Social Sciences

The Political Branding of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in government 2015-9 and the 2019 campaign

Supervisor

Assoc Prof Jennifer Lees-Marshment

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART002

Project 

In 2015 Canadians elected young and charismatic Justin Trudeau as Liberal Prime Minister. Despite a positive start with a gender-parity cabinet and declaration of sunny ways, as well as international fame. However delivering on the brand promise in government over the four year term has proved more complicated, and in 2019 Trudeau became beset by scandal. This project will conduct a case study of the effectiveness of political branding by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in his first term of office, 2015-2019. It will analyse Trudeau’s branding by collecting and assessing a wide range of primary sources including documents (e.g. speeches) and communication (e.g. Facebook posts and election adverts) against political branding theory such as brand equity and brand personality. The work will be used in a chapter ‘Branding and re-branding the New (Old) Trudeau’ for the edited book Political Marketing in the 2019 Canadian Election, contracted by Palgrave Macmillan and potentially additional articles. This is an exciting project that will suit any student interested in politics, government, communication, elections, leadership and of course political marketing itself.

Scholar’s Work 

The goal is to collect and analyse a diverse range of sources on political branding of Justin Trudeau since he was elected in 2015 through to the 2019 Canadian federal election.

  1. Review and comprehend key theories of political branding, covering brand effectiveness (Needham), brand personality (Smith), brand equity (French and Smith), policy branding (Barberio and Lowe) and re-branding (Langmaid).
  2. Review 2015 election material to describe and classify the brand Trudeau was elected on.
  3. Talk to Canadian scholars by email and skype for background context.
  4. Collect primary sources and analyse these sources against the political branding theory. Primary sources will include:a.Trudeau, his government, and the Liberal Party documents, speeches, press releases, websites, policies, plans, reports; events including listening tours, campaign launches, meetings; and media posts, images and videos on facebook, youtube, twitter, Instagram, election adverts, manifesto. b.Publicly available polling and Vote Compass data. c.Media articles that feature direct quotes from the PM, senior politicians and staff.

There are two parts to the project which would accommodate 2 scholars, or 1 scholar may work on just Part B. Part A: 2015-2018 Governing and delivering the 2015 brand: Delivering the promised 2015 brand, key events and issues e.g. gender-parity cabinet, tour of India, town hall tour. Part B: 2019 Election year, the campaign and offering a refreshed band for 2019: Developments such as Minister Wilson-Raybould scandal, ethics investigation, the new brand on offer in the campaign (running from issuing of writs in September to 21st October).

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

  • Ability to learn new cross-disciplinary concepts quickly
  • Research skills to identify a wide range of primary sources on Trudeau
  • Ability to filter – that is, with supervisory guidance, select which potential primary data sources to collect and analyse that relate to branding and are a representative sample of the 2015-2019 governing period
  • Ability to analyse multiple types of communication including written, verbal, images and audio-visual
  • High levels of analytical ability to be able to process and synthesise a wide range of material quickly
  • Able to work independently and produce written work on time
  • Strong initiative but also responsive to supervision and advice
  • Familiarity with political marketing, and political branding theory specifically, is desirable but otherwise scholars can read Political marketing: principles and applications (2nd or 3rd edition) to catch up. 
  • Familiarity with Canadian politics is desirable but otherwise a willingness to learn such as by reading key works – see below for suggestions - and paying attention to the Canadian election in October 2019 to gain a background understanding before starting the scholarship.

Timing/Weeks

The book chapter is due 1 February, and therefore the scholar needs to be able to work for the first ten possible weeks for their work to be useful:.25 Nov-29 Nov.2-6 Dec.9-13 Dec.16-20 Dec.6-10 Jan.13-17 Jan.20-24 Jan.28-31 Jan (short week, Auckland Anniversary 27 Jan).3-7 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 6 Feb)

Suggested reading

‘Canadian Election Analysis Communication, Strategy, and Democracy’ edited by Alex Marland and Thierry Giasson. Especially MacLeod, J. (2015). The Party Leader’s Image and Brand Management: Party Branding and Negative Ads in the 2015 Canadian Federal Election.

Messamore, B. J. (2016). Justin Trudeau and Canada’s 2015 Election. The Round Table, 105(1), 81-84.

