Social Sciences

Secondary punishment? Digital exclusion amongst those leaving prison in Aotearoa New Zealand

Supervisor

Dr Alice Mills (Ph 09 923 4505)
Associate Professor Barry Milne (Ph 09 923 9168)

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART001

Project

Offenders and ex-offenders have been identified as a group that is most at risk of being digitally excluded in New Zealand (Digital Inclusion Research Group 2017). Our Marsden-funded research has confirmed that many people leaving prison do not have any access to the internet, and due to low literacy rates amongst the prison population and limited internet access in prison, many former prisoners also lack the skills to navigate digital technologies effectively. In New Zealand, as elsewhere, current rehabilitation practices tend to ‘target offline realms and issues, whilst disregarding the digital realm’ (Reisdorf and Rikard 2018:1273). Yet without internet access, people leaving prison face substantial difficulties finding housing or employment, and accessing welfare benefits, health and education services, which may ultimately contribute an increased risk of re-offending. Such difficulties are particularly likely to affect Māori due to their over-representation in the prison population and amongst the digitally excluded in the general population (Lips 2015). This research aims to explore the nature and extent of digital exclusion amongst those leaving prison. It will identify how digital exclusion affects the process of reintegration into the community and explore possible solutions, whilst laying the groundwork for a potential future Marsden application.

Scholar’s Work

The Summer Scholar will be expected to firstly conduct a review of the existing literature in relation to the digital and social exclusion of people who have been incarcerated. They will then carry out a review of rehabilitation and reintegration policy, and processes to access welfare benefits and other government services, in order to explore the issues and challenges faced by people leaving prison who do not have access to digital technologies, and ways in which such challenges can be addressed. This may include short consultations with various agencies working in the field of prisoner reintegration such as Auckland PARS, the Pathway Trust and the Ministry of Social Development. Finally, the Summer Scholar will explore various options for a larger, mixed methods research project in this area. Possible methods for this research including an analysis of data from the Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI) and semi-structured interviews with people who have recently left prison and their whānau. The student researcher will be expected to write a 5,000 word research report which incorporates the literature and policy review with a discussion of the options for future research. The supervisors will apply for ethics approval for this research well in advance of the start of the Summer Scholarship.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The ideal candidate will have some knowledge and interest in imprisonment, prisoner reintegration or digital exclusion in New Zealand, and will have a background in Social Sciences, Social Work or Law. They will have good research and communication skills, and will be able to review relevant literature and policy documentation and write a research report encompassing their findings. They will also have excellent interpersonal skills and some knowledge of the application of different social research methods.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. Week 2 (30 Nov-4 Dec) to Week 11 (9-12 Feb)

Benefits

This project will have a number of academic, intellectual and practical benefits for the Summer Scholar. This is an ideal project for students with an interest in imprisonment, prisoner reintegration and/or digital exclusion who might be considering undertaking further research in this area, as it will enable them to develop comprehensive, in-depth knowledge of a topic of substantial criminological and social science interest. They will also develop research and writing skills through the compilation of a literature and policy review and, under the guidance of the supervisors, will gain and develop research design skills by exploring the potential options for future research. They will co-present the research findings at a COMPASS research seminar in 2021 and be included as an author in any resulting publications. How the Summer Scholar will Advan+F52ce Supervisor’s Research.

Outcomes

Both supervisors are currently involved in a Marsden-funded study examining the role of stable housing in reducing reoffending amongst people leaving prison in New Zealand. Alice Mills is a mixed methods researcher with a substantial record of research on prisoner reintegration. Barry Milne is a quantitative researcher with extensive knowledge of – and experience with analysing and interpreting – New Zealand’s social research data. The work conducted by the Summer Scholar will advance our understanding of the challenges posed by the digital exclusion of former prisoners and how this affects the reintegration process. It will enable us to formulate a well-informed, nuanced proposal to the Marsden Fund or other funding body. Additionally, we aim to produce at least one publication based on this research and we will explore opportunities for the Scholar to present the work in appropriate fora such as the Criminology and Sociology and/or COMPASS seminar series.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Alice Mills: 2015-16 Grace Gordon (Arts); Barry Milne: 2019-20 Liam Nelson (Arts); 2019-20 Vinh-An Nguyen (Arts); 2016-17 Rebecca Grimwood (Arts); 2016-17 Irene Wu (Science); 2015-16 Clark Tipene (Arts);2015-16 Katy Fahey (Science); 2014-15 Lucy Cowie (Arts); 2014-15 Rahul Singhal (Science); 2013-14 Vera Clarkson (Science); 2012-13 Bede Maclaurin (Science); 2011-12 Emma Gullery (Science)

Climate-Induced Migration and Mobility Justice

Supervisor

Professor Andreas Neef
Dr Jesse Hession Grayman

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART003

Project

According to the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (2019), globally more than 21 million people were displaced annually between 2008 and 2018 due to climate-related hazards, within and across borders. It is widely acknowledged that climate change is a compounding factor among the social, economic and environmental drivers of displacement and migration. Prof Neef leads a new collaborative research project on “Climate-Induced Migration: Global Scope, Regional Impacts and National Policy Frameworks” that aims to contribute to a better understanding of where, how and at what scale climate-induced migration takes place in different world regions. It will do so through a structured analysis of existing studies and a global analysis of policy and legal frameworks pertaining to climate-induced migration. The findings are expected to help inform policy measures in the field of climate mobilities and improve legal frameworks at the national and international level for the protection of climate migrants. The project which is funded by the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) from 2020-2021 brings together more than 30 academics from 15 research institutions across five continents. A major output of the project will be a special issue on “Climate Mobilities and Mobility Justice” to be published in the high-impact journal “Regional Environmental Change”.

Scholar’s Work

The summer scholar is expected to conduct an extensive literature review and meta-analysis of scholarly studies on the various linkages between climate change and other drivers of international and domestic migration and displacement. The scholar will contribute to writing a peer-reviewed journal article on climate-induced migration and mobility justice as part of the special issue in “Regional Environmental Change”. The scholar will also help collecting specific information in the English-language media and development policy blogs on the relocation of Indonesia’s capital Jakarta from Java to East Kalimantan (Borneo) as a consequence of sea-level rise. The summer scholar will also help editing an article on “Planned Relocation in a Sinking Capital: Jakarta's Riverbank Kampung Resettlement” which will draw on an Indonesian student’s MA dissertation, due to be completed in November 2020.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The summer scholar should have very good academic writing skills and be proficient in the use of academic search engines, such as Google Scholar and Scopus, and referencing systems, such as Endnotes or RefWorks. The scholar should be familiar with the wider field of Development Studies and/or Migration Studies and be firmly grounded in the social sciences. A background and/or interest in climate change adaptation, climate mobilities, climate justice or disaster risk management is preferable. Applicants who are familiar with the topic of climate-induced migration and mobility justice, either through intensive prior engagement with the relevant literature or through own travel, volunteer or activist experience, will be given priority.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. 23-27 Nov, 30 Nov-4 Dec, 7-11 Dec, 14-19 Dec, 11-15 Jan, 18-22 Jan, 25-29 Jan, 2-5 Feb, 9-12 Feb, 15-19 Feb.

Benefits

The summer scholar will have the opportunity to get involved in a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional research project, thereby getting exposure to a global academic network. The scholar will be involved in a major academic writing project, leading to at least one co-authored journal article in a special issue of a high-impact international journal. While working toward these objectives, the summer scholar will receive immersive training on conducting a comprehensive meta-analysis of empirical field studies and a systematic literature review in the field of climate-induced migration and mobility justice.

Outcomes

The work of the summer scholar will make a major contribution to the success of a new, externally funded research project, conducted with a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from various universities. The work will contribute to establishing a new research field (“climate mobilities”) in the development studies disciplines and will advance the international reputation of the two supervisors. The co-authored journal article will contribute to the next PBRF round. It is also expected that the special issue – which is guest-edited by Prof Andreas Neef – will lead to future international funding opportunities in the field of migration and climate change.

Supervisors’ Previous Summer Scholars

For Prof Andreas Neef: Hala Nasr (2014/15), Lucy Benge (2015/16), Emma Wylie (2016/17; with Dr Grayman), Ngan Pham (2017/18; with Dr Grayman), Thao Dao (2018/2019; with Dr Grayman). For Dr Jesse Hession Grayman: Emma Wylie (2016/17; with Prof Neef), Kayt Bronnimann (2016/17), Joe Clifford (2017/18), Ngan Pham (2017/18; with Dr Neef), Thao Dao (2018/2019; with Prof Neef). 

Prospects for Economic Transformation in Aotearoa New Zealand

Supervisor

Associate Professor Campbell Jones
Room 951, Te Puna Mārama (Building 201E)

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART005

Project

This summer scholarship is in support of a research project studying the Prospects for Economic Transformation in Aotearoa New Zealand. This research project investigates the prospects and pathways for a transition beyond the current economic forms of neoliberal capitalism that prevail at present. It is comprised of three parts:

(1) a detailed assessment of the current economic situation in Aotearoa New Zealand and how this came into being,

(2) a systematic analysis of the currently existing proposals for future economic arrangements, from totalitarian corporate command to full communisation, and

(3) out of a critical analysis of these first two parts, a critical appraisal of these alternatives on the basis of the promises of democracy and Mātauranga Māori. While the broader research project will run over several years, the summer scholar will work as a research assistant in finalising the conception of the project, a survey of the literature in this area, and a funding bid that draws these strands together.

