Fine Arts and Design

Visual Organiser Application

Supervisor

Becca Weber & Allan Fowler

Discipline

Fine Arts and Design

Project code: CAI009

This scholarship will fund the development of a prototype of a Visual Organiser App. Through using visual metaphors this app will help visually orientated students be better organised.The role of this application is for the Prototype Direction. Through this SRS the student will direct the development of the prototype and test the effectiveness of the prototype.

The prerequisite skills are: An understanding of visual learners and their needs; An understanding of current organisers or time management systems and their advantages and disadvantages for visual learners; An understanding of appropriate metaphors for self-organisation; An ability to investigate the effectiveness of the prototype.

NFT: An investigation into the rise of crypto-art

Supervisor

Fabio Morreale & Simon Ingram

Discipline

Fine Arts and Design

Project code: CAI017

NFT (Non-Fungible Token) might be the new frontier for digital- and crypto-art creation and distribution. However, given their infancy, NFTs have so far received little academic scrutiny. Who are the artists that publish their work as NFT? Who are the collectors? What are the most popular and successful crypto-art forms? To answer these questions, the student will analyse artworks from one or more NFT markets and will conduct interviews with NFT creators, curators, and collectors.

This project is suited to a Music, Fine Arts, Design, Arts, or Computer Science student.

SALAM Micro-credential – Game Project

Supervisor

Allan Fowler

Discipline

Fine Arts and Design

Project code: CAI020

This scholarship will fund the user testing and development of a game for the SALAM Micro-credential being developed by Dance, Design, Music, and Architecture. The role of this user testing and analysis. Through this SRS, the student will test the prototype's effectiveness.

The prerequisite skills are:

  1. An understanding of visual learners and their needs
  2. User testing and analysis
  3. An ability to investigate the effectiveness of the prototype
  4. Communication with all stakeholders

Priority will be given to students from under-represented minorities.

The project will start on or before December 1, 2021, and must be completed before Semester 1, 2022.

Background:
We are developing a game for the SALAM micro-credential to help learners engage with the curriculum in a fun and engaging way. Through this SRS, we will employ a student to undertake user testing and analysis. The results of the user testing will be communicated to the development team for continuous improvement.

The successful student will help conduct user testing, which will involve setting up the test environment and getting the participants to use the game. After the game, the participant will ask the participant a series of questions (both quantitative and qualitative) to get feedback on the system in terms of its usability and effectiveness. When the testing is complete, the student will collate this information and analysis the results. These results will be communicated to the development team.

Throughout the project, the student will work with Dr. Fowler to establish the protocol, undertake the tests, and analyse the results.

Futures – a documentary film project in its initial research phase

Supervisor

Jim Speers

Discipline

Fine Arts and Design

Project code: CAI021

This project calls for a student with developed research skills interested in a desktop investigation aimed at providing initial data useful to the construction of a developed script pitch toward a filmed documentary which uses interviews to explore contemporary memories related to historical moments of cultural change.

The skills required are an ability to construct a meta-tagged record of digital and library information able to identify participants with a connection to particular historical moments that then enables the next phase of investigation to engage with their contemporary antecedents. The scope of this research is international and would suit someone interested in the intersection between geography, politics and social change.

The results of this work would contribute to the pre-script research phase of a documentary planned to be developed into a pitch for funding in 2022. The information collected would assist in the identification of the kind of story proposed as being told by the proposed documentary, the proposition around its suggested look and feel and, its potential audience.

A student useful to the project would contribute to the identification of secondary source information and might also have an interest identifying visual archive opportunities that with the potential to animate this information within the context of a documentary.

Short-run Publication

Supervisor

Joyce Campbell

Discipline

Fine Arts and Design

Project code: CAI022

Assist Campbell in the production of a short-run publication produced with a combination of large format photography, polymer plate photogravure, letterpress typesetting, laser cut, CNC routing, woodcut and monoprint.

Candidates with experience in print making technologies and book design/production preferred. Candidates will use skills acquired during the project and equipment in the Fine arts print facility and/or Campbell’s studio to produce their own publication under Campbell’s guidance.

Me Luch: Visual narratives in Indigenous textiles

Supervisor

Angus Donald Campbell & Diana Albarrán González

Discipline

Fine Arts and Design

Project code: CAI023

This project aims to communicate the ancestral knowledge of weaving techniques and pattern meanings embedded in Indigenous textiles from Mexico through a short animation (visual narrative). The applicant/s will engage in reviewing literature and visual manifestations of Mesoamerican arts and textiles, the creation of mood boards and storyboards to support the development of the animation.

The visual narrative will be based in Mayan culture from Chiapas, Mexico, showing the intersection of backstrap loom weaving, Me Luch pattern as the representation of the Mayan cosmology and the impact of Indigenous knowledge as research metaphors. This project intends to create alternatives to the disseminate of academic research to larger audiences like Indigenous communities, with special emphasis in Mesoamerica.

Skills and pre-requisite: The applicant needs to have previous experience in design-art and related software for illustration, animation and video like Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Premiere. Priority is given to Māori, Pasifika and Indigenous students to support their skills development to be used in their projects related to Indigenous knowledge.

Timing: November 15th to December 17th (5 weeks – 20 hours per week) January 18th to February 19th (5 weeks – 20 hours per week).

Prototyping culturally safe spaces in educational environments

Supervisor

Nick Konnings, Gabriela Baron & Ayla Hoeta

Discipline

Fine Arts and Design

Project code: CAI024

Throughout this project a small group of students will seek answer to the question: How could we create culturally safe spaces in educational environments?*

Using Design methodologies, students will engage in problem framing through literature reviews and secondary research. They will then plan and run a co-design workshop for University of Auckland students from the Design Program with the purpose of collective ideation and prototyping of solutions (using the Design Fablab). Students will be assigned a space to install and test their proposals and interventions. Guided by their lecturers, students will document their process and produce a written output in the form of a conference paper or, ideally, a journal article. Grey literature will also be published in student’s professional blogs.

Skills and pre-requisite:

The applicant needs to have previous experience in design software for illustration and 3-D modelling. Experience in academic copywriting will be a desirable skill.

Priority is given to Māori and Pasifika students.

Timing:

November 15th to December 17th (5 weeks – 20 hours per week)
January 18th to February 19th (5 weeks – 20 hours per week)

*This project is intended as the continuation of the work undertaken by students in the “New Zealand narratives” Design Paper, coordinated by Ayla Hoeta.

Exploring audio-visual storytelling techniques to produce a short instructional video

Supervisor

Gabriela Baron & Mairi Gunn

Discipline

Fine Arts and Design

Project code: CAI025

Students will produce an instructional video under the supervision of their tutors. This video will aid in the diffusion of the “Design for Conservation” tools that are being developed within the design program*. By creating a short tutorial video explaining how to use a design tool/model, our project will reach a larger audience and create more impact.


Throughout 10 weeks, students will apply audio-visual storytelling techniques to produce a short instructional video. Students will learn basic skills for video production:

  • researching
  • scripting
  • storyboarding
  • shotlisting
  • shooting in chosen roles
  • video and audio editing

After having this first “pilot” video, the research team will have a clear roadmap to best practices and a minimum viable product to apply for funding for video development for the whole toolkit.

Skills and pre-requisite: The applicant needs to have previous experience in graphic design software and video editing software.

Timing: November 15th to December 17th (5 weeks – 20 hours per week)
January 18th to February 19th (5 weeks – 20 hours per week)

*This project is complementary to the FRDF funded research project at ELAM- Design:
“Design for Conservation: Co-Development of strategic toolkit to facilitate innovation in environmental conservation projects“