The Canadian Federal Election of 2015 edited by Christopher Dornan and Jon H. Pammett (Dundurn, 2016) Chapter 3 Back to the Future: the Resurgent Liberals by Brooke Jeffrey; and Chapter 12 Polling and the 2015 Federal Election by David Coletto. Chapter 11 'Ready' in Shopping for Votes: How Politicians Choose Us and We Choose Them by Susan Delacourt - updated edition.

The Power of Political Image: Justin Trudeau, Instagram, and Celebrity Politics Mireille Lalancette and Vincent Raynauld American Behavioral Scientist (2017) pp 1 –37.

Looking for Feminist Stories in the Biographies of Women Leaders

Supervisor

Prof Jennifer Curtin

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART007

Project

Political leaders are “unusual biographical subjects” because the storytelling of their lives often starts while they are still alive, or even in office (Frank, 1999). Autobiographies written by politicians themselves are commonplace and constitute a significant part of the “construction of national history”. However, they also feed into understandings of how gender is performed in the broader political landscape (Kinnunen, 2016). For example, writing a memoir could be a mechanism used by women leaders to demonstrate competence in the public sphere, while keeping the private sphere in the shadows – a political weapon of sorts. However, there are other forms of biographical research important to the recording of women’s political careers, including Hansard, media outlets, and almanacs, amongst other sources. This project engages with this array of sources to inform a feminist biographical reading of the public-private identities and political career trajectories of fifteen women premiers in Canada and Australia.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will work with Jennifer Curtin to undertake the following:

  • Search for and summarise relevant second order literature on the feminist biography, autobiography and life writing as it applies to political women (contemporary and historical)
  • Draw on a range of primary sources to collect and analyse the biographical representations of women premiers in Australia and Canada over time
  • Participate in team meetings with a cross-national team of researchers in Canada, New Zealand and Australia who are working on women’s political careers at the subnational level
  • Co-author a background paper leading to a conference paper and possible publication in 2020
  • Work with us on a commentary piece for publication in a newspaper or on a website

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The scholar should demonstrate the following:

  • A broad knowledge of gender politics and a demonstrated interest in comparative politics and history, comparative political institutions and feminism
  • Have excellent research, writing, analytical and communication skills
  • A capacity to work independently and as part of a team. 

Timing/Weeks

The scholar and the supervisor will be co-located in Auckland throughout the scholarship, and will involve the following weeks:25 Nov-29 Nov;2-6 Dec;9-13 Dec;16-20 Dec;6-10 Jan – on annual leave;13-17 Jan;20-24 Jan;28-31 Jan (short week, Auckland Anniversary 27 Jan);3-7 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 6 Feb);10-14 Feb;17-21 Feb; Final submission of reports: Wednesday 26 February 2020

The New Zealand Election Study: How have New Zealanders’ political attitudes changed since 1990?

Supervisor

Dr Lara Greaves

Professor Jennifer Curtin

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART009

Project

In 2020 the New Zealand Election Study (NZES) will have 30 years of data on New Zealander’s political attitudes and behaviours. The NZES, which has been co-led by staff in Politics at Auckland for this time, has been one of the few consistent sources of quality political data and can be used to answer such pertinent questions as: is trust in the political system decreasing over time? Are people less interested in politics now compared to the 90s? Has contact between political parties and voters changed since social media has appeared?

Currently, the project supervisors, alongside the Centre of Methods and Policy Application in the Social Sciences (COMPASS) are undertaking a process to organise and document the study across this long history. The scholar will help with this process, and in doing so will gain marketable skills in survey research and communicating quantitative results. Namely, our goal is to produce a report similar to the Australian Election Study’s Trends in Australian Political Opinion report. The scholar will co-author the New Zealand equivalent of this report, and help to create public resources on the history of the study, which will also be used to help create future NZES surveys.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar’s tasks will be to:

  1. help with work that we are carrying out on documenting and archiving the NZES methods and questionnaires across the history of the study
  2. write summaries of the methods used in the different waves of the studies
  3. run analyses (training will be provided) on different participation, behaviour, and attitudinal variables (such as political trust, efficacy, interest and so on) and create figures and appendices
  4. write a report documenting the methods of the study, the changes in the questionnaire, and the changes in participants across the 30 years of the study
  5. present the research to an informal gathering of the research team at the Centre of Methods and Policy Application in the Social Sciences (COMPASS).