Scholar’s Work

This project through the summer of 2020-21 involves the preparation of a literature review and support in preparing a research funding application. Through the summer that scholar will work under the supervision of Associate Professor Campbell Jones, the Principal Investigator on this project. The work will involve bibliographic work assisting the Principal Investigator in locating, recording and coding publications on

(1) the economic history and current situation of Aotearoa New Zealand,

(2) current prospects for economic transformation in Aotearoa New Zealand, and

(3) local and international programmes for economic transformation. The summer scholar will work on reading and summarising works from the identified literature, and in doing so working with the Principal Investigator in preparing a preliminary literature review. From this, the scholar will support the preparation of a first draft of a full research grant application, from which a one page summary will be extracted and submitted to the Marsden Fund in February 2021.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The scholar for this project will ideally have a combination of three skill sets: First, training in social science research methods and an understanding of social scientific research and the process of preparing research proposals. Ideally this would involve completion of social sciences research methods courses at third year undergraduate level. Second, expertise in economic sociology and/or the critique of political economy. By preference applicants would have an interest in and knowledge of social change, political organisation and transitions beyond capitalism. Third, training and expertise in the social and economic history and context of Aotearoa New Zealand and the specificity of this country. Applicants must demonstrate familiarity with the principles of Mātauranga Māori and/or kaupapa Māori research and an understanding and appreciation of the history of colonisation and the struggle for tino rangatiratanga.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. By preference the summer scholar and supervisor would be co-located over the ten weeks from, for example, Monday 23 November to Friday 19 December 2020 (4 weeks) and from Thursday 7 January to Friday 19 February 2021 (6 weeks, taking into account public holidays), but the supervisor is able to be flexible with this timing, depending on the availability of the summer scholar.

Benefits

The scholar will be involved in the early stages of the development of a major long-term research project. The scholar will benefit by learning how a major project of this kind is conceived, which will develop skills transferrable to the conception of other major projects (such as an MA or PhD thesis). In addition to learning about the research process, the scholar will learn valuable subject knowledge and practical skills regarding time management and how to write a comprehensive literature review. This will all be done under supervision from an active publishing social scientist.

Outcomes

This summer scholar will provide invaluable background support in the preparation of this research proposal. This will free up the supervisor’s time over the summer period to attend to finalising other research outputs and conducting research supervision, and moreover to enable the supervisor to have oversight of the conception and writing of the literature review, the full research proposal and the one page summary proposal.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Summer 2016-17, Alex Birchall, research project on housing in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. The work of this summer scholar formed the background for this publication: Jones, Campbell (2018) ‘Rent, interest, profit’, Counterfutures: Left Thought and Practice Aotearoa, 6: 69-98. 

Misogyny in White Nationalism and the Risks of Extremist Violence

Supervisor

Chris Wilson

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART006

Project

The links between white nationalism and misogyny, while well known, are becoming increasingly apparent. They are also increasingly dangerous. Recent terrorist attacks taking dozens of lives in New Zealand, Sweden, the United States, Germany, Norway, Canada and elsewhere have graphically illustrated the dangerous synergy between nationalism and hatred of women (currently manifest in the phenomenon of incels – involuntary celibates). I believe that white nationalism and misogyny are not merely kindred ideologies but are synergistic, doing more to radicalize white males than they would separately. This project will examine the links between misogyny and white nationalism and how the two ideologies radicalize (most often) young white males to conduct violence against both minorities and women. The project will also examine the links between white nationalism, misogyny and several conspiracy theories which have emerged in the context of Covid-19, including those concerning 5G, government attempts to reduce the rights (and take away the firearms) of New Zealanders, the dangers of vaccines and the influence of ‘globalism’ (and the anti-Semitic undertones involved).

Scholar’s Work

The Summer Scholar will assist me to research this synergy between misogyny and white nationalism.

Task 1: The Scholar will research the history of misogyny in white nationalism, searching out and examining studies of past movements.

Task 2: The Scholar will examine information on recent terrorist attacks (such as those referred to above) in detail to uncover how the perpetrators were motivated by this combination of misogyny and nationalism. This will include reading media reports, academic studies and perpetrators manifestos (with Censor approval).

Task 3: The Scholar will monitor white nationalist and incel online forums with participation by New Zealand-based posters as a way of assessing the risks of such extremist violence here.

Task 4: The Scholar will examine the current proliferation of conspiracy theories in New Zealand by following Facebook pages (such as Free NZ) and other forums.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The Scholar should have: some knowledge of white nationalist (and potentially incel) ideology and groups as well as the processes leading to extremist radicalisation and violence; some familiarity with online chatrooms and other forums; research, writing and analytical skills and the ability to condense information into concise reports.

Timing/Weeks 

23 to 27 Nov; 30 Nov to 4 Dec; 7 to 11 Dec; 14 to 19 Dec;5 to 8 Jan; 11 to 15 Jan; 18 to 22 Jan;25 to 29 Jan; 2 to 5 Jan; 9 to 12 Jan.

Outcomes 

As mentioned, this project will lead to at least one article. The article will focus on the links between white nationalism and misogyny and their combined effect in causing political violence against minorities and women. This article will be published in a leading international journal in the field such as Terrorism and Political Violence or Studies in Conflict and Terrorism.The understudied nature of this topic and its contemporary importance mean that he project may also become part of a larger research project. I would expect that the links between misogyny and white nationalist violence would make a strong book proposal.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Katherine Skidmore 2017 – 18 assisted me research migration and conflict. That project greatly helped my current book project (currently at 80,000 words). 

The History and Organization of Fiji-West Polynesian Archaeological Collections at the University of Auckland

Supervisor

Associate Professor Ethan Cochrane (Ph 09 923 8571)

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART010

Project Description

As part of my continuing research on Fiji-West Polynesian archaeology I am investigating innovations in artefact technologies throughout the region that may have resulted from human migrations and changes in population size and distribution over the last several thousand years. Such demographic shifts have been recently identified in genetic and linguistic analyses, but remain largely unexplored archaeologically. I plan to analyse University of Auckland archaeological collections (pottery, stone and shell tools) from Fiji, Sāmoa, Tonga, Tokelau, Tuvalu, and nearby islands to identify the extent and timing of technological innovations and determine the likelihood of demographic drivers of innovation. I have confirmed that the University holds these collections. However, the current state of University archaeological collections from Fiji-West Polynesia severely hampers this research and similar projects. Most of these collections, and others from around the globe, lack a common (or any) accession system and descriptive database. Collections acquired over decades are housed in multiple locations including the Roger Green Archaeological Science Laboratory, the new Short Street collections storage, and individual staff offices. This piecemeal structure not only discourages collections-based research of staff and students, but violates our duty of care to international and local partners whose artefacts we hold.

Scholar’s Work 

Before my research can progress, I require a detailed inventory of our Fiji-West Polynesian collections, information on excavation-recovery histories, other institutional repositories, related research publications, and associated descendant groups or governmental partners. The Scholar will locate and inventory all Fiji-West Polynesian archaeological collections and associated fieldwork or analytical notes. The Scholar will input collection information into The University of Auckland archaeological collections database developed last year by Social Sciences staff member Joshua Emmitt. Information to be input in the database will include, for example, detailed text descriptions of artefact assemblages (e.g., material type, archaeological site location), digital photographs, scanned notes, associated publications, and assemblage history. Database input is an iterative process that will require the Scholar to make research-informed decisions about the lumping or splitting of units within collections and their descriptions. The Scholar will also re-box collections if necessary and all boxes will be barcoded so their current location can be tracked within the database. Archival boxes and other consumables have been obtained by Anthropology. The database is open-source and accessible online, currently password protected. The Scholar will also write a 5,000 word report of the Fiji-West Polynesian archaeological collections at The University focusing on the excavation-recovery histories of the artefacts, the principal investigators involved and research disseminated, the continuing University and investigator relationship with associated descendant communities, and the possibilities for future research and repatriation of artefacts. Importantly, the Scholar’s collections work will be integrated with similar staff and Summer Scholar work on our collections from other regions.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The Summer Scholar should have good organizational and record-keeping abilities. A familiarity with databases and the Pacific region would be helpful, but is not required. An interest in Pacific archaeology and anthropology would also be welcome.

Timing/Weeks

I will be in Auckland for the entire summer period and thus the ten weeks of co-location are negotiable.

Benefits 

The Scholar will learn now to generate and organize social sciences research data in an accessible and cumulatively-built database format. They will learn how to summarize disparate notes, materials, photographs and other data into a 5,000 word prose description. This learning will be useful for future post-graduate research in any discipline.

Outcomes

The organisation and database entry of our Fiji-West Polynesian collections will allow me to determine the best collections to analyse to continue my research on regional demographic change and artefact innovations. A summary of the Scholar’s 5,000 word history will contribute to background information in published research articles from this project. Finally, I plan to expand the Scholar’s 5,000 word history for a co-authored article in an appropriate venue such as The Journal of Pacific History or the Journal of the Polynesian Society.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars 

Gareth Walter, 2015-16; Hayley Glover, 2016-17.

