Nursing

Home based palliative care: Patients’ and family’s experiences of an ambulance service using video reflexive ethnography.

Supervisor

Aileen Collier
Lisa Williams

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS099

The work of the Te:Arai Palliative Care and End of Life Research Group is underpinned by a philosophy of ‘Nothing about us without us’. Dr Collier’s program of research is aimed at improving safety and quality of palliative care wherever people are cared for.

This project aims to extend the international research evidence in home based palliative care by exploring patients’ and families’ experiences of the South Australia Ambulance Service. As part of an international collaboration with an interdisciplinary team of researchers in Australia, you will work alongside Dr. Aileen Collier and Dr. Lisa Williams to: 1. Help analyse and edit patients’ and families’ filmed interviews 2. Edit and produce video clips for viewing by a range of stakeholders including the South Australian Ambulance Service as well as other online publications. 3. Help write the academic manuscript for the study.

This project would suit either a health or video/film student with excellent communication skills and confidence in his/her basic digital editing skills. Skills gained include knowledge in the theory and practice of qualitative analysis and video reflexive ethnography and writing for publication. Previous students working with our group have published first authored papers in international leading journals and been successful with prestigious external postgraduate scholarship applications. For more information about us please see the Te:Arai Palliative Care and End of Life Research Group website. Please get in touch with Aileen to discuss further.

Pedometry for measuring free living activity in public health research

Supervisor

Associate Professor Melody Smith

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS001

Objective measurement of physical activity is optimal in public health research, particularly because it reduces a range of biases associated with social desirability bias, recall issues, and comprehension. While accelerometry is the preferred method of objective activity assessment, accelerometer unit cost and complexities in data treatment preclude their use in large-scale research. Pedometers offer a useful alternative to accelerometers - they provide a simple metric (steps per day) and are more cost effective than more complex alternatives. Challenges exist with pedometer data treatment, particularly around data inclusion criteria, including how many steps per day constitute a valid day, and how many days of data are needed to generate an accurate representation of an individual's activity levels.

The objectives of this summer studentship are to conduct a literature review to understand approaches to pedometer data treatment to date, and to conduct descriptive analyses of existing pedometer data to examine the impact of differing inclusion criteria on data retention. Skills in systematically scoping literature, academic writing, descriptive data analysis, and data analysis for assessing agreement between measures will be developed through this summer studentship.

Informing physical activity measurement for a community child health intervention

Supervisor

Associate Professor Melody Smith
Yvonne Anderson

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS219

Whanau Pakari is a community health promotion service for 4-16 year old children and young people, supporting them in healthful eating and physical activity. The service is provided by Taranaki District Health Board and Sport Taranaki.

Evaluation of changes in physical activity is important to determine the intervention effectiveness in supporting healthy activity in participants. The aim of this summer studentship is to examine existing data collected with children and young people in the study, comparing accelerometer-derived physical activity with activity levels characterised using a parent survey. Agreement between the two measures will be examined, and a publication written from this work.

This summer studentship offers a unique opportunity to work with an established multi-disciplinary team in children's health promotion. Key learning opportunities include:

Data cleaning, analysis, and presentation
Literature searching and critique
Academic writing

What would make neighbourhoods better for children's independent mobility?

Supervisor

Associate Professor Melody Smith

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS220

Children's independent mobility (the ability to get around their neighbourhood without adult supervision) is important for acquisition of spatial processing skills, developing the ability to navigate risky situations, and can contribute to play, physical activity, and social connections.

Neighbourhood environments can play an integral role in promoting or hindering children's independent mobility, but knowledge in this area has been limited to date. Neighbourhoods for active kids is a mixed methods study involving over 1100 children aged 8-13 years residing across nine neighbourhoods in Auckland. The aim of this summer studentship is to use descriptive statistics to characterise the independent mobility of children in this study and the neighbourhood perceptions of their parents, and to collate information from parent's open ended responses to what they think would make their neighbourhood a better place for children to walk, cycle and scooter around independently. This is a unique opportunity to work with an existing high quality, mixed methods dataset with support from a multi-disciplinary team. It is expected at least one manuscript will be prepared for submission to an academic peer reviewed journal from this project.

