Humanities

The St Petersburg Declaration of 1868 in the English-language press

Supervisor

Professor Maartje Abbenhuis

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART001

Project

The St Petersburg Declaration of 1868 was one of the first multilateral agreements that regulated the use of military weaponry on the grounds of the cruelty. The treaty was signed by nineteen states, who agreed that their armed forces would not employ explosive projectiles weighing less than 400 grammes on the grounds that they ‘uselessly aggravate the sufferings of disabled men, or render their death inevitable’ and that their employment was ‘contrary to the laws of humanity’. Legal scholars employ the Declaration as a point of origin for the development of international humanitarian law and the regulation of warfare more generally. Yet we know very little about the context of the declaration, how it came about or how it was received at the time. This summer research project focusses on the media attention given to the 1868 St Petersburg Declaration in the English-language press around the time of its creation. Using a wide array of newspaper databases, the scholar will work through a range of media reports from across the British Empire and the United States to uncover how commentators engaged with the Declaration and the concept of regulating the size, weight and wounding impact of rifle bullets.

Scholar’s Work: This project helps to train students’ historical research, analysis and writing skills. The work is split into the following components: Primary source research (250 hours): using the various newspaper databases available in the University of Auckland library, the scholar will log media engagement with the St Petersburg Declaration in a database and offer analysis/commentary of this content; Secondary source research (100 hours): using the sources available in the University of Auckland library and interloan service, the scholar will find, read and write short commentaries on the existing scholarship on the St Petersburg Declaration; Research report writing (50 hours): Mobilising all these sources, the scholar will write a research essay reflecting on their research findings, which is due at the end of the project; The scholar will be expected to attend a weekly meeting with the project supervisor to discuss progress and findings.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites: The scholar must have passed a Stage III (or higher-level) History course. This project is best suited to students who have taken courses in History, Politics and IR, or Law and are genuinely interested in working on the history of weapons and wounds. It is particularly suited to students who are looking to go on to post-graduate study in History, International Law or the Masters in Conflict and Terrorism Studies.

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship: 10 weeks from mid-November until late February, excepting the Christmas break.

Benefits to Scholar: This research project offers an ideal opportunity to expand a student’s historical research, writing and analysis skills, mentored by an experienced scholar of the history of war, diplomacy and international law. The scholar will be offered guidance on all aspects of the project, including an opportunity to discuss research findings at a weekly meeting held with the project supervisor. This project offers an ideal platform for further research at post-graduate level, especially in History (at BA(Hons) or MA level) or within the MCTS. Expectations: That they are well-organised, eager to do their best and engaged in the project.

Reshaping Aotearoa New Zealand History: The Historical Practice of Judith Binney Te Tomairangi o Te Aroha

Supervisor

Associate Professor Jennifer Frost

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART003

Project

Judith Binney Te Tomairangi o Te Aroha (1940-2011) was one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s most important and innovative historians. Tūhoe bestowed the name Te Tomairangi o Te Aroha (a little cloud of rain from heaven) in recognition of her contributions to Māori and Tūhoe history. Born in Australia, Binney earned her doctorate and pursued her career in History at the University of Auckland. As an author, editor, and contributor, she played an influential role in reshaping the field of New Zealand history. This project will trace the evolution of her historical practice. Her many publications show this change over time: from The Legacy of Guilt: A Life of Thomas Kendall (1968), a biography of a controversial early Anglican missionary to the Bay of Islands and his cross-cultural experiences with Māori, to Encircled Lands: Te Urewera, 1820–1921 (2009), a devastating history of Te Urewera and its peoples, Tūhoe and other hapū, during the first hundred years of English colonization, land confiscation, and continuous injustice. Binney’s practice of history—her questions, sources, methods, epistemology, collaborations, and forms—evolved as she explored how to represent and interpret the past. Her approach to “doing history” has much to teach all of us.