The introduction history of invasive common myna birds to Aotearoa New Zealand

Supervisor

Heather Battles (Ph 09 373 7599 ext 87447)
Annabel Whibley
Anna Santure

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART012

Project Description

Common mynas were introduced from India to Australia in the 1860s, and then from Australia to Aotearoa New Zealand in the 1870s by local acclimatisation societies to help control grain pests. They have been incredibly successful at establishing in Aotearoa and globally, and are classified as one of the ‘top 100’ global invasive species due to their impacts on native ecosystems. This summer scholarship project will track the introduction and establishment of common mynas in Aotearoa, using literature searches of published journal articles and theses, historical newspaper content, and searching archives, with a particular focus on uncovering the minutes of the acclimatisation societies that introduced these birds. The project will aim to determine whether mynas were introduced once or repeatedly from Australia, and from which likely Australian ports, and whether these introductions were successful. The research will provide context for a broader study that is analysing the levels of genetic similarity in myna populations across Aotearoa in order to determine if there are signals of local adaptation as mynas established in new habitats.

Scholar’s Work

The Scholar’s work will consist of three components: The Summer Scholar will conduct a systematic literature review of the relevant literature (published journal articles, student theses, and government and conservation society reports), identified using databases available through the University Library website and the References lists of such sources. The Summer Scholar will conduct a search of the Papers Past online database of historical newspapers for relevant content, and review the identified content for information on the establishment of common myna.The Scholar will also search online databases of local and national archives to identify the locations and content of relevant acclimatisation society minutes. The results of these three components will be summarized in a statement of the extent of currently available information regarding the introduction of common myna to Aotearoa.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Although not required, desirable skills for the project include: experience using scientific / scholarly databases to find academic literature, experience using qualitative software such as NVivo, and experience in conducting systematic literature reviews.

Timing/Weeks 

30 Nov - 18 Dec, 5 Jan - 19 Feb.

Benefits 

Practice in data collection, analysis, literature reviews; Understanding of groundwork necessary to design and plan a new project; Experience working independently while under supervision as part of a larger project; Experience working as part of a collaborative scientific team; Increased knowledge of Aotearoa New Zealand history, methods of historical investigation, and potential research topics; Potential co-authorship of any resulting outputs from the work.

Outcomes 

The work of the summer scholar will establish a new collaboration with University of Auckland colleagues in the School of Biological Sciences. These colleagues have Marsden funding (2020-2022) to study the genetic changes following common myna and common starling introduction to New Zealand, and the recorded histories of these introductions will add important insight in the movements and connections of common myna populations in New Zealand.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars 

Bobbie-Leigh Dudley-Jones (2014/2015) on project “Diphtheria Mortality in Hamilton, Ontario from 1900-1924”. Supervisor: Heather Battles. Bobbie-Leigh subsequently completed a BA(Hons) and MA in Anthropology under Heather Battles’s supervision. Samantha Maitland (2019/2020) on project “History of polio among Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand.” Supervisor: Heather Battles. Samantha is currently enrolled in a BA(Hons) in Anthropology. 

Film Project Development

Supervisor

Associate Prof. Jake Mahaffy

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART014

Project Description

Fiction film project development. Assistance on several projects in various stages of development and completion. This is a multi-pronged approach to several projects in order to advance the work and move films into their next (or final) stages.

1. Build upon research and collate resources for the development of a feature film project on AI and time travel theory. This will involve reading, conducting traditional research, and collecting information and composing bibliographies (and film references) on specific topics. Additionally, editing found footage clips and basic digital fx for rip reels and proof of concepts. This work will lead to an advanced treatment and first draft screenplays for equity financing.

2. Location scouting, collecting and referencing photos/maps, permiss+F34ions, and geographical locations into a database, production support, budgeting, scheduling, coordination for a low-budget film shoot in/around Auckland.

3. Photoshop/After Effects editing and design: two multi-media projects require a student to apply effects and design (animation, filters, digital cleanup) to two different series of images for two separate multi-media projects.

4. Oversee the scanning and recording of old analogue tapes (MiniDV, VHS and 16mm and 35mm film, photographs, etc to digital.

5. Rebuild a website on Squarespace or wordpress.

Scholar’s Work

The Summer Scholar will assist supervisor as director in all aspects of development of film projects to include online research, cataloguing and compilation of materials, designing mood boards and storyboards, location scouting, writing briefs, minor editing for rip reels on Premiere, Adobe Aftereffects work and support for vfx and digital-animation proof of concepts. Rebuild a simple website. Continuing work of previous scholars and modelled on previous successful research scholarships, this work will involve multi-tasking on several projects at various stages of completion. All summer scholarships thus far have resulted in at least one completed film (feature or short) premiering at an international festival and development work on ongoing feature projects. This work familiarises students with the details of independent production in all aspects as well as taught them advanced skills for their own discipline. Development work is largely in office, or remotely and online. Production work may also be at various locations in the Auckland area.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Must be responsible, communicative, concise, reliable, have a positive attitude, self-motivated, professional. The Summer Scholar must be technically proficient in required software and post-techniques/ workflow, reliable, self-motivated, detail-oriented, have working knowledge of Photoshop, After Effects, editing in Premiere, basic graphic design skills (in relevant software), web design in HTML, wordpress and square space, and academic skills in research and composing bibliographies.

Timing/Weeks

The entire period.

Benefits to Scholar 

The Scholar will get first-hand, immersive experience in various aspects of professional, independent film production including script and project development, grant applications, funding process, pre-production, and post-production (including some editing, visual effects.) Previous summer scholars were involved in development and pre-production on 2015 Venice award-winning feature Free in Deed, 2015 Sundance and Vimeo ‘staff pick’ short film AD 1363 and 2016 Venice premiering Midwinter and the recently completed Reunion.

Outcomes 

The support and assistance provided by the scholar will allow the supervisor to bring several projects to funding application stage to secure cast and financing. The organizational work, research and creative support provided by the scholar are critical to manage the amount of work preparing materials for funding and equity investment. While the summer scholar assists in these tasks I will be able to focus on key tasks such as writing and filming. My own research will be substantially advanced with this support. Working with summer scholars in the past has been productive.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars 

Gozde Gorbuzer (PG) 2015/16 - director’s assistant developing feature projects and production/credit on Midwinter (premiered Venice 2016). Julie Zhu (UG) 2014/15 - aftereffects and animation work on ongoing installation project including work on AD 1363 (premiered Sundance 2015)Sara Davies (PG) 2013/14 - production support, locations, casting, research for Free in Deed (premiered Venice 2015), funding applications, gallery/installation contacts, budgeting, proposals, Calvin Logue (PG) 2013/14-production support, locations, casting, research for Free in Deed (premiered Venice 2015). My previous summer scholars Calvin Logue and Sarah Davies both subsequently enrolled in the MA Screen program and completed their theses. Julie Zhu subsequently enrolled in the BA Honors program in Screen. 

The Worst of All: How (and Why) to Punish Wall Street as a Criminal Gang

Supervisor

Associate Professor James Oleson (Ph 09 373 7599 ext 84522)

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART015

Project Description 

Monty Python’s short film, The Crimson Permanent Assurance, premiered in 1983 as an introduction to The Meaning of Life. Unfortunately, the film was prophetic: 25 years later, a community of financial pirates triggered a financial crash that dwarfed the Enron and savings-and-loan scandals. The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) estimates that the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2008 cost $22 trillion USD in the United States alone, with ~$8 trillion more across other world economies. The resulting great recession also had grave political and social consequences (e.g., Brexit). But while there was clear malfeasance on the part of lending institutions and the financial services industry, most corporations were deemed ‘too big to fail’ and infused with public money. Individual bad actors escaped prosecution, as well: Credit Suisse’s Kareem Serageldin was the only GFC offender to go to jail. But if Wall Street executives were understood as organised criminals, as members of a criminal gang, instead of as respectable elites, what tools would be available to prosecutors? Civil gang injunctions, asset forfeiture, RICO claims, and conspiracy liability – all hardball tools used to prosecute MS-13, the Crips, and the Mexican Mafia – also can be extended to Wall Street.

Scholar’s Work

The summer scholar selected for this project will be required to collect relevant sources on a wide number of related topics:

(1) theories about the global financial crisis/great recession, with particular attention to the aetiology of the US crash, the corporations that were involved, the people involved, the unethical/illegal behaviour that has been documented, and the details of the bailout and its socioeconomic consequences; (2) the impact of the GFC in other countries, including the UK, the EU, Australia, and New Zealand; (3) legal, sociological, and criminological research on gangs, gang formation, gang membership; (4) corresponding legal, sociological, and criminological work on organised crime; (5) the array of legal tools available in Anglophone jurisdictions to prosecute street gangs, drug trafficking networks, terror cells, and other forms of organised crime, including injunctions, criminal behavioural orders, asset forfeiture, RICO, accessory, and conspiracy, as well as alternatives such as disbarment, loss of licence, and professional disqualifications; and (6) forms of corporate punishment, including fines, stigma, and corporate death penalty.The scholar will need to quickly get up to speed with the legal/criminological dimensions of the GFC; assemble a selective bibliography (drawing upon authoritative government, NGO, academic, journalistic, and legal sources while excluding extraneous work), tracing strong citations backwards and forwards in time to saturate the field; sift bibliographic materials for statistics and quotations; and – under supervision – begin to assemble these materials into at least one socio-legal manuscript.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The essential qualities for the summer scholar are curiosity, initiative, enthusiasm, and determination. Organisational skills and a capacity for close and careful reading are highly desirable. A background in finance and/or law is desirable but not required. The project require the summer scholar to assemble and understand technical material related to financial services as well as legal theories of criminal liability. Students who have taken relevant courses or done outside reading in these areas will have an advantage.

