Humanities

Short Histories from Te Ao Hurihuri

Supervisor

Associate Professor Aroha Harris

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART002

Project

This project, which is already underway, extends the scholarship contained in Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History (2014), the comprehensive Māori history co-authored with Professor Emeritus Atholl Anderson and the late Dame Judith Binney. It draws individual stories out from Tangata Whenua to create short histories focused on selected people, events, groups, ideas and themes. The short histories completed so far are digitally published in Bridget Williams Books (BWB) History Collection, available at public, tertiary, and school libraries throughout the country. Secondary school students and teachers are a key audience, and a selection of these stories has also been picked up by Radio New Zealand. We are now moving into a phase that will focus on the part of the book for which I had primary responsibility: Te Ao Hurihuri and for which I am now taking a leading role. The summer scholar/s will directly contribute research, thinking, and writing to this new series of short histories.

Scholar's Work

Taking a lead from myself as supervisor, and the key historical themes and ideas in Tangata Whenua, the scholar will co-produce a set of five to eight short Māori twentieth-century histories. The scope for the proposed histories is wide, ranging across themes such as sports, music, church, literature and the arts, politics, Treaty of Waitangi claims and settlements, environmental issues, youth culture and many more. The scholar will be invited to negotiate which stories they would like to work on, whether across a range or within a specific theme or period. They will scope, research, draft, and propose images for each short history. I will guide them in all aspects of the work particularly in framing each short history (which will have a word limit of 1000 words), sources, tone and language.

Required Skills/ Pre-requisites

Excellent writing and analysis skills are required for this scholarship, with a particular focus on historical analysis and methods. Applicants ought to be able to work independently and set their own goals, as demonstrated by the successful completion of research skills in their academic studies. Familiarity with Māori history and a general knowledge of New Zealand history, including key texts, would be ideal. An appreciation of the main repositories of New Zealand’s archives and manuscripts will be useful, although applicants need not have first-hand experience of accessing those sources. Applicants who have no Māori language skills will nonetheless need to be familiar with Māori names, places, key events, and common words and phrases.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. My preference is for the scholar/s to begin on 23 November 2020 and complete on 12 February 2021. However, I am also willing to be flexible and discuss any variations the scholar/s might like to propose.

Benefits

The scholar will gain practical Māori historical research skills in an individually supervised environment. They will be introduced to historical research of the kind expected of post-graduate students in history. They will learn to work independently and to sustain a research project over time, as well as enjoying opportunities to develop a team dynamic with others at work on similar related projects. A key practical outcome for any short history published as part of BWB’s Tangata Whenua stories is that the scholar will be able to add a publication to their curriculum vitae.

Outcomes

The scholar will contribute to an ongoing multi-year project that I am co-leading with BWB. Under the banner of Tangata Whenua we are producing short histories suitable for the Aotearoa New Zealand history curriculum in schools, and the summer scholar will make direct contributions to the Te Ao Hurihuri component of the broader project.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

I have successfully supervised three summer scholars over the past ten years, as detailed below. I was sole supervisor of Ryan Bodman in 2010-11. That same year I co-supervised Caitlin Cunningham with Associate Professor Jennifer Frost. In 2016-17 I again co-supervised a summer scholar, Michelle Thorp, with Associate Professor Frost. 2016-17 – Michelle Thorp, Race Relations Meets Social Science in Aotearoa New Zealand and the United States: The Hunn and Moynihan Reports in the 1960s; 2010-11 – Caitlin Cunningham, Racial Histories: New Zealand and the United States; 2010-11 – Ryan Bodman, 20th Century Māori Pop Music.

Philosophy of Science and Covid-19

Supervisor

Dr Emily Parke

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART009

Project

Covid-19 has affected, and will continue to affect, countless aspects of our lives. This project will explore how philosophy of science can contribute to our understanding and ongoing management of the global pandemic and its effects. The supervisor is a philosopher of science focusing on research at the interface of philosophy and biology. While grounded in philosophy, this project will cross disciplinary boundaries to engage with topics including conceptual issues in microbiology, scientific modelling, the rapidly evolving scientific research on Covid-19, and local and global responses to it. Key questions include: How do we need to rethink classic debates in philosophy of science and philosophy of biology in light of Covid-19? How, in turn, can philosophers of science productively contribute to broader discussions of, and responses to, the pandemic? What lessons can we draw about a new ‘philosophy of Covid-19’ from the extensive literature on the philosophy of climate science and climate change, where similar (but also importantly different) issues arise?