Required Skills/ Pre-requisites

  • A basic understanding of New Zealand politics and political events since the 1990s (i.e. POLITICS 107 and/or POLITICS 232/352 or another undergraduate NZ politics course)
  • The ability to communicate information to a general audience
  • A willingness to work with numbers and graphs/figures/visual displays of data
  • Some experience with excel and/or SPSS is desirable, but training will be provided

Timing/Weeks

Any time during the period.

Failed Migrations: Deportees and Public Policy in Samoa and Tonga

Supervisor

Prof Jennifer Curtin
Dr Tim Fadgen

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART010

Project

Immigration politics has become an increasingly volatile area of policy discourse in many countries. In countries that depend upon migrant outflows and migrant remittances, migration and deportation are particularly sensitive matters. In small nations, the position of returnees as both symbols of failed migrations and in the presentation of acute policy dilemmas including arriving poor, direct from prison and without language skills or an in-depth understanding of culture, compounds the resettlement difficulties these individuals face.

This project adopts a comparative case study approach to examine this issue in the small island states of Samoa and Tonga. The project examines the policy context in Samoa and Tonga using content analysis of local media coverage and other sources of returnee experience since 2009. The questions considered include:

  • How has the manner in which returnees appeared on the policy agenda in these two small island states impacted policy responses? 
  • How have both countries responded to the perceptions of returnees? 
  • How have international and regional organisations and deporting states responded, if at all, to these events? 

This project will also engage with the literature to identify viable cooperative pathways between the deporting country and country of resettlement for more effective policy coordination both pre- and post-deportation.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will work with Tim Fadgen to undertake the following:

  • Search for and summarise relevant second order literature on deportation experiences in a global context (contemporary and historical)
  • Draw on a range of data sources to collect and analyse the representation of deportees in online media sources in Samoa and Tonga
  • Assist with the research design for in-depth interviews of Tongan deportees for later portion of the project (Samoa data collection has been completed)
  • Co-author a paper leading to possible publication in 2020

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The scholar should demonstrate the following:

  • A broad knowledge of immigration politics and law, and a demonstrated interest in comparative politics and history 
  • Have excellent research, writing, analytical, and communication skills
  • A capacity to work independently and as part of a team

Timing/Weeks

The scholar and the supervisor will be co-located in Auckland throughout the scholarship, and will involve the following weeks: 25 Nov-29 Nov.2-6 Dec.9-13 Dec.16-20 Dec.6-10 Jan (Annual Leave).13-17 Jan.20-24 Jan.28-31 Jan (short week, Auckland Anniversary 27 Jan).3-7 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 6 Feb).10-14 Feb.17-21 Feb. Final submission of reports: Wednesday 26 February 2020.

Digital Tech, Youth and Mental Wellbeing: How Young People Take Care of Themselves and Others Online

Supervisor

Dr Susanna Trnka

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART011

Project

This project examines how youth (ages 14-24) across New Zealand use health apps and interactive online forums to maintain or improve health and fitness, with a focus on mental or emotional wellbeing. The project’s central aim is to understand the ramifications of using digital avenues, such as chatbots (LaVa’s Aunty Dee), anxiety/depression discussion fora (on Reddit, for example), mental health apps, for understanding and responding to one’s own and one’s peers mental health needs. The project involves interviewing medical professionals who work with youth as well as interviewing young New Zealanders about their perspectives and use of digital healthcare technologies.

With the aim of discovering the impact of new technologies on youth health practices, the summer scholar will examine issues such as:

  • how mental health apps redefine our ideas about “mental wellbeing”
  • whether mental health app use is affected by age, cultural background, sexual identity or gender
  • how youth create new kinds of identities and socialities online
  • what kinds of ethical and moral decisions young people engage in when they provide advice on mental wellbeing to others
  • how the accessibility, anonymity, and privacy of online services are reshaping young New Zealanders’ engagements with GPs and other (face-to-face) mental health services

 Scholar’s Work

The primary role of the scholar will be to assist in conducting ethnographic research on young people’s use of digital healthcare and its impact on their health and wellbeing. Priority will be placed on organizing, conducting, and transcribing interviews with both medical professionals who work with youth and with young New Zealanders, ages 14-24. Ideally, these interviews will be multi-sited: while it is envisioned that most will be located in Auckland, there will be at least one non-Auckland interview site. The scholar’s activities will include reaching out to potential interview subjects through medical offices, schools, community groups and other sites. Another aspect of the research will be to conduct online research on new mental health apps, learning how they function and interacting with other users. Another aspect of the scholar’s work will be to update and expand an Endnote database of books and articles that examine both: the use of digital technologies in healthcare; and digital cultures and socialities more broadly. Finally, the scholar will keep the supervisor up to date on new trends in mental healthcare apps and interactive web technologies.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

  • Previous interview experience is a must
  • Interest in and, ideally, prior knowledge of, digital healthcare technologies
  • Strong inter-personal skills and comfort conducting interviews with teens and adults
  • Transcription skills
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Willingness to engage in, and ideally prior experience in, data analysis. 