Timing/Weeks 

The 10 weeks of research are flexible and can be tailored to the summer scholar’s availability. The available period runs from the week of 23 November through the week of 15 February. The summer scholar will be expected to generally work independently, but will be expected to meet weekly to review progress and set new targets.

Benefits 

The summer scholar will have an opportunity to hone his/her research skills, will learn about theories of criminal liability and punishment, and will learn to use a case study to inform legal policy analysis. The summer scholar also will learn about scholarly collaboration and will be allowed to co-author an academic manuscript. The supervisor hopes to publish additional work in this area (another article and a monograph), with a co-author in the UK, and if the research collaboration is fruitful, the scholar could be invited to join this writing team. The scholar will also learn about financial crime and its structural consequences. Given the havoc already wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic, it is not difficult to imagine another (greater) recession, containing a number of criminal actors. The scholar can obtain expertise that will be of great interest and utility in future crises.

Outcomes

The summer scholar will be able to assemble the raw materials that will underpin one or two academic articles. I envision a criminological/legal piece on Wall Street as a criminal gang, building upon seminal works, that argues against accommodating the crimes of the powerful (as per Eric Holder’s 1999 memo) and argues for treating Wall Street as a continuing criminal enterprise. A second article will articulate punishments that flow from this formulation, including, most interestingly, the corporate death penalty. These two articles will serve as the foundation of a co-authored socio-legal monograph already sketched out with a UK co-author.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars 

Juliet Perano, 2011, Prison and the Popular Imagination; Rachael Chappell, 2011, A Study of Criminal Genius; Samuel Jeffs, 2013, A Study of Criminal Genius.

Market-Oriented Strategy and Communication in the 2020 New Zealand General Election

Supervisor

Associate Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment
Dr. Edward Elder

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART017

Project Description 

This project will analyse the political marketing strategy and leadership communication by the New Zealand Labour Party and the New Zealand National Party in the leadup to the 2020 New Zealand General Election. This analysis will be done against two theories: a strategy focused theory the Market-Sales-Product Oriented Party Models (Lees-Marshment 2001) and communications focused theory the Contemporary Governing Leaders’ Communication Model (Elder 2016). The scholar(s) will need to firstly collect and then analyse primary sources, such as the parties’ documents, policies, transcripts, website content, public opinion data, social media and secondary sources such as media reports. They will then analyse the extent to which the political parties and their leaders use of political marketing meets the theory. This work will be used in teaching, commentary and publications. The scholar(s) may also undertake work on the preparation and formatting of a proposed book. Note: The project could accommodate two students, each focusing on one of the two core theories, as there is substantial material that can be collected and analysed and peer work will maximise motivation and learning.

Scholar’s Work

The main goal is to collect and analyse a range of material for the cases involved. This will be broken down into different research activities, for example: Review and comprehend the two core political marketing theories.Identify and collect primary sources related to market-oriented strategy and communication, such as: primary sources: party documents, policies, plans, reports, transcripts, events, website content, videos, social media; public opinion data; media articles, including quotes from the party leaders, senior politicians and staff; Party and government communication, including interviews and features in magazines and other outlets; Analyse these sources against the theory and write up analysis in summary form; Assist in the preparation and formatting of a proposed book on the 2020 New Zealand General Election.

Required Skills/Pre-Requisites

Ability to learn new cross-disciplinary concepts quickly: Awareness and understanding of political marketing; Research skills to identify a wide range of sources on the case studies; Preferable: Basic knowledge of how to use nVivo computer software; High analytical ability to be able to process and synthesise a wide range of material quickly ; Able to work independently and produce written work on time ;Strong initiative but also responsive to supervision and advice; Familiarity with New Zealand politics; Familiarity with the 2017 New Zealand Election book: Lees-Marshment, J (ed.) (2018) Political marketing and management in the 2017 New Zealand election Palgrave Macmillan pp 1-158; Especially two chapters the scholar will be working on a 2020 version of:Lees-Marshment, J (2018), ‘Messy Marketing in the 2017 New Zealand Election: the incomplete market-orientation of the Labour and National Parties’ Chapter 4 in Political marketing and management in the 2017 New Zealand election Palgrave pp. 43-65; Elder, E (2018), Chapter ‘Communicating Market-Oriented Leadership in Power and Opposition’ in Chapter 7 in Political marketing and management in the 2017 New Zealand election Palgrave pp. 99-115.

Timing/Weeks 

1. 23-27 Nov; 2. 30 Nov-4 Dec; 3. 7-11 Dec; 4. 14-19 Dec; 5. 11-15 Jan; 6. 18-22 Jan; 7. 25- 29 Jan ; 8. 2 -5 Feb (short week, Auckland Anniversary day); 9. 9-12 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 8 Feb); 10. 15-19 Feb.

Benefits to Scholar 

Participating in this research would provide the scholar(s) with the chance to develop and refine skills in research collecting (locating and archiving relevant case study material), qualitative analysis - especially thematic coding and analysis through use of the nVivo coding software. This would allow the scholar(s) the chance to gain experience identifying positive as well as negative trends in political strategy and communication. Not only will this help the scholar(s) gain or further develop valuable skills and case study knowledge that could be used in further post-graduate research, but it would also help them develop and/or refine employability skills around identifying issues through larger scale evaluation, as well as communication skills.

Outcomes 

The analysis the scholar(s) will undertake will be used in a proposed book on Political Marketing and Management in the 2020 New Zealand General Election, and reports for political practitioners. Their work will enable more in-depth primary research to be included in the book, thus improving the quality and impact of the book. This will boost the PBRF of both supervisors by enabling them to add an edited book to their publication list, and contribute to the research environment by producing research on New Zealand elections.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Summer Scholar titles under Associate Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment:2007-08: Political Marketing & US Primaries; 2009-10: Marketing in Government; 2010-11: Citizen Juries and Big societies in Downing Street; and White House Open government; 2012-13: Public input into government; Marketing Gender; 2013-14: Government, leadership and the public; 2015-16: Political Management; 2016-17: Political Management in Practice; 2017-18: Political Marketing Analysis of the 2017 NZ Election, Parties and Vote Compass; 2018-19: Political Management in Practice; 2019-2020: The Political Branding of Canadian Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau in government. 

Civil Society Actors in the Aftermath of Aid in Aceh, Indonesia

Supervisor

Dr Jesse Hession Grayman

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART019

Project Description 

The project investigates civil society involvement in reconstruction and development projects carried out in Aceh, Indonesia after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and 2005 Helsinki peace agreement, and the degree post-tsunami and post-conflict reconstruction efforts have empowered local capacities, transferred skills and knowledge, and reduced risk. Most research on post-tsunami and post-conflict Aceh was conducted during the reconstruction [2005 – 2009], with less attention paid to the long-term success/failures, and sustainability of aid and reconstruction efforts. The Summer Scholar will conduct a thematic analysis of 20 interview transcripts, in Bahasa Indonesia, with civil society leaders in Aceh. Findings will support investigations into the transformations of civil society in Aceh from the post-disaster period through present day and the extent to which civil society organizations (CSOs) created during the reconstruction have continued their work after the reconstruction. Overarching research questions include: What roles did CSOs play in Aceh prior to the tsunami? Did existing CSOs change their focus after the tsunami and become involved in the reconstruction efforts? Was there a growth in CSOs after the tsunami and reconstruction (expansion of existing ones and/or formation of new ones)? How have CSOs in Aceh changed following the end of the reconstruction efforts in 2009?

Scholar’s Work 

To provide background in support of answering these questions, the Summer Scholar will first and foremost conduct a thematic analysis of twenty interview transcripts with civil society leaders in Aceh, Indonesia. The Summer Scholar will secondarily put the findings from the thematic analysis into conversation with the existing social science literature on the role and transformations of civil society in post-disaster settings. Tasks and responsibilities include: Conduct a thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Provide concise summaries of relevant findings with key quotes. Assist with the analysis, compilation, and presentation of research findings

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The summer scholar must be fluent in Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian language). Knowledge of NVIVO or other qualitative data management software would be helpful. They should have good academic writing skills and be proficient in the use of referencing systems. They should have a background in the social sciences and have familiarity with the wider field of Development Studies or cognate disciplines such as social anthropology and geography. Applicants with experience in critical studies of either civil society and/or disaster recovery, either through intensive prior engagement with the relevant literature or through own travel, volunteer, or work experience, will receive priority.

