Volunteering and mentoring

We are home to many programmes, activities, and networks that are supported by enthusiastic volunteers.

Ways to volunteer

There many ways for you to volunteer time or expertise to improve the student experience, from talking with students on campus about your career, to helping overseas alumni connect.

Participate in a PhD Project

PhD candidate Philip Sanders is looking for volunteers, 65 or older, to take part in a research study looking at the brain's ability to change in response to sensory events and how this process changes as we age.

To find out more, download the PDF below:

Get involved in a clinical trial

Play your part in furthering research and scientific discovery by volunteering in a clinical trial at the Liggins Institute. Check out current trials and studies.

Visit the clinic to help a student learn

From nutrition to optometry, the University of Auckland Clinics provide a real-world opportunity for students to put into practice what they’ve learned in the classroom. Alumni who visit the clinics will receive a high standard of service at an affordable price, and will help a student learn. See what services are on offer.

Employability Insights Programme

We are looking for University graduates currently employed in a range of fields, industries and experience levels to provide employability insights to our first-year international students. The aim is to assist our first year international students by sharing professional stories to help them understand New Zealand workplace culture and experiences.

To register your interest, email alumnivolunteer@auckland.ac.nz

The Women in Engineering Network provides female students studying engineering with a range of development opportunities, and academic support.

Women in Engineering Network

The Women in Engineering Network (WEN) is a network that builds connections between women in engineering. WEN fosters relationships between female students and professional engineers, coordinates social activities, professional development opportunities, and forums for academic support.

If you are an engineering graduate, you may want to come back to campus and share your experience with current engineering students who are launching their own professional careers.

Interested in getting involved? Contact Amanda Clinton: a.clinton@auckland.ac.nz

The CDES team.

Career Development and Employment Services (CDES)

Career Development and Employment Services regularly organises events for students where alumni talk about their careers and give advice on how they got to where they are.

You can help current students with their career direction by sharing your professional story. Even if you're unable to present in person, you may want to consider putting your hand up to be profiled on the CDES website. The more students hear about alumni career journeys, the more they understand the vast range of career pathways available to them.

To register your interest, please email: employerservices@auckland.ac.nz

The Chinese Alumni Club was launched in 2010 by Volunteer Alumni Coordinator Rachel Yang.

Volunteer Alumni Coordinators (VACs)

Volunteer alumni coordinators (VACs) are graduates from the University of Auckland who play a vital role in helping to connect alumni around the globe. With over 180,000 alumni spread all over the world, our alumni volunteers help to form and grow alumni networks in the cities where they live.

If there isn't a VAC in your area, you may want to consider being the main point of contact for University of Auckland alumni in your city, and help to bring alumni together.

VAC profile: Dr Henry Huang

Dr Henry Huang is our International Volunteer Alumni Coordinator (VAC) in Beijing.

Dr Huang graduated from the School of Architecture and Urban Planning in 2005 with a Master’s degree with first class honours, and a PhD degree in 2011. He has been a VAC for the University’s Beijing Alumni Club since 2012, where he helps to connect our community in China.

“We organise events throughout the year, including BBQs, sports events, and family dinners,” says Dr Huang.

Dr Huang got involved in volunteering because of the great memories he had at the University.

“When I came back to Beijing at the end of 2010, I really wanted to keep the memories of such a special time of my life alive.”

He uses volunteering to get together with friends and share life experiences, and believes that others should get involved in volunteering.

“When you become a Volunteer Alumni Coordinator you make many new alumni friends as well as lasting connections with the University.”

He believes that volunteering at the University of Auckland has enriched his life.

“I have made friends that have made my life richer and more colourful,” he says.

Mentoring opportunities

Past participants enjoy an anniversary event for the Women's Mentoring Programme.

Women's Mentoring Programme at the Business School

The Women’s Mentoring Programme matches female students with mentors from the University of Auckland Business School’s vast network of businesswomen. The objective of the scheme is to offer the selected mentees further professional development and the chance to benefit from the experience and industry knowledge of a mentor.

Mentors must live in Auckland and have a minimum of five years’ industry experience. To learn more, visit the Women’s Mentoring Programme website.

Hear from a mentor: Chloé Lomas

Group Marketing Manager and Graduate of Business and Information Management Chloé Lomas is in her second year of volunteering at the Business School’s Women’s Mentoring programme.

Chloé began volunteering at the University in 2015, inspired by the desire to support students by providing them with practical industry advice - something she says she would have really appreciated when she was a student.

“When I originally signed up for this I didn’t think I had enough experience. I thought I’d just give it a go - you can’t lose anything by trying,” says Chloé.

Chloé soon realised that her volunteering was about more than just sharing experience and expertise. It’s about providing her mentees with support and giving them confidence.

“It was amazing to see their progress and confidence grow. It’s awesome to know you can be a sounding board for people and they can learn a lot from you – even if you are unaware that you are being so helpful,” she continues.

It also gives mentors a chance to share their story, and shows students that there is more than one approach into a career.

“Sharing your own experience is so helpful to students. You can bounce ideas off each other and show them there are more options than just the traditional grad programme.”