Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education

Career preferences into postgraduate practice

Supervisor

Craig Webster
Antonia Verstappen

Discipline

Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education

Project code: MHS041

Project background and aims:
Each year since 2006, the Health Careers Pathways Project (formerly known as the University of Auckland Medical and Health Sciences Tracking Project) has collected information on career intention, and related variables from healthcare students at entry to, and exit from, their respective educational programmes. Data contained in the database relates to the disciplines of medicine, nursing, pharmacy, health science and optometry. Previous research has shown that despite different number and type of career choices in each discipline, these varied choices fall into four relatively discrete career categories in medicine, nursing, pharmacy and health science. Follow-up questionnaires have now been collected for medicine up to 6 years post-graduation. The aim of the current project is to determine whether the four-category career choice framework remains useful to model career preferences into the postgraduate years in medicine.

The specific aims for this summer studentship project include:
(1) Does the four-category career choice framework, derived from undergraduate preferences, remain useful as a model for postgraduate career preferences?
(2) If postgraduate career preferences do not fit the four-category model, can a reduced category scheme be developed for postgraduate preferences?
(3) Are there other factors at work in career preferences during the transition from undergraduate to postgraduate?

Ethics approval is not required for this summer studentship project since approval is already covered by the Health Careers Pathways Project.

Skills taught:
Use of large databases – data manipulation, cleaning and confidentiality.
Statistical analysis – summary statistics, predictive statistics, data reduction techniques, Excel, SPSS.
Writing for publication – it is intended that this project will result in a published research paper to which the student will contribute and receive authorship.

The impact of a Medical Humanities course on the secondary school community: The Student Teacher

Supervisor

AP Marcus Henning
Dr Andrea Thompson
AP Phillipa Malpas

Discipline

Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education

Project code: MHS045

Medical Humanities is seen as a key part of the education of our medical students. In this small scale study we aim to interview key stakeholders involved in the teaching of a specific subject from the NCEA health matrix to the secondary school community. This teaching is a part of ‘The Student Teacher’ medical humanities programme. It is envisaged that the study will involve interviewing six key stakeholders at a local secondary school to gauge their experiences when being taught by medical students. The interviewees will consist of two secondary school teachers and four secondary school students. In addition, we aim to interview two medical students involved in the teaching. Ethics will be obtained via The University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee. The summer student will have no conflict of interest and will assist the researchers by contacting the schools and engaging in the interview process. They will then transcribe the interviews and assist in conducting a qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts. They will then contribute to the writing of the final report by synthesizing the salient literature with the findings and making recommendations for further improvement of the course.

The skills taught would be:
• interviewing skills, audiotaping interviews and conducting the transcribing process
• reference management using endnote
• writing a literature review
• data management and use of qualitative methods of analysis
• working in a team
• writing, presentation and publication of results
• understanding the value of high quality educational evaluation methods

Is There a (W)hole in Holistic Care?

Supervisor

Dr Di Winstanley
Dr Marie Rose, Mercy Hospital
A/Prof. Marcus Henning
Dr. Yan Chen

Discipline

Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education

Project code: MHS064

How can doctors truly understand multidisciplinary care from a single discipline perspective?

Palliative Care provides whole person/holistic care in a multidisciplinary setting to those with advanced life-limiting illness.
But is there a (w)hole in holistic care? According to the Greek philosopher, Aristotle, “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.”
Gestalt psychologist, Kurt Koffka, said that "the whole is other than the sum of its parts"


This study explores the journeys and experiences of medical students and doctors who were given the opportunity to provide nursing care to patients in a holistic, palliative care setting (i.e. hospice inpatient unit). Those students who were previously involved in this scheme will be interviewed regarding their experiences and reflections whilst working in the simulated role as ‘nurse’. In addition, as part of this studentship experience the research student will themselves spend two days working as a nurse in a specialist palliative care setting (under the direct supervision and mentoring of the hospice Inpatient Unit nursing team) and will, as part of this research project document their own experiences. This person will document their experiences and reflections in a diary, which will be qualitatively analysed using a thematic analysis approach.

SKILLS TAUGHT
Interview skills and transcribing interviews
Developing interview questions
Analysing narratives and interview transcripts
Qualitative data analysis
Reviewing the salient literature

PREFERENCES: All considered but a preference for a medical student with a previous clinical background, e.g. nursing, physiotherapy background.

Email Dr. Di Winstanley in the first instance with any queries

A Systematic Review of Peer-led Interventions for Mental Health in Secondary and Tertiary Students