Timing/Weeks 

All summer except 2-4 December (conference travel in Palmerston North). With advance planning, the schedule can be adjusted to meet the summer scholar’s co-location preference (e.g. accommodate the holiday season, etc.).

Benefits to Scholar

The Summer Scholar will get in depth experience in qualitative data analysis using NVIVO, identifying common themes in a set of 20 interview transcripts. The Summer Scholar will also receive immersive training on conducting a systematic library-based literature review, and on applying and integrating analytical insights to empirical data (primarily the aforementioned interview transcripts). Benefits to Summer Scholar may also include co-authorship on article findings, depending on the eventual contributions to the analysis of the data.

Outcomes

This work follows-up and completes ongoing research in Aceh, related to my PhD research on humanitarianism in Aceh, and a follow-up study on governance and civil society in post-disaster Aceh. The Summer Scholar’s support will help add new data and analytical insight to the latter chapters of my draft book manuscript, as well as one article on civil society in post-disaster Aceh.

Supervisors’ Previous Summer Scholars 

Emma Wylie (2016/17; with Prof Andreas Neef),Kayt Bronnimann (2016/17), Joe Clifford (2017/18), Ngan Pham (2017/18; with Prof Andreas Neef), Thao Dao (2018/2019; with Prof Andreas Neef). 

Archaeology of the Anthropocene

Supervisor

Prof. Melinda S. Allen (Ph 373-7599 ext 84645)
Building 201E, Office in Room 723

Discipline

Social Sciences 

Project code: ART025

Project Description 

The Anthropocene, a proposed but still debated geologic epoch, recognises the increasingly significant influences of humans on Earth’s ecosystems, landscapes, and climate. Archaeology is playing a major role in informing understanding of the historical processes that have collectively led us to this crossroad. The proposed Summer Scholar project revolves around understanding human impacts on Pacific island fauna, including extirpations, extinctions, the development of mutualisms and the rise of resource management strategies. The project is envisioned as having two components. One component will involve lab research on original archaeological materials from the central East Polynesian islands, assisting with initial assemblage sorting, databasing, consultation with specialist collaborators, and preparation of data for analysis and publication.

A second component will involve collating published information on animals translocated into East Polynesian islands by the region’s initial human settlers AND collating information on faunal extinctions that arose over the course of the Polynesian settlement period as a result of hunting, habitat loss, introduced predators, or other non-anthropogenic influences (e.g., climate change). This latter component will feed into a meta-analysis that is part of an international effort called ArchaeoGlobe Island Extinctions, that is being initiated by the Max Planck Institute. This global collaboration is using archaeological data to understand human impacts on island fauna across the planet and over the full course of human history. I am the East Polynesian regional coordinator for this project.

Scholar’s Work 

The scholar will assist in the sorting, selection and preparation of archaeological faunal samples for specialised analyses by external collaborators. The student will work alongside myself, a graduate research assistant, and also independently in our archaeological laboratories. This work may involve working with faunal reference collections, preparing sample inventories, contributing to database development, and corresponding with external specialists. This work may feed into component 2, depending on specialist findings .For component 2, the scholar will be involved in online library research, collating information on animals moved between islands by Polynesians (pigs, dogs, Polynesian rats, etc.), and on changes in native island animals as a result of human arrival and settlement. This research also will involve collating radiocarbon data from published works to reconstruct the timing of the foregoing processes.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

This position requires a motivated individual who is well organised and adept at attention to detail. Ideally the scholar will have training archaeology, some basics in faunal analysis or human osteology, along with a background in biology and/or ecology, and good quantitative skills. They should minimally have familiarity with Excel and ideally with Access. They should have good library skills as well, including knowledge of how to conduct journal and monograph searches, note-taking, and familiarity with referencing programs like Endnote or Mendeley. They also should be familiar with the basics of reporting and interpreting radiocarbon results. The individual should be comfortable working independently and also comfortable asking questions when necessary.

Timing/Weeks

23-27 Nov;30 Nov-4 Dec; 7-11 Dec;14-19 Dec; 5-8 Jan (short week New Year); 11-15 Jan; 25-29 Jan;2 -5 Feb (short week, Auckland Anniversary day);9-12 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 8 Feb); 15-19 Feb.

Benefits to Scholar

This is an excellent opportunity for a student wishing to undertake graduate study in archaeology, particularly in the areas of human palaeoecology, archaeology of the Anthropocene, and/or human ecodynamics. It will give them familiarity with a range of laboratory skills and involve them in original research. It also will give them insights into how to devise and carry out a large-scale meta-analysis. Working with other people’s data is a great way to learn how to be a more systematic and clear-thinking scholar yourself. There is the potential for the scholar to be involved in publication of project results. Also, the research supported by the proposed project is likely to results in multiple potential graduate student research projects.

Outcomes

The summer scholar will aid my on-going research of excavated collections from the southern Cook and Marquesas Islands. This research is aimed at understanding the issues outlined above in the project description and will result in publications. They will also assist me in collating data for the international ArchaeoGlobe Island Extinction project outlined above, which is anticipated to lead to one or more publications; the first ArchaeoGlobe project on human land-use was published in Science. This project, although only recently underway, is already extending my research networks well outside of my study region.

Media Transformations and Popular Music Archives

Supervisor

Associate Professor Nabeel Zuberi

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART027

Project Description 

This project develops research expertise at the intersection of these areas of scholarship: (1) music media and their formats, from vinyl records to audio and video on streaming platforms; (2) archival theories and practices, such as collecting and curating music and its material culture; and (3) the racialisation of music histories. The research questions are as follows: What are the shifting relations between physical, analogue and digital media in today’s ‘post-digital’ archiving of popular music, from institutional sites such as museums and university libraries, to databases, hard drives and personal and social media archives? How are archival materials reorganised and activated to understand the past differently, particularly in relation to racialised histories of popular music? The project engages with these questions through three case studies: British (South) Asian cultural history through the work of the music group Cornershop; the recent revival in Europe and North America of Japanese City Pop produced in the late 1970s and early 1980s during the nation’s economic boom; and the music collections of a multi-ethnic group of DJs in Aotearoa / New Zealand.

Scholar’s Work 

The scholar would search for, collect, organise and make notes summarising scholarly literature and media resources on archival theory and curating, especially in media studies, sociology and popular music studies. They would look for research material on popular music archives in museum/gallery exhibitions, libraries, websites and social media. They will compile bibliographies, webographies, videographies and discographies on this data and the three case studies: documentation about Cornershop and British Asian cultural archives; scholarly writing and media resources on Japanese City Pop and its revival via YouTube, the Vaporwave genre and music labels reissuing recordings; scholarship and media resources on DJ culture and music collections in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The scholar will transcribe several interviews with musicians and DJs. They will upload research documents to Google Drive and also collate them in hard copy. Scholars would be expected to meet with the supervisor every week for orientation to each stage of the research and discuss work in progress.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The Summer Scholar should be prepared to search library databases in the humanities and social sciences, to collect e-publications and photocopy/scan print materials, have note-taking skills for summarising the arguments of academic writing and media sources, be able to compile references in a recognised citation system such as Harvard, and be able to transcribe audio interviews. An interest in at least one of the following would be preferred: popular music; music media; archive theories and curating; cultural history; anti-racist scholarship, postcolonial discourse and decolonising methodologies.

Timing/Weeks 

23 November 2020 - 12 February 2021, or 30 November 2020 – 19 February 2021.

Benefits 

The scholar would develop theoretical and empirical knowledge of archival studies, digital media studies, popular music media studies, and critical race studies. They would learn more about ethnographic methods and gain transcription skills. They would enhance their literature reviewing skills. They would organise research data for a relatively large project for them at this stage in their academic life. With guidance from the supervisor, they would also be encouraged to develop their own research proposal on a related topic for a course paper, dissertation, thesis, independent research project or directed study in their future postgraduate studies. The supervisor will credit the scholar’s research contributions in publications.

Outcomes 

The Summer Scholarship would support a new FRDF project on the same topic for 2021-2022 that I will apply for in September 2020 with UOA Ethics approval. This research project builds on my chapter ‘Racialising Music’s Past and the Media Archive’ in The Routledge Companion to Popular Music History and Heritage (2018). The paper ‘Wogs at the Cornershop: British Asian histories through an Indie Band” has been accepted for the International Conference Keep It Simple, Make It Fast! DIY Cultures and Global Challenges (KISMIF Conference 2021), Porto, Portugal, 6-10 July. This paper will be developed for publication as a journal article and/or short book proposal. I have been approached to contribute a chapter on Japanese City Pop for Revenant Pop, a book to be edited by Sean Albiez and David Pattie in the UK. The research on DJ culture in Aotearoa will be developed into a journal article.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars 

Jenny Stuemer, Janus Currie, Son Tim Amenda Quang, Erin Rogatski, Charles Winn.