Timing/Weeks

The supervisor will be in Auckland for the whole period of the scholarship, with the exception of attending a conference in Vancouver, Canada on Nov 20-24. The supervisor expects the Scholar to similarly be based in Auckland for the entire period.

Income management in New Zealand: Improving financial behaviour or further marginalising the disadvantaged?

Supervisor

Assoc Prof Louise Humpage 

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART015

Project

Income management is when part of a benefit recipient’s income is quarantined to be spent only rent, utilities or at specifically-named shops and cannot be spent on alcohol, cigarettes and electronic goods. It is thus a technological ‘solution’ (via electronic surveillance and control of spending) for a purported behavioural ‘problem’ (poor spending choices, perpetuating financial dependence on the state). In New Zealand, only Youth Payment and Young Parent Payment recipients are subject to income management.

Depending on what data becomes available through pending Official Information Act requests and depending on the scholar’s particular interests, this project will focus on one or more of the following:

  • Coding/analysing qualitative interview data to examine the income management experiences of Maori Youth Payment and Young Parent Payments and whether these experiences are similar or different to those of recipients from other ethnic groups
  • Analysing Ministry of Social Development statistics about Youth Payment and Young Parent Payment recipients by age, gender, ethnicity and region, including rates of receiving incentive payments, financial sanctions and length of time on income management
  • Researching the relationship (if any) between time spent in state care/on a benefit and poor financial literacy/capability, including any ethnic differences

Scholar’s Work

The work involved will partly depend on which aspect of the project is advanced, but it is safe to say the scholar will definitely be expected to do a literature search and some analysis of either qualitative or quantitative data. This will involve working with the Supervisor to design a research question and plan, then basic training in the research skills required. The scholar will complete a short report summarizing their research findings towards the end of the project and this will be made available online. The summer project sits alongside an Australian Research Council-funded project examining compulsory income management in Australia and New Zealand. Although the scholar will focus only on New Zealand data for their own research, the project enables the scholar to engage, in a broader sense, with the larger international project (potentially participating in skype meetings held during the tenure of the scholarship and certainly accessing other research materials from the international project).

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

  • Critical thinking
  • Basic knowledge of, and interest, in the study of policy and the welfare state, in particular how both favour some and disadvantage other ethnic groups in New Zealand society
  • Strong desktop research skills (literature search, web searches for policy documents etc)
  • Able to work independently outside of weekly meetings but also willing to ask questions (by email or phone) when they are uncertain or confused
  • Experience with NVivo (for qualitative analysis) or Excel spreadsheets (for basic statistical analysis) is preferred but not required. 

Timing/Weeks

At present I am not entirely sure what my end-of-year plans are but I think it is likely we would start in November then have a longer than normal Christmas break (as I may be in Australia for part of Dec) and do most of the project in January and February. I commit to being available 10 out of the 12 weeks. 

25 Nov-29 Nov. 2-6 Dec. 9-13 Dec.16-20 Dec. 6-10 Jan. 13-17 Jan. 20-24 Jan. 28-31 Jan (short week, Auckland Anniversary 27 Jan). 3-7 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 6 Feb). 10-14 Feb.17-21 Feb.

History of polio among Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand

Supervisor

Dr Heather Battles

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART016

Project Description

This project seeks to conduct a search for and identify existing materials (scholarly literature, historical newspaper content, and archival holdings) with information about polio among Māori up to the mid-20th century. The project includes a literature review (of the published literature, primarily books, journal articles, theses/dissertations, and government/public health reports) and content review of the newspaper results. This research is intended to provide the background towards development of a larger project into the history of polio, and potentially also other so-called ‘childhood’ infectious diseases (e.g. diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever), among Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand, in collaboration with Māori scholars, students, and communities. This larger project could go beyond the published literature to include collection of oral histories, for example.