Scholar’s Work

The scholar’s work will focus on two main threads.

  1. The first will examine some classic and contemporary debates in philosophy of science and philosophy of biology through the lens of the Covid-19 pandemic. Topics may include the philosophy of microbiology, philosophy of medicine and epidemiology, public understanding and communication of science, and the intersection of science and values. The scholar will review philosophical and interdisciplinary literature on these topics and produce annotated bibliographies. The supervisor will provide initial reading lists; the scholar will identify and review further resources by searching online databases of published academic literature, and by scanning preprint archives and social media for relevant unpublished work (for example, in preprints, blog posts and other online discussions).
  2. The second thread will explore new ways for philosophers of science to contribute to the ongoing discussion of Covid-19 and its implications. This is a rapidly evolving discussion, so the nature of this project will surely evolve between the time of writing this proposal and the start of the scholarship. The scholar will contribute to the supervisor’s research on this topic, including conceptual issues in the scientific study of viruses, scientific modelling and how to represent its findings to the public.

 Tasks will include further focused reviews of contemporary literature; identifying and summarizing key ideas and themes in written works and online discussions; and assisting with various aspects of manuscript preparation.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The scholar should demonstrate the potential to

  1. conduct independent research using academic databases and other internet resources,
  2. efficiently read philosophical and interdisciplinary journal articles and book chapters, and 
  3. provide clearly written short summaries of them.The scholar should have ideally a major, or otherwise a minor or substantial coursework, in philosophy. Background in philosophy of science and/or philosophy of biology would be an advantage. Some coursework or background in biology, medical science or another science would also be an advantage, but is not required. 

Timing/Weeks

The scholar and supervisor will be co-located and based in Auckland. Weeks 2–12 (30 Nov – 19 Feb).

Benefits

The scholar will gain useful experience in research at the interface of philosophy and science, and engaging with highly relevant contemporary issues. A key focus of the project will be on reading written works, writing concise summaries of them, discussing these with the supervisor, and deciding together where to go next. The project will thus give the scholar opportunities to develop and hone independent research skills, including searching academic literature and popular science media, focused reading, summarising, synthesising ideas, and especially written and oral presentation skills. This will provide first-hand insight into the research process in philosophy and interdisciplinary research—a significant asset for anyone considering applying for postgraduate programmes, in philosophy or other fields.

Outcomes

I currently have a Rutherford Fellowship application under review (“A transdisciplinary approach to clarifying our relationship with the living world”), part of which focuses on this topic. If that programme is funded, the summer scholar’s research will contribute substantially to preparing several of its outputs, which include a series of journal articles and a monograph. If my Rutherford project is not funded this year, the focus will be slightly different: The scholar’s research will assist me in compiling drafts of two foundational articles on philosophy of virology and philosophy of science issues pertaining to Covid-19, and other background research for preparing an improved Rutherford and/or Marsden proposal to submit in 2021.I will also be teaching a new postgraduate course in S2 2021 on Philosophy of Science and Covid-19, so however the Rutherford application and related outputs go, this summer scholarship will be instrumental in helping me prepare for that course.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Sam Woolley, 2016–2017; Connor Browne, 2018–2019.

The Land Connects Us

Supervisor

Greg Minissale

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART011

Project

In a pilot study published this year I led of team which established that viewing natural landscape paintings helped viewers to recover from stress faster than those who only viewed scrambled images. We used saliva tests to measure stress levels (cortisol), which peaked after we asked them to perform a stress test (an interview before a panel). Eye tracking technology was used to register interest and engagement through pupil dilation size. The aim of this Summer Scholarship project is to prepare research for a Marsden application in 2021. Unlike the pilot, the Marsden application will propose a project that investigates how paintings depicting the land and sea impact on physical and mental wellbeing by drawing together multicultural perspectives on natural settings.