Scholar’s Work: The Summer Scholar will work on the oral history component of this project to assist with my interviews of those who worked closely with Judith Binney and can offer their experiences and perspectives on her historical practice. My research thus far has yielded voluminous source materials, from Binney’s many publications and her papers at the Alexander Turnbull Library in Wellington to her book manuscripts-in-progress at the University of Auckland Archives and published reviews of her work. After some more bibliographical work with this base of materials, I am now ready to commence with oral interviews, which the Scholar will help with planning and organizing. As this is recent history, many of Judith Binney’s colleagues, students, collaborators, and editors are still living and available for interviewing. The Scholar will help with adding to and compiling a definitive list of possible interviewees, locating and contacting them, developing questions, and helping to assemble my University’s Ethics approval application. Then, assuming Ethics approval is forthcoming, I will engage in interviewing, and the Scholar could begin abstracting/transcribing the interviews.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites: This project would best suit a Scholar who has studied history, is familiar with basic historical research, methods, and analysis, has solid writing skills, and has demonstrated the characteristics of initiative, goal-setting, and time management in their own tertiary studies. Ideally, they will have taken courses in New Zealand history, especially History 227 and History 327 Waitangi: From Treaty to Tribunal, and be familiar with te reo Māori, although this is not a requirement. The Scholar is not expected to have familiarity with conducting oral interviews.

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship: All weeks are possible, apart from the Christmas-New Year holiday, as I am teaching summer school. I can work out suitable dates with my Summer Scholar, if successful, to complete the research.

Benefits to Scholar: The academic and intellectual benefits for a Summer Scholar will involve exposure to the historical publications and practice of a leading historian of her generation. Judith Binney also contributed to the deliberations of the Waitangi Tribunal, so for a student thinking of undertaking postgraduate research in the history, politics, or law, the scholarship would provide an advantageous point of departure. Specifically, the Scholar will learn or refine their skills at judging relevant source material, summarising its historical content and significance, and planning, organizing, and abstracting oral interviews and learn about the ethics approval process.

Engaging with Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland's Past (Jonathan and Mary Mason Summer Scholarship in Auckland History)

Supervisor

Prof Linda Bryder and Dr Jess Parr

Discipline

History, School of Humanities

Project code: ART004

Project

The students will assist to advance the goals of the Auckland History Initiative (AHI), located in History, School of Humanities. The AHI seeks to engage with and capture the historical development, vibrancy and diversity of Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland and its importance to New Zealand life and beyond. Its aim is to reach beyond the University to build strong and enduring connections with Auckland’s many history and heritage institutions and communities, and to put Auckland’s history at the heart of an energetic conversation about our city. In collaboration with stakeholders including iwi, Council, central government agencies, the GLAMR sector (galleries, libraries, archives, museums and records), research institutes and local historical societies, the AHI aims to ask searching questions about Auckland’s past to understand its present and future directions. The project is also collaborating with the New Zealand History Teachers Association, pending the new school curriculum relating to New Zealand history.

Scholar’s Work: In order to help build an understanding of Auckland’s past in its multifaceted aspects, including urban, transnational, ethnic, cultural, social and environmental histories, the Scholars will work collaboratively to seek out archival material relevant to the study of Auckland history. Preliminary meetings will be held with various sectors who have already indicated a willingness to participate in this programme and have done so in the past. They include the Auckland City Council Heritage Unit, the Auckland City Library Research Centre, the Museum of Transport and Technology, and the Auckland War Memorial Museum (specifically its new Tamaki Galleries). Each Scholar will select a case study of their own choosing for which there is a set of archival records to draw on. They will spend the ten weeks of the Scholarship exploring these records to develop that case study. The outcome will be a series of short illustrated accounts (usually 3 entries of 1500 words each) that will appear on the AHI website and will be shared with the Auckland City Library Heritage website http://heritageetal.blogspot.com/, a talk in the Auckland City Library seminar series and a podcast, and possibly also a talk to the staff members of the institution in which the archives are held.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites: Some historical training will be a pre-requisite along with basic computer skills. The students will not necessarily have already engaged with primary source material but will have good analytical and writing skills and be prepared to give a presentation.

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship: November to February.

Benefits to Scholar: The Scholar will learn to navigate electronic catalogues and other history finding aids, which will prove useful grounding for further historical research at graduate level. The student will learn to read and analyse archival and other primary source material and how to use this material to tell a story. The student will also learn about the history of the local community in which he and she is currently based, furthering an interest in his or her surroundings. The student will gain useful contacts in the GLAMR sector (two of my former Scholars were subsequently offered contracts by bodies in the heritage sector to conduct further research). Being asked to present the results of their research will also increase their confidence in public speaking and engagement. The Scholar will learn to write history in an accessible way for general readers.