Developing an archaeological collections management strategy

Supervisor

Rebecca Phillipps (Natalie Blair Memorial Summer Scholarship in Archaeology)

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART029

Project Description 

Anthropology houses extensive archaeological collections from Aotearoa and the wider Pacific. Until now systems of collection management and conservation have developed somewhat organically based on individual staff interest. There is now an increasing interest in developing robust systems of management and care that will protect these taonga now and into the future. This includes developing protocols around processing, conservation, and storage. Protocols need to ensure compliance with heritage legislation in Aotearoa, in particular the Protected Objects Act 1976 (POA). This also includes potential return of objects to owners where appropriate. There are a number of models of best practice around the world, but Anthropology needs to develop a system that is appropriate the cultural context of the assemblages. Collection management also requires a thorough inventory of collection, but before this can be successfully undertaken, a data management system (database) must be created. A substantial part of the development of a database is gathering information about the state of the collections and information available, for example, including provenience and condition of material. Initial work has begun on the development of a data management system based around one single collection as a proof of concept, but this will need to be expanded.

Scholar’s Work

The scholars work will consist of two major tasks, 1) researching collection management practice and 2) examining the legacy collections. The scholar will carry out research on collection management, including researching best practice in Aotearoa and wider Pacific. The scholar will also investigate aspects of tikanga Māori in collection management employed by other institutions such as museums in Aotearoa. The scholar will write a 3,000 word summary of collections management practice, which will contribute to the drafting of a document on collection management for Anthropology. The scholar will also spend time in the archaeology storage facilities around campus documenting basic information about the state of the collections, focusing initially on the collections from Aotearoa. As part of this the scholar will also investigate data management practices and how archaeologists and museum curations have dealt with semantic issues in database design. The scholar will also look at existing metadata standards in the work we have completed on archaeological data management and compare this to the information available from the survey of collections. This will help us to further develop the database to account for the nature of the legacy data. This work will potentially contribute to an article on issues of legacy collection management. The scholar will also liaise with the summer scholar working on the Fiji-West Polynesia collections.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Basic familiarity with data management in archaeology, some experience in field and lab working with archaeological material, interest in collections management would be useful.

Timing/Weeks 

I will be available for the entire period so am flexible dependent on the scholar.

Benefits 

The scholar will gain knowledge of collections management practice in Aotearoa and globally, including relevant legislation. T he scholar with gain experience in archaeological collection management and the use of data management software. They will also gain experience researching semantics issues and metadata standards in archaeology. We expect that as part of the research they will contribute to a draft collections management document and potentially co-author a manuscript which will be submitted for publication. This will be a useful addition to their curriculum vitae, in addition to above skills, which are broadly applicable in the heritage industry.

Outcomes

Researching solutions to develop a collections management strategy has benefit to all the archaeologists at the University of Auckland, but it will particularly connect to my previous research on archaeological data management, including the ARCI research project. The work of the summer scholar will allow us to incorporate and formalise aspects of tikanga Maori into our collection management practice and relates to my work on this. This will also help us to address issues of archaeological data management that relate to other sources of data from a wide range of archaeological collections and grapple with issues legacy collections in particular present. This will develop my previous research on the use of legacy collections and extend this to the wider Pacific.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Carissa Donan (2011); Rose Young (2016); Patricia Pillay (2016); Natalie Blair Summer Scholar – Jennifer Graydon (2019).

Applicants for this project will also be considered for Natalie Blair Memorial Summer Scholarship in Archaeology.

Culture and Youth Justice Legislation in Aotearoa

Supervisor

Robert Webb
Tamasailau Suaalii-Sauni

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART030

Project Description 

This project takes an Indigenous criminology lens, and is interested in the way youth justice legislation in Aotearoa is informed by cultural understandings of the wellbeing of children and young persons, and how these understandings become framed in legislation over time. A particular focus is on the development of legislation such as the Children, Young Persons and their Families Act 1989, that was recently amended and renamed the Oranga Tamariki Act 1989 (Children’s and Young People’s Well-being Act 1989). This qualitative project will focus on two interrelated research questions, i) how are Māori and Pacific communities and peoples represented and framed in strategic documents and legislation developed by government agencies, and in related academic publications; and ii) to what extent (if any) do the knowledge, voices and experiences of Māori and Pacific communities influence their representation in this material.

Scholar’s Work 

The Summer Scholar will locate the body of material related to the development of youth justice legislation (submissions, committee reports, legislation, published research and scholarship about youth justice) to complete a comprehensive literature review using an agreed upon search methodology; Identify key themes related to Māori and Pacific communities, knowledge and culture; Write an informed opinion on the overall findings gained from the literature review on what can be said about the ways culture and indigenous knowledge is expressed in youth justice legislation in Aotearoa; Assist in the identification and development of major themes that could serve as the basis for journal article; Participate in a joint department seminar with the supervisors on the findings of the summer scholarship project; Maintain frequent contact with the supervisors, who will clarify aspects of the research and writing process.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Critical thinking; Basic knowledge of, and interest, in the study of youth justice legislation and policy; Strong interest in Māori and Pacific cultures; well-developed library research skills (literature search, web searches for government documents etc); the ability to identify key ideas and themes in sources they read; the ability to write clear, brief summative notes on these key ideas; Able to work independently outside of regular meetings.

Timing/Weeks 

At present we are not entirely sure what the summer period plans are but think it is likely that at least one or both of us will be available at any one time to supervise the project over this period. The start and finish dates for the project to be agreed between the student and the supervisors.

Benefits 

This project will be of specific interest to Māori and Pacific students, for those who have an interest in youth justice, and will offer capability and skill building opportunities from working under the supervision of senior academics in Criminology.How the Summer Scholar will Advance Supervisor’s Research; Outcomes (100-150 words): The Summer Scholar offers the opportunity to have related Indigenous criminology research into youth justice frameworks in Aotearoa advanced, and the opportunity to produce distinct research outputs (i.e. journal articles) related to this.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars 

Robert Webb has had no previous Summer Scholars. Tamasailau Suaalii-Sauni has had two in recent years looking at different aspects of criminology and jurisprudence. 

Review of health outcomes in Asian New Zealanders

Supervisor

Stephanie D’Souza (ext 82940)
Barry Milne (ext 89168)

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART031

Project Description 

There is limited focus on the health of the Asian population within New Zealand (NZ), despite being the third largest and fastest growing ethnic group in NZ. This is problematic, as a lack of information means this group falls off the radar for policy makers. Therefore, it is essential that we understand the health-related needs of Asian New Zealanders, to mitigate the development of a large community with unmet health needs. Adding to this issue is the broad definition of the Asian ethnic group. This definition encompasses a diverse group of individuals, who differ in many respects (e.g., languages spoken, culture, religion). The largest Asian ethnic group in NZ is Chinese, with the second largest being Indian. However, there is evidence that these two groups differ substantially in their health profiles. This project will involve conducting a literature review, to firstly identify what is known about the mental and physical health outcomes of Asian New Zealanders. This review will also investigate whether these outcomes have been evaluated separately for major Asian ethnic groups in NZ. The outcome of this review will help us identify specific areas of health that are under-studied in the Asian NZ population.

Scholar’s Work 

The scholar’s work will involve the following tasks:A literature review on the mental and physical health outcomes in Asian New Zealanders, including whether this has been investigated within major Asian NZ ethnic groups or for the Asian population overall; The review will also determine whether these studies have examined these outcomes relative to the non-Asian population in NZ.A write up of findings, in a similar format to a systematic review article; A presentation to COMPASS. The skills gained from these tasks will be important for students hoping to go into postgraduate study or a health policy/wellbeing-focused industry.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Scholars will need to have excellent oral and written communication skills and some knowledge on how to conduct a literature review and use research databases (e.g. PsychInfo, Scopus, Google Scholar).Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship (weeks during which supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland): The project duration can include any ten weeks between 23rd Nov 2020 – 19th Feb 2021.

Benefits to Scholar 

The scholar will learn a number of important skills for postgraduate study and research. These skills include: Conducting a literature review; Writing a research report and journal article; Working within a research team environment (the scholar will have access to a desk in an open plan office with postgraduate students, research assistants and analysts); Ideally, the results of the project will be written up as a journal article and submitted for publication. A successful publication will enable the scholar to get a head start on their research career.

Outcomes

D’Souza has approval for a project to look at health outcomes in Asian New Zealanders using population-level administrative data. The summer scholar’s work with help with providing an initial foundation for this research but determining where knowledge is lacking for specific health outcomes.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

D’Souza: 2019-20, Vinh-An Nguyen (Arts); 2019-20. Charlotte Svardal (Science). Milne: 2019-20. Liam Nelson (Arts);2019-20, Vinh-An Nguyen (Arts); 2016-17 Rebecca Grimwood (Arts); 2016-17 Irene Wu (Science); 2015-16 Clark Tipene (Arts); 2015-16 Katy Fahey (Science); 2014-15 Lucy Cowie (Arts); 2014-15 Rahul Singhal (Science); 2013-14 Vera Clarkson (Science); 2012-13 Bede Maclaurin (Science); 2011-12 Emma Gullery (Science).