The project involves selecting 25 digital images of paintings, along with the literature associated with these. These images will be examples from Māori and Pākehā painting, as well as Australian artworks, Chinese watercolour paintings, Pacific contemporary and traditional artworks, and examples of Indian miniature landscape art. Each participant will view all 25 images. Paintings have been chosen, rather than any other kinds of art, as a control measure to limit variables. For the Marsden project, which will involve many more participants, these images will be projected onto screens to individuals drawn from these various Auckland communities while monitoring their eye behaviour with eye tracking technology, and again testing for stress. This combination of images offers the opportunity for individuals to experience relaxation and empathy for traditions different from those they are normally familiar with. We anticipate that there are tangible physical health benefits to be derived by reaching across cultures to share aesthetic emotion, as well as enhancing social cohesion through a deeper understanding of different cultures.

Participants will also benefit from learning Māori familial and spiritual connections to whenua through whakapapa, foregrounding kaitiakitanga via the voiceover that introduces each segment.

Scholar’s Work

The Summer Scholar would help me to prepare for a Marsden application in 2021 by researching associated literature on the images and writing a short report on each image. This would form the basis of the voiceovers that attune each viewer to the images. Required

Skills/Pre-requisites

A scholar with experience of conducting research and producing reports and literature reviews. Some art and art history background would be ideally suited, and those with knowledge of and a sensitivity to the at least one or two cultural components of the project. A strong interest in cultural diversity would also be very helpful.

Timing/Weeks

Both the supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. 2 weeks in December, 3 weeks in January, 4 in February and 1 week in March.

Benefits

This research will provide an excellent opportunity for the scholar to learn about different painting traditions. They would also participate in original research drawing together picture research and culturally specific art historical theories, expanding the scholar’s knowledge base.

Outcomes

This literature and picture research will serve two purposes: to mount a strong and well-justified Marsden application, and as preliminary material for a new book manuscript on multi-cultural approaches to art depicting land and sea.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

One Summer Scholar in 2018 on Visual Complexity in art which has formed the basis of a book chapter in my latest book, Rhythm in Art (Cambridge University Press, 2020).

The SPACE of Writing

Supervisor

Professor Helen Sword

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART013

Project

I am currently working on a book called Writing with Pleasure, which is under contract with Princeton University Press for completion in mid-2021. As part of my research for the book, I invited several hundred academic writers from across the disciplines and around the world to undertake a workshop activity called “The SPACE of Writing,” for which they used coloured pencils and highlighters – unfamiliar writing tools for scholarly researchers accustomed to typing black-and-white text onto a computer screen! – to map the social, physical, aesthetic, creative/cognitive and emotional dimensions of their own writing practice (hence the acronym SPACE). The richly varied diagrams, drawings and mind-maps produced through this exercise defy simple categorisation, suggesting a wealth of visual/verbal insights that fall outside the scope of my book project and indeed beyond the parameters of conventional print formats. Therefore, as an addendum to the book, I plan to showcase the SPACE diagrams in an online gallery and to seek an appropriate scholarly outlet (e.g. a digital journal specialising in hypermedia content) in which to publish a detailed analysis of their content and implications for future research.

Scholar’s Work

Working under my guidance, the Summer Scholar will develop a plan for analysing, interpreting and categorising this treasure trove of visual/verbal materials and for exhibiting the SPACE diagrams in an online gallery. The scholar will also assist with authorial and editorial tasks such as writing descriptive blurbs, proofreading content and preparing a literature review.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

I seek a highly motivated, self-starting Summer Scholar with a meticulous command of written and verbal English, a thirst for intellectual adventure and a penchant for creative, outside-the-box thinking. Experience with Web development and/or graphic design is not essential but would be an advantage.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. Dates are negotiable in consultation with the Summer Scholar.

Benefits

You will work closely with a leading international expert on academic writing to develop a unique creative resource for writers from across the disciplines. You will also have the opportunity to observe and participate in the final stages of a complex, multi-year research project leading to the publication of a scholarly book. Along the way, you will be prompted to think audaciously, write clearly and face intellectual challenges with confidence and aplomb. (If none of this sounds intriguing or appealing, this is probably not the right project for you!)

Outcomes

The Summer Scholar will assist me in the final stages of my book project and will help me produce supplemental scholarly materials based on the book research. Outputs will include an online multimedia gallery and at least one academic article.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

I have supervised several previous summer scholars in the Faculty of Education & Social Work. This is my first application for a Summer Research Scholar in the Faculty of Arts.