Expectations: The Summer Scholars will produce three illustrated short essays for the AHI website on their chosen research topic (with each essay c.1500 words). They will give a presentation in the Auckland Library’s seminar series and will present at the annual AHI Symposium in 2022 (which usually attracts an audience of around 100 people).

Applicants for this project will also be considered for the Jonathan and Mary Mason Summer Scholarship in Auckland History. There are 2 places available for this project.

Robin Hyde: The Voyage to China and Britain

Supervisor

Associate Professor Paula Morris

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART011

Project

Following the success of our book Shining Land: Looking for Robin Hyde, photographer Haru Sameshima and I are planning a follow-up, to be published by Massey University Press in 2023. It’s a multimedia project based around the letters sent by iconic NZ writer Robin Hyde (Iris Wilkinson) in 1938-39, the last two years of her short life: she travelled to China, reporting from the front line of the war with Japan, and then to England. We have the blessing of Hyde’s son, the late Derek Challis, and his widow Lyn, who has given us access to letters and other materials. The book will include archival photography and ephemera, as well as biographical information on the people with whom Hyde corresponded. It will require research at various libraries, including the Alexander Turnbull Library in Wellington. We will be assisted in locating Chinese archival photography by Zhai Shilei, an Associate Professor from China University of Mining and Technology (Jiangsu Province), who has an interest in Hyde’s China experience and writing, and is from Xuzhou, where Hyde spent six weeks in 1938, witnessing its fall to the Japanese.

Scholar’s Work: The scholar will assist with online searches of library holdings in New Zealand and the UK for relevant material, written and visual; and with biographical research into the correspondents, who range from family members to famous writers. The scholar could also assist with historical research into the places Hyde spent time (Shanghai, Hong Kong, Xuzhou). We will meet regularly with Haru Sareshima to discuss the visual material he is collecting, as this is an artistic as well as scholarly project, and a creative collaboration. The scholar will create a narrative summary of the work-in-progress, including dead ends and discoveries: some of this narrative may be incorporated into the book.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites: The student must be a strong writer and with enough imagination and initiative to work independently on research, as well as following directives. An interest in the history and/or literature of the period is useful, but more important is a willingness to learn and engage with the subject.

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship: We’ll begin on 1 December and continue for ten weeks, with a three-week break for Christmas/New Year. We will be finished by the end of February.

Following the success of our book Shining Land: Looking for Robin Hyde, photographer Haru Sameshima and I are planning a follow-up, to be published by Massey University Press in 2023. It’s a multimedia project based around the letters sent by iconic NZ writer Robin Hyde (Iris Wilkinson) in 1938-39, the last two years of her short life: she travelled to China, reporting from the front line of the war with Japan, and then to England. We have the blessing of Hyde’s son, the late Derek Challis, and his widow Lyn, who has given us access to letters and other materials. The book will include archival photography and ephemera, as well as biographical information on the people with whom Hyde corresponded. It will require research at various libraries, including the Alexander Turnbull Library in Wellington. We will be assisted in locating Chinese archival photography by Zhai Shilei, an Associate Professor from China University of Mining and Technology (Jiangsu Province), who has an interest in Hyde’s China experience and writing, and is from Xuzhou, where Hyde spent six weeks in 1938, witnessing its fall to the Japanese. Scholar’s Work: The scholar will assist with online searches of library holdings in New Zealand and the UK for relevant material, written and visual; and with biographical research into the correspondents, who range from family members to famous writers. The scholar could also assist with historical research into the places Hyde spent time (Shanghai, Hong Kong, Xuzhou). We will meet regularly with Haru Sareshima to discuss the visual material he is collecting, as this is an artistic as well as scholarly project, and a creative collaboration. The scholar will create a narrative summary of the work-in-progress, including dead ends and discoveries: some of this narrative may be incorporated into the book.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites: The student must be a strong writer and with enough imagination and initiative to work independently on research, as well as following directives. An interest in the history and/or literature of the period is useful, but more important is a willingness to learn and engage with the subject.