Scholar’s Work

The Scholar’s work will consist of three components:

  1. The Summer Scholar will conduct a systematic literature review of the relevant literature (published works, student theses, and government reports), identified using databases available through the University Library website and the References lists of such sources. 
  2. The Summer Scholar will conduct a search of the Papers Past online database of historical newspapers for relevant content, and review the identified content for information and themes. 
  3. The Scholar will also search online databases of local and national archives to create a list of potentially relevant holdings and their access requirements. 

The results of these three components will be summarized in a statement of the extent of currently available information regarding the history of polio among Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Ideally the applicant will have some background in Māori history and culture and come from the disciplines of Māori Studies, History, and/or Anthropology. Experience using databases and conducting literature reviews is desirable, but not required.

Timing/Weeks

2-20 Dec, 6 Jan-21 Feb

Contested Urban Futures: an ethnography of future-making in Christchurch

Supervisor

Assoc Prof Luke Goode
Prof Steve Matthewman

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART024

Project

This project investigates how Christchurch citizens imagine and narrate their hopes, fears and expectations for the future of their city. Using interviews and ethnographic methods (including video ethnography), it gives voice to a diverse range of people with multiple and often conflicting perspectives. This includes citizens from diverse backgrounds as well as stakeholders and activists involved in rebuilding and transforming Christchurch.

Drawing on a ‘critical futures’ framework, the research foregrounds the interplay of micro-, meso-, and macro-futures by exploring how citizens connect their ideas about possible, probable and preferable futures for their city to concerns surrounding their own individual life trajectories on the one hand, and global issues (for example climate change and migration) on the other. Matthewman’s recent research on the Christchurch rebuild reveals a diverse array of perspectives on the future of the city among citizens and stakeholders but also indicates that much of that diversity is rendered invisible within policy-focused debates surrounding the city rebuild.

This research will help give voice to these rich and imaginative forms of citizen ‘future-making’. We also believe the project will allow us to develop an innovative ethnographic futures methodology that could be productively applied in different cities in future research.

Scholar’s Work

Working closely with the supervisors, the scholar will participate in several different aspects of the research as follows:

  • bibliographic work that will contribute to a literature review for the project; building a project website
  • using a WordPress template, that will exist as a sub-domain of the Social Futures Research Hub website
  • organising interviews with stakeholders, interviews and activists in Christchurch
  • subject to funding* and skills/attributes of the scholar, there may be an opportunity to participate directly in fieldwork interviews with citizens, stakeholders and activists
  • subject to funding* and skills/attributes of the scholar, there may be an opportunity to be involved directly in producing (i.e. filming and/or editing) videos based on interviews with citizens, stakeholders and activists. 

*This project is the subject of a forthcoming FRDF application which will include funding for fieldwork travel.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Required:

  • experience and interest in one or more of the following areas of study: urban sociology, ethnography, futures studies, documentary studies, disaster studies
  • excellent organisational skills
  • excellent written and spoken communication skills

Preferred:

  • experience in website design and/or other forms of online media production
  • audio-visual skills (filming and/or video editing)

Timing/Weeks

The anticipated timeline for the 10-week project is as follows: Start date — December 2, 2019. End date — February 21, 2020. It may be possible to make minor adjustments to these dates to meet the needs of a suitable candidate.

Artificial Futures: A.I. and popular media

Supervisor

Assoc Prof Luke Goode

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART025

Project

Artificial Futures is a book project (with Palgrave) which explores how artificial intelligence is represented and discussed in popular media. In particular, the book examines how media coverage of A.I. serves as a vehicle for conveying more general assumptions and expectations about the future of society.

The book begins with a historical perspective, looking at the ways in which the possibilities of ‘thinking machines’ have been imagined, represented and discussed in both non-fiction (especially news media) and fiction (especially science fiction). It then looks at the contemporary scene through the lens of (a) recent science fiction and (b) popular media coverage of four case studies: digital assistants including Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Duplex; the chess and Go-playing A.I. ‘Alpha,’ produced by Google DeepMind; ‘Sophia,’ a humanoid robot produced by Hanson Robotics; and a range of zoomorphic ‘dexterous’ robots produced by Boston Dynamics.

A central theme of the book is the way in which coverage of A.I. within popular media negotiates the line between scientific credibility on the one hand, and the desire to tell dramatic and emotionally-charged stories about the future, on the other.