“Mother of the ERA”: A Political Biography of Martha W. Griffiths

Supervisor

Associate Professor Jennifer Frost

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART016

Project 

This project is the first biographical study in nearly 40 years of the political career of Representative Martha W. Griffiths(1912-2003).Griffiths, a lawyer, judge, and Democrat, represented a Michigan district in the House of Representatives that included Detroit beginning in 1955. She thus forged a relationship with the US labor movement, particularly the United Auto Workers. She also was a feminist and a member of the National Woman’s Party during the so-called “doldrums” of the modern women’s movement. Over her career, she contributed to reform in many areas. But most consistently she focused on eradicating gender inequalities from legislation over the 1960s and 1970s.“All I want to be is human and American and have all the same rights and I will shut up.” As it turned out, her efforts benefited men as well as women and families. She succeeded in getting “sex” included in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which then prohibited discrimination in employment based on sex alongside race, color, religion, and national origin. She also fought for the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), guiding its passage through Congress in 1973, although the amendment failed to be ratified by the requisite number of states.

Scholar’s Work

The Summer Scholar will carry out historical primary research with two different types of sources. First, to examine the key events in the political career of Representative Martha Griffiths and the political and public reception and impact, the Scholar will conduct research in the US historical newspaper databases available through our library. I will provide the Scholar with a list of topics to look for, but I will encourage the student also to think broadly and follow the leads that emerge in the research process. Second, the Scholar will gather US government documents, particularly from the Congressional Record, in which Griffiths features as either chair or speaker. With both types of primary sources, the Scholar will download or photocopy, annotate, and index the relevant articles.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

This project would best suit a Scholar who has studied history and is familiar with basic historical research, methods, and analysis, has solid writing skills, and has demonstrated the characteristics of initiative, goal-setting, and time management in their own tertiary studies

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. All weeks are possible from 23 November 2020 to 19 February 2021, apart from the Christmas-New Year holiday, as I am here in Auckland all summer. I can work out suitable dates with my Summer Scholar, if successful, to complete the research.

Benefits

The academic and intellectual benefits for a Summer Scholar will involve exposure to primary source material in 20th century United States history, the politics and social movements of the 1950s-1970s USA, and US legal and constitutional history. For a student thinking of undertaking postgraduate research in history, gender studies, politics, or law, the scholarship would provide an advantageous point of departure. The Scholar will also develop more advanced primary research skills as a result of the Scholarship. Specifically, the Scholar will learn or refine their skills at judging and selecting relevant source material and summarising its historical content and significance.

Outcomes

This project is a new one for me, but it builds on my earlier work in US political history and biography. The tasks listed above are tasks I would be doing myself this summer, whereas the contributions of a Summer Scholar will speed my research progress and allow me to spend more time writing this summer.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

I have benefited greatly from my eight previous Summer Scholarships. My 2014, 2017, and 2018 scholars advanced progress on my current book project, “Let Us Vote”: Youth Voting Rights and the 26th Amendment, forthcoming from NYU Press in 2021. I shared a summer scholar on two comparative projects: one with Dr. Nicole Perry in 2019-2020 in German and American studies, and another with A/P Aroha Harris in 2016-2017 in NZ and US history. These projects yielded two conference presentations, thus far. My 2012 and 2011 awards allowed me to research, write, and publish two articles in very new research fields for me. “Cinematic Diplomacy: International Film Festivals and Cold War America” is forthcoming in 2020 in the Journal of Cold War History, and “Popular Culture during the ‘Jazz Age’ and After” appeared as a book chapter in Katherine A.S. Sibley, ed., A Companion to Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover (Malden, Mass.: John Wiley & Sons, 2014), pp. 338-357. My 2010 award contributed to my recent book, Producer of Controversy: Stanley Kramer, Hollywood Liberalism, and Cold War America (2017). Taken together, I cannot imagine maintaining my research output and impact at this level without my wonderful Summer Scholars!