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship: We’ll begin on 1 December and continue for ten weeks, with a three-week break for Christmas/New Year. We will be finished by the end of February.

Benefits to Scholar: Mentorship is at the heart of this summer scholarship. Together we will explore the life and experiences of a writer through piecing together and interpreting documentary material. I enjoy working with the scholar to develop their skills as researchers and writers, and include them in meetings (and events, where possible) so they see the bigger picture of the project. This helps prepare them for PG study in practical as well as imaginative ways. Expectations: Based on past experience, my expectations are of a bright, engaged scholar who is ready to learn, and ready to work. I expect the scholar to be engaged, good-humoured, diligent and reliable. Mentorship is at the heart of this summer scholarship. Together we will explore the life and experiences of a writer through piecing together and interpreting documentary material. I enjoy working with the scholar to develop their skills as researchers and writers, and include them in meetings (and events, where possible) so they see the bigger picture of the project. This helps prepare them for PG study in practical as well as imaginative ways.

Expectations: Based on past experience, my expectations are of a bright, engaged scholar who is ready to learn, and ready to work. I expect the scholar to be engaged, good-humoured, diligent and reliable.

Digital Resources for Writers

Supervisor

Professor Helen Sword

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART020

Project

Over the past 15 years, I have developed innovative digital resources to complement most of my major research and creative outputs. The websites associated with these resources are time-intensive to create and maintain, and several of them are now in dire need of updating (particularly my hypermedia poetry site, which contains dozens of Flash files that need to be converted to HTML5.) At the same time, I am continually developing new resources to extend my research outreach; in particular, my current book project (Writing with Pleasure) will be published in late 2022 by Princeton University Press with supplemental digital materials that I have only just begun to conceptualise. I seek a flexible, adventurous, details-oriented Summer Scholar with an interest in the digital humanities who is willing to take on a wide range of tasks related to these resources, from the mundane to the creative. Websites to be updated/developed: The Stoneflower Path: a hypermedia poetry site; The Writer’s Diet: a diagnostic editing tool; The Writing BASE: a professional development tool for writers; Zombie Nouns: a TedED video that brings to life (and renders humorously undead) an obscure grammatical term; The SPACE Gallery (not yet public): a collection of exercises and prompts for writers who aspire to expand the social, physical, aesthetic, creative, and emotional dimensions of their writing practice.

Scholar’s Work: You will work closely with a leading international expert on academic writing to develop and improve interactive resources for writers from across the disciplines. You will also have an opportunity to observe and participate in the final stages of a complex, multi-year research project leading to the publication of a scholarly book and related online resources. Along the way, you will be prompted to think audaciously, write clearly and face intellectual challenges with confidence and aplomb. (If none of this sounds intriguing or appealing, this is probably not the right project for you!).

Required Skills/Pre-requisites: Experience with Web development and/or graphic design would be an advantage but is not essential.

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship: Dates are negotiable in consultation with the Summer Scholar.

Benefits to Scholar: My previous research assistants have gone on to do postgraduate study at leading universities around the world, including Oxford, Cambridge, British Columbia, Syracuse and Sydney (not to mention Auckland, Vic and AUT). I am a proactive supervisor who is always open to discussing my students’ future study plans and assigning tasks designed to build up their postgraduate research skills.

Expectations: I seek a highly motivated, self-starting Summer Scholar with a meticulous command of written and verbal English, excellent organisational and time-management skills, a thirst for intellectual adventure and a penchant for creative, outside-the-box thinking. Interested students should get in touch with me directly (h.sword@auckland.ac.nz) to arrange a meeting or Zoom call.