Superfluous Injury, Unnecessary Suffering and the Regulation of War

Supervisor

Thomas Gregory

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART032

Project Description 

The principles of superfluous injury and unnecessary suffering are key components of international humanitarian law. They have been invoked to ban expanding bullets, asphyxiating gases, blinding lasers, landmines and cluster munitions. At the same time, renowned legal expert Antonio Cassese argued that these principles are ‘two of the most unclear and controversial rules of warfare… couched in such vague and uncertain terms as to be barren of practical results’. This project will consist of two parts. The first part examines how these concepts were successfully invoked to ban biological agents (1975), blinding lasers (1998), landmines (1999) and cluster munitions (2008). The second part examines how these concepts were unsuccessfully invoked by national liberation movements to draw attention to suffering and injury beyond the physical harm inflicted on the human body (e.g. environmental destruction caused by the use of defoliants in Vietnam and the social harm caused by colonialism to indigenous groups). The summer scholar will examine archival material related to these regulations to see how these concepts were invoked.

Scholar’s Work

The summer scholar will begin identifying the relevant archival material. Most will be held in online repositories at the International Committee of the Red Cross, which can be accessed remotely. There will, however, be additional archives that the summer scholar will need to track down. The second phase of research will involve the summer scholar reading through transcripts of the negotiations and related material (such as initial drafts and position statements) to identify whether the concepts of unnecessary suffering and superfluous injury were invoked, how different parties to these negotiations interpreted these principles and the extent to which they were successful in convincing states to regulate these weapons. The final phase of the project will look at the broader context, drawing on global media reports about the negotiations and government statements outside the formal negotiations to understand how these principles were being used. As part of their research, the student will be expected to produce a short report on each of the negotiations, including an appendix containing the relevant archival material.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Students will be expected to have a general knowledge of international humanitarian law, some experience conducting archival research and excellent writing skills.

Timing/Weeks 

30 November to the 19 February. Benefits to Scholar (100-150 words max) The student will gain valuable experience in a range of research skills to prepare them for PG student. I will assist them as they identify archives and conduct their archival research, whilst providing them with written feedback on their reports. There might be opportunities to co-author a paper or article on the back of this research.

Outcomes 

I am preparing a new project with Associate Professor Maartje Abbenhuis on the conceptual origins of these terms. This project will provide some important contextual information - outside the boundaries of our research - on how these principles have been used since their original inception.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Alex Edney-Browne. Emma Morris. Please confirm that you are able to be co-located and based in Auckland with your scholar during the proposed weeks of the summer research project I will be located in Auckland for the duration for this project.

Aotearoa New Zealand’s Practice of Allowing Deportees to “Organise Their Affairs” Before Deportation in Comparative Context

Supervisor

Dr Tim Fadgen (Ext 89391)

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART035

Project Description 

Current deportation law allows for individuals ordered deported be permitted time to “get their affairs in order”. This has been defined by the High Court as "organising those personal, legal or financial matters, that, by reason of personal need or obligation (legal or moral) must be attended to so that deportation will not leave the individual concerned, or those associated with him or her, disadvantaged". The Summer Scholar will perform formative research on this legal standard across the OECD and Commonwealth Countries to better understand what this means in practice in Aotearoa NZ and within broader, international context. The Summer Scholar’s research will contribute to an eventual larger study of deportee lived-experiences of putting their affairs in order as a way to feedback to policymakers about this legal provision’s performance against its stated objectives.

Scholar’s Work 

The scholar will work with Tim Fadgen to undertake the following: Search for and summarise relevant scholarly and grey literature on pre-deportation time allowances for deportees across the OECD and Commonwealth; Organise legal research from same sample of countries into accessible database; Contribute to a co-authored paper for possible publication in 2021.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The scholar should demonstrate the following:A broad knowledge of immigration politics and law, and a demonstrated interest in comparative politics and history; Have excellent research, writing, analytical, and communication skills; A capacity to work independently and as part of a team.

Timing/Weeks 

The scholar and the supervisor will be co-located in Auckland throughout the scholarship, and will involve the following weeks: 23 Nov-27 Nov; 30 Nov – 4 Dec; 7-11 Dec; 14-19 Dec; 5-8 Jan (Short week, New Years/Annual Leave); 11-15 Jan (Annual Leave); 18-22 Jan; 25-29 Jan; 2-5 Feb (short week, Auckland Anniversary Day); 9-12 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 8 Deb); 15-19 Feb ; Final submission of reports: Wednesday 24 February 2020.

Benefits to Scholar

The scholar will gain skills through involvement in all stages of the research process, from data gathering to knowledge mobilisation. In particular, the scholar will gain the following benefits:Become familiar with a range of different primary source materials; Gain additional skills in critical analysis and the writing of literature reviews; Learn to build electronic libraries/bibliographies and databases using relevant software, including RefWorks and Excel;Learn to write for academic publication, other audiences, and undertake editorial work.In addition, the research experience will add value to the student’s CV, and will improve their career opportunities and confidence about undertaking postgraduate studies.

Outcomes

The Summer Scholar’s contribution will be critical to advancing the supervisor’s growing research into immigration policy and law generally and deportation in particular. This specific legal issue has not been examined within the scholarly literature and connects to important questions about Aotearoa NZ’s view of itself as a model of affirmative immigration policies and practices within the Pacific region.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars 

2019 – 2020 – Amanda Rose-Couchman; 2018-2019 – Justin Alseben (co-supervised with Prof. Jen Curtin).

Who is at the table?: An analysis of New Zealand university council memberships

Supervisor

Dr. Sereana Naepi

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART039

Project Description 

This project aims to explore if our current university governance system embeds wider societial power imbalances by investigating who serves on university councils and recording not only their experience but also their more extensive interests. This project will contribute to a broader analysis of the New Zealand university system which has included documenting the ethnic breakdown of academics, exploring enrolment patterns across different fields, and conducting talanoa with Pacific academics. By investigating who sits on our university councils, we can analyse the various interests that sit around our highest governance table and their role in guiding our universities to be the critic and conscience of society.

Scholar’s Work 

The scholar will work with Dr Naepi to decide if they wish to do a historical analysis of two universiity’s council members and their associations or all of New Zealand university’s current council members. Utilising publically available information the scholar will investigate each council member and any commercial, political, or personal ties the council member has. The scholar will also identify how each university selects its council members, and any policy documents that outlines this selection process will be analysed. The scholar will collate each university council’s ‘purpose’ documentation. From there the scholar will collaborate with Dr Naepi to produce a journal article that weaves in their findings and Dr Naepi’s literature analysis to give us a clearer understanding of if university councils either enforce or divest from wider societal power imbalances.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

An ideal candidate will have strong writing skills and an interest in engaging with historical archives as well as online research beyond journal articles. An understanding of New Zealand university systems is not necessary, however, an interest in learning how our universities function is.

Timing/Weeks

23-27 Nov, 30 Nov-4 Dec, 7-11 Dec, 14-19 Dec, 18-22 Jan, 25- 29 Jan, 2 -5 Feb (short week, Auckland Anniversary day), 9-12 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 8 Feb), 15-19 Feb.

Benefits to Scholar 

The scholar will learn how to mix both historical and contemporary information to weave one complete story. The research will expand the scholars understanding of how universities function providing insight into their everyday experiences within the university. There will be one co-authored paper so that the scholar will learn more about the publishing process and also contribute to the scholars CV making them a stronger candidate for graduate studies. There maybe an opportunity for conference attendance to present the work at a later stage.

Outcomes

This research contributes to my growing work on the New Zealand university system and its inequities. I am hoping to produce a number of papers that enable a system wide analysis of how universities function to further entrench historical inequities. 

Ready to Run, Govern, and Lead. Diversifying who does politics and policy making

Supervisor

Professor Jennifer Curtin (Ext 87437)
Dr Sarah Bickerton
Dr Kiri Edge

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART040

Project Description 

Although women comprise 40 per cent of the representatives in our parliament, women from diverse backgrounds at local and national level remain underrepresented. Political and policy making venues would be enhanced, in terms of both process and outcome, if more Māori, Pacifica, and ethnically diverse women were elected. Research from around the world demonstrates that electing women brings new perspectives to bear on the interpretation of complex policy challenges and on ways of operating in legislative environments. Recently, it has also been found that women’s absence from politics leads voters to view government as less democratic. However, the supply of women into politics is constrained for a range of reasons, but not because of a lack of political ambition on the part of women. Rather women are more likely to wait to be asked to run, while men are more likely to self-nominate. This project will address this supply side barrier in two ways: 1) by reviewing scholarly evaluations of training programmes internationally, particularly those that seek to be inclusive of indigenous peoples and people of colour, and 2) by engaging with Indigenous, Pacifica and non-western scholarship on how best to co-design similar programmes for Aotearoa New Zealand.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will work with Jennifer Curtin, Sarah Bickerton and Kiri Edge to undertake the following:Search for and summarise relevant second order literature on gender, intersectionality and political ambition, standing for political office, and training programmes; Draw on a range of primary sources to collect and analyse data on the representation of diverse groups of women at all levels of government in the Anglo-American democracies, and their participation in relevant training programmes; Participate in online conversations with US researchers at Rutgers University and Occidental College who have been involved in researching training programmes; Undertake a stakeholder mapping exercise, and a review of co-design principles required for the development of an Aotearoa New Zealand programme;Co-author a background paper leading to a conference paper and possible publication in 2020. Work with us on a commentary piece for publication in a newspaper or on a website.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The scholar should demonstrate the following: A broad knowledge of gender politics and a demonstrated interest in New Zealand politics and policy, indigenous studies and comparative political institutions ; Have excellent research, writing, analytical and communication skills;A capacity to work independently and as part of a team.