Students will be supported to develop their skills in:
Literature searches
Critiquing literature
Descriptive statistics
Qualitative data coding and analysis
Presenting data in novel ways
Academic writing

Peer review with first year students: A novel learning approach for novice students

Supervisor

Cathleen Aspinall
Lisa Stewart

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS074

Project background and aims:
Peer review is an essential component of professional development and quality care, and therefore is a common feature within undergraduate nursing programmes. Benefits of peer review included the development of critical thinking and an increased opportunity for students to experience assessment for feedback and development purposes, as opposed to grade driven assessment provided solely by academics (Mulder, Pearce and Baik 2014). Within nursing education peer review is often applied within the clinical or clinical skills context, however there is a plethora of educational literature highlighting the value of reciprocal peer review for assignment writing. It has been found that students’ writing improves following a peer review process where student writers receive comments from peer reviewers and then act as reviewers to provide comments to peer writers (Cho and MacArthur 2010a; Cho et al. 2006; Gielen et al. 2010; Nelson and Schunn 2009). Despite this, there is still some concern and debate regarding the benefits, reliability and validity of peer review when students are first learning academic writing skills
The aim of this project is to determine if the use of peer review for assignment writing is an appropriate learning method for first year student nurses
The specific aims for this summer studentship project are:
(1) To determine the benefits of peer review on assignment writing skills for student nurses
(2) To determine student nurses’ perceptions of providing and receiving peer review of written assignments
(3) To identify if first year students nurses have the necessary skills and knowledge to provide meaningful peer review for assignment writing
Ethics approval for this study has already been obtained (ethics 017926 Approved 20/01/17 Expiry 20/01/20)

Skills taught:
Management of both quantitative and qualitative data sets utilising data management tools such as Excel, SPSS
Analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data sets
Writing for publication – it is intended that this project will result in a published research paper to which the student will contribute and received authorship

An integrative literature review exploring the effectiveness of simulation in undergraduate nursing education.

Supervisor

Dr Dianne Marshall
Dr Michelle Honey

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS077

AIM: Simulation-based instruction has become a widely used tool for teaching and learning clinical skills in nursing education. It is seen as a suitable alternative to traditional clinical teaching methods which may present limited clinical experience for students to practice and develop proficiency with clinical skills. The aim of this project is to undertake an integrative literature review to explore the evidence regarding the effectiveness of simulation in nursing education and produce a scholarly paper suitable for publication. During this project the student will develop skills in:
• Systematically examining multiple data bases and conducting a comprehensive literature search that is reproducible
• Creating an endnote library of suitable articles
• Presenting the outcome of the literature search as a PRISMA flowchart
• Critically appraising the strength of evidence and the quality rating for each study included in the review using an appraisal tool
• Conducting a thematic analysis to identify common themes from the studies reviewed and identify gaps in the literature for further research
• Drafting a manuscript for publication in the format of a selected peer reviewed journal.

Antibiotic prescribing practices of Registered Nurse prescribers

Supervisor

Dr Michelle Honey
Drs Gigi Lim
Dianne Marshall

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS110

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a major threat to public health worldwide (World Health Organisation, 2018). While AMR is a multifactorial phenomenon, there is a strong relationship between its development and inappropriate prescribing. Inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics occurs when medicines are not prescribed nor administered in accordance with guidelines based on scientific evidence to ensure safe, effective and economic use (Abera, Kibret, & Mulu, 2014).
A new group of registered nurses (RN) who may have great potential to influence antimicrobial use and prescribing are the RN Designated Prescribers (specialist nurses and community nurses). As new prescribers not much is known about their prescribing practices and understanding of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Understanding how prescribers approach the practice of antibiotic prescribing is important to address interventions and approaches to reduce AMR (De With et al., 2016).
The aim of this study is to explore RN Designated Prescribers practices in the prescribing of antibiotics and their views of the factors that influence prescribing decisions.
The student will be part of a project team and learn about qualitative research. It is planned that this project will result in a publication in a peer reviewed journal.
The student will
• Conduct a brief literature review
• Undertake semi-structured interviews
• Analyse qualitative data
• Draft a manuscript in the format of a selected peer reviewed journal

References
Abera, B., Kibret, M., & Mulu, W. (2014). Knowledge and beliefs on antimicrobial resistance among physicians and nurses in hospitals in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, 15(26), 1-7. doi: 10.1186/2050-6511-15-26

De With, K., Allerberger, F., Amann, S., Apfalter, P., Brodt, H.-R., Eckmanns, T., . . . Kern, W. V. (2016). Strategies to enhance rational use of antibiotics in hospital: A guideline by the German Society for Infectious Diseases. Infection, 44(3), 395-439. http://doi.org/10.1007/s15010-016-0885-z

World Health Organisation. (2018). Antimicrobial resistance.