Early Modern Book History: A Case Study

Supervisor

Dr Sophie Tomlinson

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART028

Project 

The recent rediscovery of an original copy of Lady Mary Wroth's important prose romance The Countess of Montgomery's Urania in the University of Auckland Library offers an exciting research opportunity for a Summer Scholar. Niece of the courtier and poet Philip Sidney, and writer and translator Mary Sidney, Wroth had a strong literary inheritance. As author of a prose romance in the manner of Sidney's Arcadia, together with a sonnet sequence and pastoral tragicomedy, she is seen as a canonical figure among early modern women writing in English. Publication of the Urania in 1621 sparked a vicious literary controversy that culminated in the book's withdrawal from sale. Twenty-nine copies of the Urania survive in research libraries worldwide, including a copy in the Turnbull Collection of the National Library, Wellington. Auckland's copy was acquired through a private donation. Its importance is increased by the presence of marginal corrections to the text written in ink. Currently there is no published account of this copy, or analysis of the provenance of its scribal corrections. This project will conduct the groundwork for such an account and analysis.

Scholar's Work: Mary Wroth's own copy of the Urania with her textual corrections is available digitally via the University of Pennsylvania library. The Summer Scholar attached to this project will complete the following tasks:

  1. Research Mary Wroth's literary career in the context of Jacobean society and politics to understand the historical significance of the publication of The Countess of Montgomery's Urania;
  2. Conduct a literature review of materials relating to the publication of Wroth's Urania and to handwritten corrections in this work and her poems;
  3. Methodically transcribe and record all the corrections in the Auckland copy of Urania, giving their page and signature number;
  4. Establish to what extent these corrections conform to or differ from Wroth's corrections by comparing the Auckland copy of Urania with Wroth's own copy, viewable online.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites: Knowledge and appreciation of the literature and history of seventeenth-century England; familiarity with online databases such as Early English Books Online (EEBO); a love of book history and interest in the material cultures of writing; ability to work with early printed books; willingness to study elementary paleography (deciphering and interpreting early handwriting).

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship:
4 weeks: 22 November - 17 December 2021;
3 weeks: 10-28 January 2022;
3 weeks: 31 January -18 February 2022.

Benefits to Scholar: Dialogue with student about the expertise acquired in the course of her/his undergraduate study in order to consolidate and extend their interests and strengths. Guide the student in a course of reading covering early modern book production, transmission and reception, with specific focus on early modern women's material texts and the phenomenon of digital editing. Illustrate the subject by exploring printed materials in the University of Auckland and Auckland City Libraries as well as digital databases such as EEBO and Perdita Manuscripts, 1500-1700. Foster a spirit of curious, determined enquiry, and an excitement about big research questions. Talk about and model good academic writing.

Expectations: Commitment, energy and confidence to embark on unfamiliar scholarly territory such as early modern manuscript and print culture; eagerness to learn; voracious reading ability; a love of fine detail; an analytical mind; a sense of humour.

Mapping tangata whenua stories at University of Auckland Waipapa Taumata Rau

Supervisor

Dr Rowan Light

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART032

Project

This project would aim to locate, map and annotate the range of memorials, monuments, art, and other installations around the University of Auckland city campus in ways that relates these sites to the tangata whenua histories of Tāmaki Makaurau. The opportunity here is to bring these diverse stories together so that we can better educate staff and students about the layered past and present of our campus.

The scholar’s role would consist of: Collating a list of sites of significance; Locating current research and identifying expertise around specific sites of significance; Researching in archives for documentary and pictorial sources; Constructing short narratives of sites, alongside possible documentary and/or pictorial sources.

This research would provide the basis for a second digital project through which these sites of significance can be ‘annotated’ through QR Code and linked to an app-based map. Overall, the project fits into my stream of work as project curator at the Auckland Museum building networks of engagement across iwi histories to shape public stories of Aotearoa New Zealand. This project would also complement efforts to craft the University campus’ historical and cultural narrative.

Scholar’s Work: My background in digital humanities, and histories of memory and commemoration in spatial contexts, would provide the conceptual frameworks of the project. The scholar’s work would consist of fieldwork (collating and locating relevant sites), researching in relevant archives and databases, and consulting with expert knowledge-holders of the Auckland campus. On this basis, the scholar would then construct short narratives, perhaps of sites the scholar deems to be of particular significance or interest to them and/or Auckland campus communities. These short narratives would be maximum 500 words each. As supervisor, I will provide close advice on the selection, tone, and clarity of expression in these narratives, while also consulting with the Ass. Dean Vision Mātauranga.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites: Writing and research skills are necessary for this scholarship, well as a desire to think about histories of representation and space. The scholar will need to set their own goals while working with regular input from the supervisor. The scholar would benefit from a knowledge of Aotearoa New Zealand histories, especially Māori and Ngāti Whatua histories. Some knowledge of archives and databases would also be helpful – though, as supervisor, I can provide direction here. A familiarity with Māori names, places, and common words and phrases – if not language fluency – is essential.