Timing/Weeks

The scholar and the supervisor will be co-located in Auckland throughout the scholarship, and will involve the following weeks:23-27 Nov; 30 Nov-4 Dec; 7-11 Dec; 14-19 Dec; 11-15 Jan; 18-22 Jan;25- 29 Jan ; 2 -5 Feb (short week, Auckland Anniversary day); 9-12 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 8 Feb); 15-19 Feb; Final submission of reports: Wednesday 24 February 2021.

Benefits 

The scholar will gain skills through involvement in all stages of the research process, from data gathering to knowledge mobilisation. In particular, the scholar will gain the following benefits: Become familiar with a range of different primary source materials; Gain additional skills in critical analysis and the writing of literature reviews; Learn to build electronic libraries/bibliographies and databases using relevant software including RefWorks and Excel; Learn to write for academic publication, other audiences, and undertake editorial work. In addition, the research experience will add value to the student’s CV, and will improve their career opportunities and confidence about undertaking postgraduate studies.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars 

Jennifer Curtin:Rosalie Alter Shaw 2019-20; Frank Gore (with Lara Greaves) 2019-20; Vanessa Falcunitin (with PPI colleagues and Business School) 2019-2020; Justin Alsleben (with Tim Fadgen) 2018-19; Nancy Chen (with Claire Dale) 2018-19; Olive Brown 2019-19; Katherine Cammell, 2017-18; Bethan Owen 2017-18; Esme Hall (with Compass) 2017-18; Frank Lin 2016-17; Jihee Junn 2015-16; Rima Shenoy 2015-17; Kyle Simonsen (with Anita Lacey, Kathy Smits and Geoff Kemp) 2014-15;Celestyna Galicki (with Chris Wilson) 2013-14; Kate Roberts-Gray 2013-14; Caroline Ezsez 2011-12; Laura Hemingway 2011-12 ;Faisal Halabi 2010-11; Jamie Turner 2008-09; Kate Stone (with Raymond Miller) 2007-08.

Rangahau Tōrangapū o Aotearoa: Māori and the 2020 General Election

Supervisor

Dr Lara Greaves

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART043

Project Description

The New Zealand Election Study is a nationally representative postal survey of more than 3,000 New Zealanders after each general election. The survey has been running for 30 years as of the 2020 General Election. The data will be collected in September by researchers at the Public Policy Institute at the University of Auckland. People who had indicated that they were of Māori descent on the electoral roll received a Māori specific version of the survey. These questions covered everything from views on Ihumātao, to feelings around the Treaty settlements process, attitudes towards the Māori party, and iwi/hapū/marae level politics. The summer scholar will have two main tasks (1) a literature search of Māori media on Māori and the 2020 general election, focussing on what happened in the Māori electorates, and (2) a basic report with descriptive statistics on the Māori focussed sections of the 2020 New Zealand Election Study.

Scholar’s Work 

The scholar’s tasks will be to: (1) conduct a search of Māori media for key facts of what happened in the Māori electorates in 2020 and (2) create a timeline with references for important events. Then: (a) learn all about the NZ Election Study, how it was run, why we use the methods, sampling, and so on, (b) analyse the data in SPSS (training provided) and develop data analysis and data presentation skills, (c) the summer scholar will write a report presenting the analyses using tables, figures, and descriptive language, (e) the summer scholar will present and discuss these results with the investigators and the wider team. The summer scholar will be based in the Public Policy Institute and be supported to learn a variety of skills relating to the study of politics and policy.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

An understanding of Māori politics and the events of the 2020 General Election (i.e. have taken papers such as POLITICS 229, MĀORI 330/MĀORI 335 or similar). The ability to manage a list of source/media references. A willingness to work with numbers and graphs/figures/visual displays of data. Some experience with excel and/or SPSS is desirable, but training will be provided.

Timing/Weeks

Any time during the summer scholarship period.

Benefits

This summer scholarship will help the scholar to gain a number of skills that will help them in postgraduate study and get an idea of what it is like to do real research. These include skills in: project management; managing sources; seeing how surveys are run; data analysis (using SPSS/Excel) and report writing; a greater familiarity with New Zealand politics; experience working with and communication with a team (the NZES, Public Policy Institute teams)/supervisors; oral presentations skills; critical thinking skills in putting a pro-Māori lens on political events; and an extensive knowledge of the data available in the New Zealand Election Study, which is publicly available and could be used in future postgraduate work. The scholar will be hosted by the PPI and will be able to learn from our Knowledge Translation Specialist and other policy researchers located there (including Māori researchers).

Outcomes

Lara Greaves leads the operations of the NZES out of the PPI. Summer scholars working on the NZES help to contribute to the study. The summer scholar will be conducting a background review of media sources on Māori and the 2020 election for Lara Greaves’ chapter in the 2020 election book edited by Stephen Levine (an invited chapter due early in 2021). The analyses that the summer scholar completes on the data will be used in Lara Greaves and Professor Janine Hayward’s (University of Otago) chapter on Māori politics in the New Zealand Election study book on the 2020 election (edited by Jennifer Curtin).

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars 

Lara Greaves: Frank Gore (with Jennifer Curtin) 2019-2020. Liam Nelson (with Barry Milne & Marama Muru-Lanning) 2019-2020. Please confirm that you are able to be co-located and based in Auckland with your scholar during the proposed weeks of the summer research project: Lara Greaves will be based in Auckland for the whole summer.

Evidence pathways and government decision-making in response to Covid-19: a multi-country comparative analysis

Supervisor

Dr Tatjana Buklijas
Kristiann Allen
Dr Andrew Chen

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART045

Project Description

In the face of Covid-19, governments everywhere need to make urgent and difficult decisions. Even though the threat appears uniform and simultaneous, responses are remarkably different. Our research project is investigating the reasons for this diversity. How are different governments framing the problem? Which elements are they prioritizing in response to local conditions? Do the institutional settings of different jurisdictions present impediments or advantages in their respective responses? Importantly, which domains of expertise are governments engaging to help them come to decisions and shape responses? Answers to these questions are important not only to understand what worked and what didn’t in the specific Covid-19-related crisis, but also for other crises. Koi Tū – The Centre for Informed Futures, a research centre in the Faculty of Arts, is also the seat of the International Network for Government Advice, an organisation established to provide a network for practitioners in the field of science advice to governments. This project has leveraged the INGSA network to recruit national rapporteurs. Since March 2020, they have been contributing to a database (“policymaking tracker”) containing data on the types of interventions, sectors involved, and evidence or justification provided. As of 15 June 2020, this database contains over 3700 entries from 150 rapporteurs across 121 countries.

Scholar’s Work

The summer student(s) will assist the research team at the Centre in: Editing the entries in the database: the database currently has over 3700 entries from over 120 countries and we expect that it will continue to grow. With the entries collated by many rapporteurs around the world, the input needs to be checked for consistency and accuracy prior to the analysis.Keeping track of the relevant academic literature, policy reports and media. Assisting in maintaining the project website. Writing high-level summaries based on the dataset, such as understanding the different types and patterns of responses. Assisting the research team with data analysis. The policymaking tracker will be used for comparative analysis on its own but also as a springboard for the second phase of the study, which will involve ‘deep dive’ interviews with decision-makers in selected countries.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The project is suitable for students with: Interest in and broad understanding of the global context of covid-19 policy responses: Interest in qualitative research. Experience in qualitative research methods is welcome but not compulsory as the student will receive necessary training. Background (though not exclusively) in global studies, politics, law, history, sociology, journalism and related fields. Excellent communication & written skills. We also welcome the interest of students with particular interest in the politics and culture of specific world regions (ie Central America; West and Central Africa;Southeast Asia).

Timing/Weeks 

The summer studentship starts from 23 November. At least one of the co-supervisors will be available through the summer scholarship period.

Benefits

The scholar will have an opportunity to participate in a project of international significance and urgency. They will receive training and experience in designing a research project, qualitative research methods, and working in a research team. They will also have an opportunity to co-author a research publication.

Outcomes

There is an urgent need to get an understanding of the evidence used to respond to covid-19. While there is a number of project tracking the covid-19-related policy responses (e.g. Oxford Covid Policy Response, OECD Policy Response Tracker and IMF Policy Response Tracker) our project is unique in that it tracks the types of evidence used to construct these policies. The project is likely to result in a multitude of research publications and policy reports, aiming to ensure that the best available evidence is used when making decisions in crisis situations. The project has also been integrated into a very large project proposal, currently under consideration by the European Commission funding bodies, titled “Resilient and Efficient Societies towards Preparedness for Outbreaks and New normality through Science diplomacy, Evidence and Science advice” (decision to be announced in August).

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Buklijas in her previous position in the Liggins Institute: Todd Smith, Tim Salmond. Buklijas/Allen through FMHS: Deborah Hady. Allen/Chen: Sarah N Jones. Chen in his previous position in Faculty of Engineering: Jerry Fan.