What are the predictors of the struggling nursing student? A systematic, integrative review.

Supervisor

Dr. Kim Ward
Dr. Julia Slark

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS114

Assuring patient safety is a high priority goal within all nursing programmes. Accordingly, identifying at-risk nursing students, developing strategies to facilitate learning and success and preparing students for smooth entry into the nursing workforce is vital to the development of safe and competent professional nurses.

Anecdotally and in published studies, nursing lecturers report recognising students likely to struggle with nursing studies early in the BN programme, before any evidence of academic or vocational discord is apparent. Typically, this includes students who are academically or vocationally suited to alternative career paths. Identifying indicators of academic or career dissonance for nursing students early in their BN programme offers the opportunity to support them to succeed either in the programme or elsewhere.

Recent studies have identified predictors of academic success and indicators of academic failure, particularly in relation to clinical safety. Yet, there is limited evidence about how career dissonance and academic struggle manifest early in the nursing programme.

This integrative systematic review aims to identify from the current literature characteristics of the struggling student and those at risk of academic or vocational discord.
This project will provide an opportunity for a student to develop skills in:
• Literature search and review.
• Basic research skills including data collection methods and data quality appraisal.
• Data interpretation and presentation.
• Professional scientific writing and the publication process.

The student will be based at the School of Nursing, University of Auckland.

Palliative and End of Life Care priorities from the perspectives of Chinese people living in New Zealand

Supervisor

Jackie Robinson
Merryn Gott

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS065

Background: Palliative care has historically been provided within a Western model of health care yet the Chinese population in Auckland is expected to increase significantly over the next decade presenting significant challenges in how palliative and end of life care is provided to this population. VOICES (Views of Informal Caregivers Survey) has been implemented in the ADHB however to date responses from Chinese families has been minimal.
Aim:This project will explore the value of VOICES as a way of eliciting the views of Chinese families in palliative care in terms of content and method of collecting experiences of health services received in the last 3 months of life.
Methods: This project will involve interviewing leaders from within the Chinese community to identify priorities at the end of life and culturally appropriate methods to explore perceptions and experiences of health care delivery within the context of palliative and end of life care. Findings from this project will be used to develop an appropriate method of eliciting the views of Chinese family carers.

The student will be working alongside and publish together with international researchers and clinical leaders of the highly regarded
Te: Arai Palliative Care and End of Life Research Group. https://tearairesearchgroup.org/

SKILLS
• Communication skills
• Review of data-bases
• Data analysis
• Writing for publication

Psychiatric nurse recollections of the deinstitutionalisation of New Zealand's mental hospitals

Supervisor

Kate Prebble
Lisa Williams

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS080

The purpose of this research is to record oral histories with six psychiatric nurses who practiced during the period of deinstitutionalisation of New Zealand’s mental hospitals in the 1970s-80s. Of particular note will be the nurses’ experiences of practice within an institutional context and how this changed as their patients were relocated to the community. To date, little attention has been given to this era of mental health nursing history. The findings will illuminate how New Zealand’s deinstitutionalisation process compares to that of other countries. It will also help inform current mental health nursing policy and practice.

The student’s contribution will involve working with the primary investigator to prepare for and conduct interviews (video or audio) as well as collect and organise memorabilia from the interviews and gather vital data such as background, context and biographical information. The student will also prepare an abstract for each interview and edit video/audio clips for online publication.

This project would suit either a history or video/film student confident with a video camera and in her/his digital editing skills. Skills gained include knowledge in the theory and practice of oral history and writing for publication.

Recording our past: Recollections of the early years of the School of Nursing, UOA

Supervisor

Kate Prebble
Lisa Williams

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS176

The opening of the School of Nursing in the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences marked a significant milestone in the history of nursing education. Despite decades of discussion and debate on the topic, this was the first time that nursing education was delivered alongside medical and pharmacy education. This research will examine the developments in their historical context and ask why the changes occurred at this time and place.