Scholar’s Work

Two main types of work will be undertaken by the scholar:

  • Primary data collection and analysis: the scholar will search for, collate, and organise collections of media texts relating to specific A.I.-related themes as directed by the supervisor. The scholar will also have the opportunity to work with the supervisor directly on the analysis of these texts, using qualitative methods including visual semiotics, critical discourse analysis, and frame analysis. Depending on the skills and interests of the scholar, some time may be also be spent undertaking basic quantitative content analysis. However, it should be noted that the project is primarily qualitative in approach and students who do not have skills in quantitative methods should not be deterred from applying. 
  • Bibliographic work: the scholar will search for relevant academic literature on specific A.I-related topics (as directed by the supervisor) and produce an annotated bibliography that provides both a descriptive and evaluative summary of the work.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Required:

  • an academic background in the study of media, communication and/or cultural studies
  • familiarity with qualitative textual research methods in media, communication and/or cultural studies including: visual semiotics, critical discourse analysis, frame analysis, a keen interest in new technologies such as artificial intelligence and robotics, and their potential future impacts on society (NB This does not require the successful candidate to have technical expertise in artificial intelligence besides a basic familiarity with key concepts)

Preferred:

  • familiarity with cultural and/or sociological scholarship surrounding new technologies and social impacts e.g. someone who has previously taken courses relating to one or more of the following fields: new media and society /digital cultures, the sociology of technology / science and technology studies. 

Timing/Weeks

The anticipated timeline for the 10-week project is as follows: Start date — December 2, 2019. End date - February 21, 2020. It may be possible to make minor adjustments to these dates to meet the needs of a suitable candidate.

Music, Race and Media since 9/11

Supervisor

Assoc Prof Nabeel Zuberi

Discipline

Social Sciences

Project code: ART032

Project

The project involves research on media and academic scholarship for a book monograph authored by the supervisor that is contracted to Bloomsbury in the series New Approaches to Sound, Music and Media, edited by Carol Vernallis, Holly Rogers and Lisa Perrott. The book is a series of essays that looks at how music in the UK and US has mediated the representations, discourses and affects of racialised conflict since 9/11. It takes into account more specific ideas of racial and cultural difference in popular and marginal music genre cultures such as hip hop, punk, dubstep, dance music and electronica, as well as focusing on particular musicians such as M.I.A., Das Racist, Swet Shop Boys, the Kominas, Vatican Shadow, Mutamassik, Fatima Al Qadiri and Zayn Malik.

The transnational cultural studies approach of the book draws on themes of terrorism, security, surveillance, sonic warfare, resistance, orientalism, multiculturalism, cosmopolitanism and cultural identity. The media studies approach grounds the music in the materiality of media technologies during a period of significant changes in production, distribution and listening. The chapters discuss performances, recordings, music formats, graphic design and artwork, music videos and films, interviews, journalism and social media. The book engages with recent scholarship in media and communication studies, popular music studies, sound studies, ethnomusicology and sociology.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar would primarily be searching for, collecting and reading/viewing/listening to media discourse about the music and musicians in this project, finding and organizing academic scholarship on them, and thinking about the relationship between music, race and media since September 11, 2001. The latter would help the supervisor in connecting the discrete essays as chapters in the book.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The scholar should have a good knowledge of using the University’s library databases, like doing online research, should be willing to organize research-related documents and links for digital access, and be keen to engage in conversation about race, music and media since 9/11. Ideally the scholar should have taken any course that has dealt with any of the following areas: media and communication, cultural studies, race, ethnicity or music.

Timing/Weeks

Any ten working weeks in the period 25 November 2019 to 21 February 2020

Assessing indigenous participation in the International Social Survey Programme

Supervisor

Dr Barry Milne
Dr Marama Muru-Lanning
Dr Lara Greaves

Discipline

Social Sciences (COMPASS)

Project code: ART026

Project

The International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) is an international grouping of more than 40 countries (including New Zealand) which, since 1985, have run annual surveys on social science topics. The survey topic changes year to year, rotating on a 10-year cycle, allowing comparisons both between countries and across-time. The current rotation includes the following topics: health, family and gender roles, national identity, citizenship, work, role of government, social networks, religion, social inequalities, and environment. More than 9000 reports and papers have been written using ISSP data, but very few have had an indigenous focus. As such, it is unknown the extent to which the social attitudes of indigenous populations are similar to or different from non-indigenous populations, whether there are similarities in social attitudes between indigenous populations across countries, and the extent to which social attitudes of indigenous populations have changed over time. One potential barrier to this research is the participation of indigenous people in ISSP surveys (despite many participating countries having large indigenous minority populations).

