Haere –A Framework for Auckland History. In collaboration with stakeholders including iwi, Council, central government agencies, the GLAM sector (galleries, libraries, archives and museums), research institutes and local historical societies, the AHI aims to develop a common framework of overarching high-level themes with which to approach the history of Auckland. The Scholar will assist in the early stages of that project.

Scholar’s Work

In order to build a Framework for the study of Auckland’s multifaceted past, including urban, transnational, ethnic, cultural, social and environmental histories, the Scholar will seek out archival material relevant to the study of Auckland Mana Whenua history. This is a preliminary scoping exercise in order to get a sense of the available sources, and the kinds of research questions one can ask of them. The student will spend two weeks in each specified location: these locations will be by negotiation. A starting point could be the University of Auckland Special Collections, and I have already had discussions with the curator Stephen Innes. The Sir George Grey Collection at the Auckland City Library is another obvious location for a scoping study, along with the War Memorial Museum, the Auckland City Archives and the South Auckland Research Centre. The student will report on the range of sources relevant to Auckland’s Māori history and conduct a case study at each location showing the wider relevance of one set of records. This case study will be in accordance with the scholar’s own research interests. The results will be written up for our website and will possibly lead to further postgraduate research.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Some historical training will be a pre-requisite along with basic computer skills. The student will not necessarily have already engaged with primary source material, but will have good analytical and writing skills. Some background in Māori history will be useful.

Applicants should address these required skills in their application and indicate if they have been in touch with the proposed supervisor.

“Let Us Vote”: Youth Voting Rights and the 26th Amendment to the US Constitution

Supervisor

A/P Jennifer Frost

Discipline

History

Project code: ART014

This research project is an examination of the campaign for the youth vote and the 26th Amendment to the US Constitution, ratified in 1971. The 26th Amendment mandated that states could not deny the right to vote to American citizens aged 18 and over, enfranchising for the first time Americans between 18 and 21 years of age. This extension of the franchise to young people grew out of the demands of the social movements of the 1960s. Participants in these movements demanded inclusion into the American polity to exercise their political participation on an equal basis with older citizens. Together with legal advocates and mainstream politicians, they pursued their goal in a contested but eventually successful campaign. How and why this campaign emerged, proceeded, and succeeded are the overarching research questions for this project. Understanding who participated in the campaign, their arguments and strategies, their conflicts and coalitions, and developments on the local, state, and national levels will explain a major advance toward democracy and equality in U.S. politics. It also will help to contextualise the important ‘youth vote’ today.

Scholar’s Work

The Summer Scholar will work on the oral history component of this project. In the past 18 months, intensive research has yielded voluminous primary source materials, including newspaper and other media accounts, government documents, legal cases, organizational records, and popular culture sources. With this base of materials, I am now ready to commence with oral interviews, which the Scholar will help with planning and organizing. As this is recent history, many of the participants are still living and available for interviewing. The Scholar will help with adding to and compiling a definitive list of possible interviewees, locating and contacting them, developing questions, and assembling the University’s Ethics approval application. Then, assuming Ethics approval is forthcoming, the Summer Scholar would engage in interviewing. With time, the Scholar could begin abstracting/transcribing the interviews.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

This project would best suit a Scholar who has studied history, is familiar with basic historical research, methods, and analysis, has solid writing skills, and has demonstrated the characteristics of initiative, goal-setting, and time management in their own tertiary studies. Ideally they will have taken History 241 or History 341 and be well versed in the history of the 1960s USA, although this is not a requirement. The Scholar is not expected to have familiarity with conducting oral interviews.

Applicants should address these required skills in their application and indicate if they have been in touch with the proposed supervisor.

The Rituals and Materials of Mourning for Early Modern European Queens

At Face Value? The Art and Science of Complexion in Early Modern Europe