Form and Function: The Importance of Military Formations in Depictions of the Roman Army in Film

Supervisor

Assoc. Prof. Jeremy Armstrong

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART018

Project

In almost every depiction of the Roman army engaging in military action, in both film and television, there is a strong emphasis on battlefield formations – from the legions of Crassus famously marching in the quincunx formation in Spartacus (1960), to the legions of Marcus Aurelius marching towards the Germans in neat lines in Gladiator (2000), to the opening scene from HBO’s Rome (2005). However, as is almost always the case with Hollywood recreations of classical antiquity, this focus on Roman military, in particular infantry, formations is not in line with scholarship on the topic. This project, which will be published as part of a larger collection on ancient warfare in cinema, will explore depictions of Roman battle formations in Hollywood films from two different periods, the ‘Golden Age’ and the ‘Post-Millennial’ eras, and identify the possible origins/inspiration for each of the case studies (in terms of ancient evidence, early modern militaries, popular culture, and cinema itself), and assess their relationship to, and increasing tension with, current historical models.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will develop a database of Roman military formations depicted in film and TV from the past 70 years. Once key examples have been identified, the scholar will also compile a preliminary bibliography on the selected films.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Demonstrated research ability in Classics & Ancient History; preference for some background in reception studies and/or military history (although not required)

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. 23-27 Nov, 30 Nov-4 Dec, 7-11 Dec, 14-19 Dec, 5-8 Jan (short week New Year), 11-15 Jan, 18-22 Jan, 25- 29 Jan, 2 -5 Feb

Benefits

Scholar will engage in ongoing research on the reception of the ancient world in film, highlighting the deep resonances and strong connections which the ancient world still has in modern public opinion and perception.

Outcomes

The proposed work will help in the production of an invited chapter on the Roman army in film for the volume ‘Celluloid Battles: Brill’s Companion to Ancient Warfare on Film’ edited by Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Emma McCall (2015-2016)

Please confirm that you are able to be co-located and based in Auckland with your scholar during the proposed weeks of the summer research project Yes

Researching the University of Auckland Art Collection

Supervisor

Linda Tyler

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART020

Project

Since 1966, the University of Auckland has built and maintained an art collection which reflects significant developments in New Zealand art from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. This is a project designed to document that collection in a book to be published by Auckland University Press that will organised thematically dealing with the different aspects of the collection including Cubism, expressionism and the expatriates; Māori motifs and modernism; Figurative, Colour Field and Gestural Abstraction; Māori and Pasifika artists; New generation diasporic artists; Women artists and feminism; Contemporary photography; Postmodernist appropriations; New methods and media.

Scholar’s Work

The aim of this project is to help the project supervisor produce a book on the University of Auckland Art Collection by collating image permissions and other documentation. The Summer Scholar will research and assemble already published material on the art collection, and structure it into six sections to correlate with the 13 chapters which feature 125 works (a tenth of the collection) and develop an index for the text. The scholar will also produce a guide using the works which links the University Art Collection with Level 3 Achievement Standards in secondary schools to enable it to become a teaching resource.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Attention to detail, ability to work independently from resources, good communication skills and a strong background in art history.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. 23-27 Nov; 30 Nov-4 Dec; 7-11 Dec; 14-19 Dec; 5-8 Jan (short week New Year); 11-15 Jan; 18-22 Jan; 25- 29 Jan; 2 -5 Feb (short week, Auckland Anniversary day)

Benefits

Learn about the requirements of preparing a text for publication, indexing and other roles as well as the requirements for image permissions under New Zealand copyright law.

Outcomes

This will assist with the preparation of a manuscript for submission to Auckland University Press by 1 March 2020.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Amalia Wickstead.

Conceptualising Power

Supervisor

Associate Professor Matheson Russell

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART022

Project

What is power? How should we understand concepts such as domination, subordination and oppression? What are power structures and why do they matter? When are relations of power legitimate and illegitimate? Are such concepts relevant to a theory of justice? How is the concept of power related to the concepts of freedom and capability? How can illegitimate power be resisted in order to achieve a more just society? What role should be played by democratic politics, activism and social critique? These questions fall at the intersections of philosophy, social theory, and political theory. In recent lecture courses, I have sketched a response to these and other related questions. This research project aims to review and expand the lecture material with the intention of turning it into a book.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar’s work will involve two main tasks. Taking my lecture notes and recordings and converting them into working documents for the book project. In the process, the scholar will contribute to the research itself by asking questions and raising issues that might be further addressed in the book. The second task will be to undertake a literature review of the field and to report on books and articles in the literature. Overall, the invitation is for the scholar to be a collaborator and interlocutor in a crucial stage of the development of this research project.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Achieving a B+ or higher in Phil 225/345, ‘Power, Critique and Emancipation’, or similar course. Excellent skills in critical thinking and philosophical reasoning. Excellent attention to detail. Competence in bibliographic searching and the use of research tools such as Google Scholar, PhilPapers, Philosopher’s Index. Ability to organise workflow and work to deadlines. An educational background in gender studies, sociology, and/or politics would be an advantage.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. Tentatively, the weeks of the project are as follows, but I am flexible and open to negotiating different timings:23-27 Nov 2020; 30 Nov-4 Dec;7-11 Dec; 14-19 Dec; 5-8 Jan (short week New Year);11-15 Jan; 18-22 Jan; 25- 29 Jan; 2 -5 Feb (short week, Auckland Anniversary day); 9-12 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 8 Feb); 15-19 Feb

