Architecture and Planning

Architectural Heritage Conservation in New Zealand, 1990-2020

Supervisor

Julia Gatley

Discipline

Architecture and Planning

Project code: CAI026

Julia is involved in a multi-author book project documenting and analysing architectural heritage conservation in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific, over the last 30 years. She is taking the lead on the book’s New Zealand section. She is looking for a student who enjoyed their undergraduate ARCHHTC courses and/or will be enrolling in the MArch(Prof)HerCons programme in 2022, to undertake research assistance work for this book. It will include documentary research (literary and/or archival sources), photographic research, and potentially the re-drawing of some plans or diagrams. Full guidance on what to do will be provided.

Architectural drawing

Supervisor

Marian Macken

Discipline

Architecture and Planning

Project code: CAI027

This project will build on research on aspects of architectural drawing, for future publication.

Required skills include: proficiency with research/literature reviewing and image sourcing; knowledge of research databases and archive searches; may be some additional drawing – both digital and analogue – graphic communication skills needed.

Solar shadings in contemporary New Zealand Architecture

Supervisor

Alessandro Premier

Discipline

Architecture and Planning

Project code: CAI028

Alessandro’s project involves a publication on the local approach to solar shadings design, especially in medium-large scale buildings. Solar shading systems are often required to optimize glazing performances and they affect the design of the building envelope.

The study will involve an investigation of different resources regarding the design and application of solar shadings in New Zealand architecture in the last 20 years. The research will include literary and/or archival research and photographic research. A set of buildings in Aotearoa New Zealand will be studied.

Required skills include: good knowledge of literature search and image sourcing; good understanding of archive and database research; good knowledge of MS Office suite.

Building Simply

Supervisor

Ferdinand Oswald

Discipline

Architecture and Planning

Project code: CAI029

How should we adapt the “Building Simply” strategy to make it suitable for Auckland? “Simple” building technology approaches are often underestimated in light of existing and continually developing high-tech technologies. The Building Simply concept is part of low Global Warming Potential architecture in Germany, developed by Prof. Florian Nagler at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The Building Simply strategy reduces the operational carbon and embodied carbon of a building.

The aim of the project is to investigate how to adapt the Building Simply strategy to make it suitable for Auckland and to use that outcome for further research in the field.

The Simple Building strategy pursues a number of goals at the level of building construction that include the following: reducing the number of layers of building components; climate-friendly construction; robust building technology; long-lasting, ageing-resistant surfaces; climatically inert building components due to storage masses; adequate window areas, no solar shading devices, user ventilation; low operating costs due to low complexity of the building; separation of building services systems and building structure; using the advantages of prefabrication.

Skills: Interests and basic knowledge in sustainable architecture and building technology. Solid research and graphic design skills are a necessity, as well as the ability to write well.

The work project will run from mid-November to the end of February.

Reducing Whole-of-Life Embodied Carbon in the Example of Small-scale Timber-Frame Housings

Supervisor

Ferdinand Oswald

Discipline

Architecture and Planning

Project code: CAI030

We urgently need a Climate Change Response in the Building and Construction sector to save the planet. The NZ Government is transforming New Zealand’s building performance settings to reduce emissions and improve climate resilience. If New Zealand is to reach its goals of net Carbon Zero by 2050, the Building and Construction sector must play a major part in this, and changes must be made.

Timber frame is popular construction type for small-scale housings in New Zealand. The aim of the project is to compare timber-frame to other construction systems in relation to Whole-of-Life Embodied Carbon and determine how these New Zealand building systems must be adapted to reduce carbon emissions.

The project is part of the ongoing research into reducing the Whole-of-Life Embodied Carbon of building constructions. The outcomes will be used for further research in that field. Strategies could include the following: increase building material efficiency; reduce the carbon intensity of materials used; minimize plastic waste on construction sites; separability possibilities of building components after life-time.

Skills: Interests and basic knowledge in sustainable architecture and building technology. Solid research and graphic design skills are a necessity, as well as the ability to write well.

The work project will run from mid-November to the end of February.

Inhabitable drawings

Supervisor

Aaron Paterson & Sarosh Mulla

Discipline

Architecture and Planning

Project code: CAI031

The outcome of the SRS will form a crucial component of a 2022 Installation proposal by M. Macken, S. Mulla and A. Paterson. The researchers work focuses on inhabitable drawings and is explored through built installations and virtual reality artworks.

Require skills include technical aptitude in Unity, animation software and ability to learn motion capture technology.

The aims of the SRS research are to:

  • Examine the role of inhabitable drawings for architects in the post-digital era;
  • Explore innovative mediums of documenting built space and its inhabitation.
  • Investigate photogrammetry a means to make digital collages and dynamic architectural spaces.

Note: This project can accept up to two student participants.

A Guide to Nelson-Marlborough Architecture

Supervisor

Andrew Barrie

Discipline

Architecture and Planning

Project code: CAI033

Supported in part by a number of UoA Summer Scholarships, the Auckland Branch of the New Zealand Institute of Architects has published a series of maps of New Zealand architecture.

This scholarship project involves the research and production for a map of the Nelson and Marlborough regions. The project will begin with library-based research, fieldwork to verify the information gathered, and the layout of the map itself.

Solid research and graphic design skills are a necessity, and the ability to write well about architectural history is an advantage.

The map will be published (printing sponsored by Dulux) in early 2022 by Architecture New Zealand (the nation’s most significant architecture journal), so the work project will run mid-November to mid-February.

Bicycle Use and Infrastructure: A Meta-Analysis

Supervisor

Timothy Welch

Discipline

Architecture and Planning

Project code: CAI034

Bicycle ridership is once again growing across the globe. The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the interest in biking as an alternative to public transport and to some degree an alternative to an auto-based commute; particularly where employees have been able to work remotely at least part of the week. However, to sustain the upward momentum in ridership, local governments must encourage the development of bicycle infrastructure. However, for local governments to fund such infrastructure there must be clear evidence that the existence of such facilities results in higher levels of ridership.

This research will use meta-analysis techniques to extract information on the relationship between biking and infrastructure development from a range of past studies.

Students should have a familiarity with basic statistical analysis techniques and a willingness to learn meta-analysis techniques using statistical software (specifically, the R statistical package).

Designing at a distance: revising remote learning in architecture studios

Supervisor

Anthony Brand

Discipline

Architecture and Planning

Project code: CAI035

Out of adversity comes opportunity. Many of us have experienced remote teaching and learning first hand at some point in the last year. For students located overseas this issue is on-going. While some papers have adapted well to new online and blended modes of teaching others – like design studio – have more tangible limitations: access to materials, workspace, workshops, software, hardware, etc. video conferencing tools like Zoom have enabled students and tutors to stay in contact, but it is clear that there is a preference for physical on-site face-to-face learning: so, what it is that’s missing? What could a remote design studio offer that a physical one could not? What opportunities or advantages might there be for students taking studio online?

This position is for a research assistant to explore whether this important aspect of architectural education can still be taught successfully online, and what form this might take. The intention is to provide a more engaging and meaningful learning experience for those students who can only participate in studio teaching remotely. In the immediate future this could be applied to all design studio groups with remote students starting 2022.

This role includes: a literature review of recent successful online/remote learning models in parallel architecture and design courses; researching new software and online platforms (e.g. Gather.town), that could facilitate something like virtual studio culture; running small discussion groups with remote students to better understand their experiences, needs, and limitations; Collating this information into a research report.

Successful applicant will have strong research and communication skills (written and verbal); good grades in (architectural) design and HTC papers; (fluency in Mandarin a bonus).