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship: Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. My preference is for the scholar/s to begin in November 2021 and complete by February 2022. I am open to negotiating start and finish dates.

Benefits to Scholar: This project is a great opportunity for a scholar to be part of a research project that draws on historical skills focused on developing critical citizenship through public stories. They will develop their knowledge of archives and skills in writing for public audiences. The chance to ‘curate’ a map of sites, with a focus on short narratives or ‘labels’ will make an excellent addition to a CV for someone wanting to pursue public history inside or outside cultural institutions like a university or museum or in community contexts. The research and writing for this project will provide the foundation for an extended digital history project. This would make a compelling project for Honours or Postgraduate research, if the scholar wanted to pursue this.

Expectations: I understand the student will be undergraduate and so will deliver work of that level. I believe that, as per my description above, the project can definitely be handled by a suitable undergraduate student and will create exciting pathways for postgraduate history.

Ways of knowing: Philosophical questions about indigenous knowledge and science

Supervisor

Dr Emily Parke

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART036

Project

The relationship between mātauranga and science has been a topic of significant discussion recently in Aotearoa, within and beyond academia. A related broader discussion is taking place internationally about the relationship between indigenous knowledges and science. The supervisor is a Pākehā philosopher of science whose research spans philosophy and the life sciences. The supervisor is interested in a range of philosophical questions regarding the relationship between indigenous knowledge and science—but the aim of this project is not to assist the supervisor with a particular research agenda. Rather, it is to give the scholar an opportunity to develop and explore their own interests in this area, with guidance from the supervisor and other mentors as appropriate. Questions to explore could potentially include, but are not limited to: What issues arise when people try to judge one way of knowing about the world on another’s terms? The word ‘knowledge’ refers to a range of different ideas, within philosophy and beyond philosophy—how might ambiguities in what is meant by ‘knowledge’ complicate our discussions about different ways of knowing about the world? Some discussions of indigenous knowledge and science talk about science as if it were a clearly demarcated and unified endeavour—is it really?

Scholar’s Work: The scholar and the supervisor will work together in the initial phase to determine the specific aims and trajectory of the project, driven by the scholar’s experience and/or interests pertaining to the relationship between indigenous knowledges and science. The scholar’s work will focus on reading literature from philosophy and other areas, producing annotated bibliographies, and identifying, summarizing and synthesizing key ideas and themes therein. The supervisor will provide initial reading lists; the scholar will identify and review further resources by searching online databases of published literature. While published academic literature is the starting point for this project, the project may also benefit from engaging with voices which are not readily available in published literature, so might also draw on archival or other sources as we go along.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites: The scholar should demonstrate the potential to

  1. conduct independent research using academic databases and other internet resources
  2. efficiently read philosophical and interdisciplinary journal articles and book chapters, and
  3. provide clearly written short summaries of them. It would be great for the scholar to have a major, minor or other coursework in Philosophy. Coursework or other background in Philosophy of Science (or of a particular science, such as Philosophy of Biology), or in any scientific field(s), would also be valuable background.

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship: 10 weeks from 1st December, as a default - but there’s flexibility around exact timing within the summer scholarship period.

Benefits to Scholar: The scholar will gain experience in self-directed exploration of their own interests in a topic area, with guidance from the supervisor and other mentors as appropriate given the project details. A key focus of the project will be on reading written works, writing concise summaries of them, discussing these with the supervisor(s), and deciding together where to go next. The project will thus give the scholar opportunities to develop and hone independent research skills, including searching academic literature and other resources, focused reading, summarising, synthesising ideas, and written and oral presentation skills. This will provide first-hand insight into, and involvement in, the research process in academic philosophy and transdisciplinary work—a significant asset for anyone considering applying for postgraduate programmes, in philosophy or other fields.

Expectations: I expect the scholar to be conscientious, organized, and to approach the topic with curiosity and an open mind.