The aim of this project is to assess indigenous participation in ISSP surveys since 1985, and assess the extent to which this level of participation lends itself to within country, cross-country, and cross-time analyses.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar’s tasks will be to:

  • identify countries which participated in ISSP for at least one survey module since 1985
  • identify the indigenous populations in these countries, and obtain data on each indigenous population’s share of their national population – this may be a complex task requiring a review of the literature
  • extract data from each ISSP survey since 1985
  • assess the number (%) of indigenous participants in each survey for countries with sizeable (>1%) indigenous populations
  • identify the extent to which ISSP research has been conducted on the specific indigenous populations identified 
  • conduct a literature search to identify if there are any barriers to obtaining survey data from the indigenous populations being investigated
  • compile the findings into a report, and present the research to an informal gathering of the research team at the Centre of Methods and Policy Application in the Social Sciences (COMPASS)

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

  • Knowledge of indigenous populations and indigenous research
  • Experience undertaking literature searches
  • Ability to use the statistical package, spss, would be beneficial, but full training on use of SPSS software will be available. 

Timing/Weeks

Any time during the period.

Investigating the association between objective and subjective measures of socioeconomic status

Supervisor

Dr Barry Milne
Dr Stephanie D'Souza

Discipline

Social Sciences (COMPASS)

Project code: ART028

Project

Our perception of our social standing is an important predictor of wellbeing; indeed perceptions of socioeconomic status can be more important than ‘objective’ measures of socioeconomic position in predicting health and wellbeing outcomes, and these perceptions are often influenced by our peers. Often subjective and objective measures are used interchangeably, but there are key differences in these measures.

This project will involve investigating the association between objective measures of social status (e.g. personal income, household income, education) and a subjective measure of social status (perception of their position in society). We will also investigate whether this association varies based on sociodemographic measures, such as age, ethnicity and gender, and how a discrepancy in objective and subjective social position may relate to health and wellbeing outcomes.

To conduct this project, we will use data from the 2018 Social Attitudes Survey. The Social Attitudes Survey is run annually in New Zealand and covers key topics that are important for social science research. The results from this project will provide an insight on whether a discrepancy occurs between objective and subjective social status, what it means for health and wellbeing, and whether this discrepancy is greater in some sociodemographic groups than others.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar’s work will involve the following tasks:

  • A literature review on the association between subjective and objective social status, and their relationship to health and wellbeing
  • Data processing and analyses
  • A write up of findings, in a similar format to a journal article
  • A presentation to COMPASS. 

The skills gained from these tasks will be important for students hoping to go into postgraduate study or a social policy/wellbeing-focused industry. This is an ideal opportunity for students to get hands on experience with research and working with quantitative data.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Scholars will need to have good oral and written communication skills and some knowledge on how to conduct a literature review and use research databases (e.g. PsychInfo, Scopus, Google Scholar). Some knowledge with statistics and statistical software (namely SPSS) is preferred.

Timing/Weeks

The project duration can include any ten weeks between 25th Nov 2019 – 21st Feb 2019.

Policy rhetoric, machine learning and the politics of immigration

Supervisor

Prof Jennifer Curtin
Dr Dulani Jayasuriya
Dr Suzanne Woodward
Mr Lincoln Dam

Discipline

Social Sciences (PPI)

Project code: ART023

Project

In 2018, annual net migration in New Zealand was 65,000 (Statistics NZ). Aotearoa has been home to many new migrants, most of whom have settled in Auckland, with 40 per cent of Aucklanders born overseas (World Population Review). Against this backdrop, immigration has been a sometimes latent, sometimes explicit, political football. This project investigates how parliamentary discourse has addressed immigration over the past 50 years, employing machine learning techniques on publicly available Hansard transcripts. Machine learning approaches have demonstrated adaptability and accuracy for automated text mining, enabling us to search for keywords and trends over time relating to immigration, and classifying key categories in the rhetoric affecting migration.