Benefits

The Summer Scholar will develop research skills that will be useful for postgraduate study in any discipline, especially in the Humanities. They will improve their philosophical thinking and writing skills.They will extend their knowledge of recent debates in political philosophy and critical theory.

Outcomes

The expectation is that a full working document will be produced by the end of the summer: not a book manuscript as such, but a set of draft notes capturing and organising all of the claims, arguments and illustrations that will make up the content of the book project. Over the subsequent 12 months, this working document will be further revised and developed before it is used as the basis for a book manuscript.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Nicole Wallace (2008-2009); Andrew Mathieson (2017-2018); Susannah Colbatz (2018-2019).

Ancient Rome in contemporary feminist and queer fantasy novels

Supervisor

Dr Maxine Lewis

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART024

Project

In the last decade, a growing number of Classicists have studied the way that fantasy and science fiction engage with the Greek and Roman past (examples include the four volumes edited by Brett M. Rogers and Benjamin Eldon Steven for OUP between 2015 and 2019). My particular interest lies in the way that some very recent works engage explicitly with gender politics in the service of feminist and/or LGBTQ agendas (Naomi Alderman’s The Power, Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games trilogy and Jay Kristoff’s The Nevernight Chronicles), while others deploy tropes of Rome to reinforce traditional mores (e.g Cold Magic, by Kate Elliott). This remains an understudied area within Classical Reception Studies. This summer scholarship will conduct a survey of contemporary fantasy novels that use material from the ancient Roman world (whether explicitly or implicitly). Novels that engage with gender politics will be identified, and deeper bibliographic searches and analysis will be conducted on them. The project will identify research that can be used by the supervisor in an article or possibly series of articles. It will also identify primary sources that could be the subject of the scholar’s future Honours dissertation or MA thesis.

Scholar’s Work

  • Stage 1. The scholar will conduct bibliographic searches to identify modern fantasy novels in English that use or engage with material from ancient Roman history, culture and literature. The scholar will then survey the novels, identifying which ones warrant attention specifically for their portrait of or engagement with themes of gender. This can include: depictions of homoeroticism, genderqueer identities, feminist or anti-feminist characters or stances, or the author’s own gender being drawn into commentary about their work. The scholar will then compile bibliography on those novels, including academic and mainstream print sources, as well as interviews and paratextual material by the authors. The scholar will keep track of all references and produce notes on them using reference management software.
  • Stage 2. The scholar will then select two-three of the wider group of novels under investigation, chosen according to their own research interests. The supervisor will help the scholar to identify the key ancient Roman sources and/or tropes used in those novels, and will provide guidance on theories and methods frequently used in Classical Reception Studies. The scholar’s final task will be to write a close textual analysis of how their chosen novels engage with the ancient sources, applying insights from Classical Recaption Studies. 

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The student must be a fast reader in English, able to quickly read contemporary novels. In terms of knowledge of content, the student would benefit from being well-versed in: Roman history and/or culture; Contemporary English literature, especially fantasy and/or science fiction, and; The analysis of feminist and/or queer literature.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. Weeks 1-4 (23rd of November to 19th of December) and 7-12 (11th of January to 19th of February)

Benefits

The scholar will learn to: Conduct wide-ranging bibliographic sources across multiple fields; Use reference management software; Identify references to and adaptations of Roman sources in modern creative works; Research and produce a piece of written work at the intersection of two disciplines. The project will prepare the scholar to undertake independent, higher-level research in the sub-field of Classical Reception Studies, which could be completed either in Classics and Ancient History, or in English. The scholar will thus finish the project with a skillset that can take them further in multiple programmes. I envisage the project being of the most benefit to a student at the end of their undergraduate degree, making the transition into Honours. However, completing the project could also be of particular benefit to a student who had already completed Honours, but needed to upskill further in Classical Reception before pursuing an MA.