The purpose of this research is to record oral histories of early members of staff and students (n=6-8) of the School of Nursing, University of Auckland. The student’s contribution will involve reviewing policy documents related to the nursing education in New Zealand during the 1990s. They will also work with the primary investigator to prepare for interviews and gather vital data such as background, context and biographical information. Following the recording, the student will prepare an abstract of each interview.

The interviews and associated photographs and memorabilia will form the basis of an online publication to mark the 20th Anniversary of the School. The findings will be contextualised within an analysis of documentary evidence of nursing education policy from the period. The published findings will fill a gap in the recent history of nursing education in New Zealand.

This project would suit a nursing or history student with particular skills or interest in historical methods.

What are the views of people with dementia regarding what they need to live well at home?

Supervisor

Lisa Williams
Merryn Gott

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS085

The purpose of this research is to explore the views of people with dementia (PWD) regarding what they need to live well at home, thereby perhaps delaying their entry into care. The student’s contribution will involve working with the primary investigator to organise and conduct up to three focus groups with PWD in order to solicit their views. The student will also be involved in transcription of the focus groups, data analysis and a report that informs future research protocols, funding proposals and academic journal articles. As the focus groups may be video recorded, this project would suit a video/film major, or other student confident with a video camera and in her/his digital editing skills.

Previous students working with our group have published first authored papers in leading international journals and been successful with prestigious external postgraduate scholarship applications. For more information about us please see: www.tearairesearchgroup.org. Please get in touch with Lisa to discuss this project further.

What gives you meaning and makes you happy? A pilot project exploring the views of people living in residential aged care about what they need to live well in advanced age

Supervisor

Lisa Williams
Michal Boyd

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS093

Our current research indicates that for some older people residing in residential aged care (RAC) sadness, depression and anxiety levels are on the increase. New approaches are needed to counter this trend and so we are seeking insight into residents’ views on what they need to live well in RAC facilities. The purpose of this research, therefore, is to explore the ways in which the co-creation of video stories with residents might be useful for uncovering their perspectives.

The student’s contributions to the research will involve working with the investigators to co-create three videos with individual residents of an Auckland RAC facility. In addition to the videos themselves, the student’s work will involve conducting background interviews, keeping field notes, helping with data analysis, researching background material essential for an academic journal article and preparing a project report.

This project would suit a video/film major, or other student confident with a video camera and in her/his digital editing skills. Skills gained include knowledge regarding issues significant to the RAC sector, the use of digital video as a research method and writing for publication.

Residential Aged Care in Auckland: Changes in bed numbers, level of care and affiliation between 1988 to 2018

Supervisor

Michal Boyd
Katherine Bloomfield

Discipline

Nursing and and Freemasons' Dept. of Geriatric Medicine

Project code: MHS135

It is well known that the population of older people is rapidly increasing. This has affected the provision of residential aged care for those that are most frail and who require 24-hour care. In 2008 our team evaluated the number and type of residential aged care beds in Auckland. We found that the number of residential aged care beds increased only 3% between 1988 and 2008 even though the population of those over 85 years older had increased 113%. This was mainly due to increased care in the community. However, since 2008, there has been a significant expansion of retirement village accommodation and with this, increased residential aged care beds. We hypothesise that the provision of residential aged care has changed dramatically in the last 10 years.

For this project, the student will use publicly available records and our previous research to explore changes in residential aged care bed number and type between 1988 and 2018 in Auckland. This will include investigation of the changes over 30 years in types and ownership of facilities and size of facilities.

This project would suit any student in medicine, nursing or other health sciences and/or students interested in older people’s care, public health and epidemiology

A systematic or Integrative review on ‘Sarcopenia as a predictor of treatment options’

Supervisor

Professor Alexandra McCarthy
Dr Bobbi Laing

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS020

Choose the methodology of a systematic or Integrative review. Use a clear and precise search and selection criteria which is described clearly so that another researcher can duplicate the searches and the study selection.

From this review (a) analyse and compare articles, identify themes and determine gaps in the current research, and draw conclusions. (b) Where applicable identify evidence based practice and describe how this can be incorporated into clinical practice.