This project will foster reciprocal learning across disciplines and contribute to the literature on machine learning, textual analysis, political science, and the use of machine learning to identify policy implications in general. This is also important work because parliamentary privilege rules enable our elected officials to speak out in ways that may not be possible in the broader public sphere. In this way, our research will contribute significantly to the process of holding our representatives to account in the way they speak about those who come to New Zealand.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will work with the supervisors to undertake the following:

  • Search for and summarise relevant second order literature on Parliamentary immigration debates and legislation (contemporary and historical)
  • Run the text-mining code on the relevant Hansard documents
  • Work with supervisors to identify key words in order to categorise the parliamentary discourse, and identify historical and political trends
  • Participate in team meetings with a cross-disciplinary team of researchers in Politics and International Relations, the Business School, and the Public Policy Institute
  • Co-author a background paper leading to a conference paper and possible publication in 2020
  • Work with the supervisors on a commentary piece for publication in a newspaper or on a website

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The scholar should demonstrate the following:

  • A demonstrated interest in immigration politics and public policy
  • A broad knowledge of machine learning and quantitative, qualitative and discourse analysis
  • An ability to work with R and/or Python (preferable)
  • Have excellent research, writing, analytical and communication skills
  • A capacity to work independently and as part of a team

Timing/Weeks

The scholar and the supervisors will be co-located in Auckland throughout the scholarship, and will involve the following weeks: 25 Nov-29 Nov. 2-6 Dec. 9-13 Dec. 16-20 Dec. 6-10 Jan – on annual leave. 13-17 Jan. 20-24 Jan. 28-31 Jan (short week, Auckland Anniversary 27 Jan). 3-7 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 6 Feb). 10-14 Feb. 17-21 Feb. Final submission of reports: Wednesday 26 February 2020.

ANZ Premiership Netball online fan community (including Media coverage of the Netball World Cup, Liverpool, July 2019). With Dr Bruce - Faculty of Education

Supervisor

Dr Margaret Henley
Prof Toni Bruce

Discipline

Social Sciences; Faculty of Education

Project code: ART030

Project

The major component of this research project is a continuation of the 2015/16 Summer Scholarship. This is the final year of a four-year study researching the interrelationships between netball's fan communities, the sport and the broadcaster through the use of social media platforms during the ANZ Netball Premiership competition. In 2019 the Netball World Cup has been added to this study and the media coverage will be examined both in NZ and in the UK. The online research will be focused predominantly on Facebook, twitter and Instagram, and explore the ways in which social media is used to stimulate fan engagement by the broadcaster, the sport and by individual athletes. It will also, through the use of focus groups and online social media contact, research a range of fan communities associated with the sport linked to specific netball events. This research is linked into a wider study of the relationship between tradition broadcasting of netball and the role of social media.

A secondary component will be researching material for the Netball NZ Heritage project that is linked into my ongoing broadcasting history project. A very strong preference is for a Maori or Pasifika student who has a background in netball and has contacts within the wider netball community.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will be tracking social media sites, athlete-fan engagement and fan communities associated with New Zealand elite netball. This will include analysing data gathered by the previous Summer Scholars working on this project. It will also pull together data gathered by Henley and Bruce during the 2017-2019 ANZ netball competition. They will assist with interviews of fans and working alongside the Netball NZ and SKY Television social media teams and receive full press accreditation. A secondary component of the project will be researching material for the Netball NZ Heritage project. This will require archive and data base research and creating content for the NNZ Heritage webpage. A strong preference is for a Maori or Pasifika student who has a background in netball, contacts within the netball community and the required social media skills. Video editing skills would also be desirable to work with material in my personal archive and that of Netball NZ.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

  • High level of familiarity as a user of Facebook, twitter and Instagram and ability to use social media diagnostic tools 
  • Ability to undertake historical research in major NZ archives and data bases such as Alexander Turnbull National Archives, NZ Film and audio archives, Papers Past National Library and sourcing of provincial archival material in libraries and sports institutions
  • Oral skills to present findings to major netball professional institutions such as Netball NZ and provincial netball franchises who are participating in the project
  • An ability to access the Maori and/or pacific netball fan community is a priority for the research project this summer if a suitable scholar can be found. 

There is a possibility that an internship with Netball NZ will be developed should a suitable candidate come forward who could work on the Maori/Pasifika contribution to New Zealand netball.

Timing/Weeks

25 November – 21 February inclusive. I will be supervising the scholar over this time in conjunction with Professor Toni Bruce. The scholar will also work alongside the manager of the NNZ Heritage project on a specific research task.