Media and Communication

Why We March (documentary)

Supervisor

Annie Goldson

Discipline

Media and Communication

Project code: ART016

Why We March began as a feature documentary (90 mins) on transnational feminism. It was initially based on a series of personal ‘case studies’ of women in different countries, linked by images of the Global Women’s March of 2017. Each case study tells an individual woman’s story: overall, the film provides a ‘snapshot’ of current feminist concerns (e.g. a Maori woman wanting to speak on her marae; an American in the class action suit against Harvey Weinstein; an Argentinian activist, part of #NiUnaMenos, anti-femicide movement). We received development funding from the NZ Film Commission and produced a trailer (see below) that we took to the international marketplace. Feedback was positive but indicated an interest in a documentary series rather than a single film. A series would allow more depth, and could find readier distribution through streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon. Whether we produce a series or a feature, we need to continue to research world-wide to find individual stories that will be most effective on screen. We also liaising with filmmakers in each country represented, as we will devolve the director role. Our team includes two former MA Screen students, Kate Stevenson (outreach producer) and Kimberly Hihaka (producer).

Why We March website

Scholar’s Work

A scholar would assist us in what is a very large research task, much of it done online and which involves fundamentally combing the world for 6-8 excellent stories that represent the struggle, pain and at times exhilaration that women are experiencing as a new wave of feminist activism attempts to challenge entrenched patriarchal behaviours everywhere and in different ways. The student would need to liaise with our existing contacts in multiple countries finding individual stories, and crafting them through treatments into potential narratives. They would also explore the production sector in each country, finding excellent filmmakers and directors who would be prepared to undertake making each segment. The student could also be involved in other tasks involved in producing, such as budgeting, scheduling, treatment writing and basic editing.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

  • A deep interest in and knowledge about feminism and gender studies.
  • Excellent online research skills.
  • Good communication skills, both written and oral.
  • Ability to synthesize complex issues into simpler narratives that still capture the heart of the issue.
  • Ability in Word, Excel and possibly editing software such as Premiere Pro.
  • Ability to work independently, but also in a team and to deadline.
  • Second language a plus.

Applicants should address these required skills in their application and indicate if they have been in touch with the proposed supervisor.

ANZ Premiership Netball online fan community

Supervisor

Margaret Henley (working in collaboration with Professor Toni Bruce, Faculty of Education and Social Work). 

Discipline

Media and Communication

Project code: ART017

The major component of this research project is a continuation of the 2015/16 Summer Scholarship. This is the final year of a three-year study is researching the interrelationships between netball's fan communities, the sport and the broadcaster through the use of social media platforms during the ANZ Netball Premiership competition. It will be focused predominantly on Facebook, twitter and Instagram, and explore the ways in which social media is used to stimulate fan engagement by the broadcaster, the sport and by individual athletes. It will also, through the use of focus groups and online social media contact, research a range of fan communities associated with the sport linked to specific netball events. This research is linked into a wider study of the relationship between tradition broadcasting of netball and the role of social media. A secondary component will be researching material for the Netball NZ Heritage project that is linked into my ongoing broadcasting history project. A very strong preference is for a Maori or Pasifika student who has a background in netball and contacts within the netball community.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will be tracking social media sites, athlete-fan engagement and fan communities associated with New Zealand elite netball. This will include analysing data gathered by the previous Summer Scholars working on this project. It will also pull together data gathered by Henley and Bruce during the 2017 and 2018 ANZ netball competition. They will assist with interviews of fans and working alongside the Netball NZ and SKY Television social media teams and receive full press accreditation. A secondary component of the project will be researching material for the Netball NZ Heritage project. This will require archive and data base research and creating content for the NNZ Heritage webpage. A strong preference is for a Maori or Pasifika student who has a background in netball, contacts within the netball community and the required social media skills. Video editing skills would also be desirable to work with material in my personal archive and that of Netball NZ.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

  • High level of familiarity as a user of Facebook, twitter and Instagram and ability to use social media diagnostic tools.
  • Ability to undertake historical research in major NZ archives and data bases such as Alexander Turnbull National Archives, NZ Film and audio archives, Papers Past National Library and sourcing of provincial archival material in libraries and sports institutions.
  • Oral skills to present findings to major netball professional institutions such as Netball NZ and provincial netball franchises who are participating in the project.
  • An ability to access the Maori and/or pacific netball fan community is a priority for the research project this summer if a suitable scholar can be found.

Applicants should address these required skills in their application and indicate if they have been in touch with the proposed supervisor.

Imperial Encounters: Giuseppe Castiglione, an Italian Painter at the Chinese Court

Supervisor

Professor Laurence Simmons

Discipline

Media and Communication

Project code: ART018

Of the emperors ruling China’s long eighteenth century of the High Qing era, Qianlong (ruled 1736-1795) proved the most influential and innovative. During Qianlong’s reign, a large coterie of European Jesuits served the court as scientific advisors, translators, and most famously, as artists. The Italian Jesuit lay brother and trained professional painter Giuseppe Castiglione (1688–1766, who adopted the Chinese name Lang Shining), the best known of all the European painters at the Qing court and who served the three High Qing emperors successively over five decades in China, was essential to the evolution of the High Qing court style and its incorporation of European illusionistic painting techniques and linear perspective. Castiglione was also known for the design of the ‘European Palaces’ in the Imperial Gardens Yuanmingyuan (Old Summer Palace) in northwest Beijing. The European Palaces fell victim to looting and burning by British and French troops at nineteenth-century during the Second Opium War (1856–1860), an event that continues to rankle the People’s Republic of China today. This study aims to take a postcolonial perspective on Castiglione’s achievement. Postcolonial in the sense that crucial notions of hybridity, catalysis, mimicry, ambivalence and exoticism all inform the cross-cultural fusion of aesthetics and painting techniques developed by Castiglione in China. Postcolonial also in the sense that the cultural destruction and fate of Yuanmingyuan is bitterly resented in Chinese minds and constantly resurfaces in Chinese popular films, angry social media debates, and exchanges over international art sales.

Scholar’s Work

The main task of the Summer Scholar will be to assemble a bibliography of primary and secondary sources in Chinese on the painter Giuseppe Castiglione, and to translate the most relevant of these into English.

Concurrently the Summer Scholar will collect a database of images both of Castiglione’s work but also other relevant artists.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Knowledge of Mandarin and ability to translate into English.
Ability to search Chinese archives online.
Knowledge of the history of Chinese and Western painting.

Applicants should address these required skills in their application and indicate if they have been in touch with the proposed supervisor.