A systematic or Integrative review ‘The effects of chemotherapy on the microbiome’

Supervisor

Professor Alexandra McCarthy
Dr Bobbi Laing

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS021

Choose the methodology of a systematic or Integrative review. Use a clear and precise search and selection criteria which is described clearly so that another researcher can duplicate the searches and the study selection.

From this review (a) analyse and compare articles, identify themes and determine gaps in the current research, and draw conclusions. (b) Where applicable identify evidence based practice and describe how this can be incorporated into clinical practice.

A systematic or Integrative review ‘The prevalence of low beta carotene and vitamin A intakes and in blood levels in people with Breast Cancer’

Supervisor

Professor Alexandra McCarthy
Dr Bobbi Laing

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS022

Choose the methodology of a systematic or Integrative review. Use a clear and precise search and selection criteria which is described clearly so that another researcher can duplicate the searches and the study selection.

From this review (a) analyse and compare articles, identify themes and determine gaps in the current research, and draw conclusions. (b) Where applicable identify evidence based practice and describe how this can be incorporated into clinical practice.

Undertake preliminary data analysis of the Patient Reported Experience Cancer (PRE-C) measure instrument.

Supervisor

Professor Alexandra McCarthy
Dr Bobbi Laing

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS023

The PRE-C instrument is a brief, reliable and flexible measure that is explicitly designed to meet the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations for outcome measurement in cancer care.

This analysis is to establish its reliability, through confirmatory factor analysis, the psychometric properties of the PRE-C with typical ambulatory cancer patients treated in New Zealand.

A systematic or Integrative review ‘Cultural Determinants of Cancer’

Supervisor

Professor Alexandra McCarthy
Dr Ofa Dewes

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS036

Choose the methodology of a systematic or Integrative review. Use a clear and precise search and selection criteria which is described clearly so that another researcher can duplicate the searches and the study selection.

From this review (a) analyse and compare articles, identify themes and determine gaps in the current research, and draw conclusions. (b) Where applicable identify evidence based practice and describe how this can be incorporated into clinical practice.

Undertake preliminary data analysis of patient support services for Auckland Cancer patients (ACS)

Supervisor

Professor Alexandra McCarthy
Dr Bobbi Laing

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS155

This analysis is to establish key variables associated with supportive care for the patient journey with cancer from a data base associated with Cancer Support Services in Auckland. (Supervisors Professor Alexandra McCarthy, Dr Bobbi Laing, ASC).

Supporting family carers with end of life caregiving: what advice would carers themselves give?

Supervisor

Professor Merryn Gott
Dr Lisa Williams

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS073

We interviewed family and whanau members who had cared for a relative who died in their 80s or older as part of the Te Pakeketanga: Living and Dying in Advanced Age study, funded by the HRC (information about the study). In addition to addressing the main study aims, we also asked carers to provide advice to others who may be in this situation in the future. The aim of this studentship is to analyse the interviews to identify key themes from the advice provided. We will disseminate the findings: 1) by creating resources to disseminate this information to carers (including a short video and leaflet); and 2) in the form of an academic paper.

We welcome applications from students with an interest in family caregiving, palliative care, gerontology, and/or the development of resources for service users to conduct this work. We welcome applications from students from a range of backgrounds, for example nursing, medicine, film and media studies, health science, sociology and human geography. Previous students working with our group have published first authored papers in international leading journals and been successful with prestigious external postgraduate scholarship applications. For more information about us please see the website. Please get in touch with Merryn to discuss further

Optimising the role of community nursing in palliative care provision: providing evidence to infom a new model of care

Supervisor

Professor Merryn Gott
Jackie Robinson

Discipline

Nursing

Project code: MHS210

The Ministry of Health has identified a need to develop new models of community-based palliative care. Community nursing services, including District Nursing, are critical providers of community palliative care. The aim of this studentship is to work in collaboration with ADHB to: 1) identify research evidence to support different models of community nurse provided palliative care; and 2) gather the views of ADHB community nurses regarding the community nurse role in palliative care provision. This work will inform service development plans within ADHB and lead to an academic publication.

We welcome applications from students with an interest in palliative care, models of care and/or nursing to conduct this work. We welcome applications from students from a range of backgrounds, for example nursing, medicine, health science, sociology and human geography. Previous students working with our group have published first authored papers in leading journals and been successful with prestigious external postgraduate scholarship applications.

More information about us. Please get in touch with Merryn to discuss further