Outcomes

I have begun work on an article on Jay Kristoff’s The Nevernight Chronicles, a recent best-selling trilogy. My main interest in the work is in how it situates an explicitly bisexual heroine within a fairly traditional vision of Roman political history. To strengthen my analysis of Kristoff’s innovations I need to situate his work more deeply within the genre of fantasy and the scholarship that examines it. I have conducted a preliminary bibliographic search of both primary and secondary sources. It would be useful to have a scholar comprehensively trawl the sources.It would also be valuable to have someone with whom I could discuss the overall topic with and bounce ideas off. This was a really valuable part of the process with my 2015-2016 summer scholar that helped me refine my ideas for an article that came out of the project (Lewis, Classical Receptions Journal, 2018).

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Thomas Riley, “The Literary Reception of Catullus’ Poetry”, 2015-2016.

Emily Harris in New Zealand and Australia

Supervisor

Professor Michele Leggott

City Campus: Arts 1, Room 603

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART026

Project

I am preparing online editions of important primary material relating to New Zealand writer and artist Emily Cumming Harris (1837-1925). Very little is known about Harris’s early years in Taranaki, about the writing she did during the siege of New Plymouth in 1860 or about her time in Hobart and Melbourne 1861-65. An edition of Harris’s unpublished diaries 1885-86 and 1888-1891, with introduction and contextual notes, will extend what we know about the artist’s struggle to earn a living by means of teaching and painting in the late 19th century as women began to emerge from the rigid expectations of colonial life. The diaries form the basis for an extended investigation into the life and work of a woman who deserves to be better known for her contributions to current debates about creativity, gender and memory. As Emily Harris’s archival profile is restored and primary materials become available for critical and creative research, I am planning a number of mini-projects that will connect 21st century artists and writers with an important predecessor. Each mini-project is archivally based and aims to bring Emily Harris into conversation with contemporary research into our decolonising but forgetful present.

Scholar’s Work

The summer scholar will help research and write contextual notes for the editions of primary material by Emily Harris and prepare clean copy for upload towards the end of the scholarship period. The scholar will work alongside my small research team (Brianna Vincent and Dasha Zapisetskaya) who are helping me develop the larger framework of my Harris project and whose experience to date with the data we have uncovered will give the scholar a head start on their tasks. Over the summer the team will design and develop a creative project that responds to Emily Harris’s hand-coloured lithographs of New Zealand flowers, berries and ferns, combining text and image multiples by means of video production for online presentation. 

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

 The summer scholar who joins my project should be excited about historical research and its impact on contemporary thinking. A knowledge of the role of archives and documentary record is essential, and someone who has completed English 718 Opening the Archive is well suited for the project. Students who have completed other archive research focussed papers across Arts are also welcome to apply.Precise skills: * locating, assessing and description of historical records. * clear, analytical writing and note-taking. * high-level copy editing and proofreading.* ability to work as part of a research team. * experience of creative / critical thinking and its application to research. 

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. The scholar should be available to work agreed on hours each week between 23 November 2020 and 19 February 2021. Christmas / New Year holidays to be agreed on by mutual arrangement. 

Benefits to Scholar

The scholar will join an existing project with clear research and publication goals and will make substantial contributions towards achieving them. The scholar’s existing research and writing skills will be extended by practical application and by working as a member of my research team. The summer scholar will also be given the opportunity to contribute to our regular research news on the website dedicated to the project. The scholar’s contribution to the project will be fully credited in online publications, adding valuable citations to their academic CV. The experience will also extend the scholar’s confidence in their ability to undertake further postgraduate work at MA or PhD level. 

Outcomes 

As outlined above, Emily Harris in New Zealand and Australia is an ambitious project that needs sustained research to discover the work and contexts of a figure who has fallen out of the historical record. Having another pair of hands will hasten our progress to online delivery of data that will attract attention and draw resources as yet unknown to Harris researchers.

For an example of the kind of publication we are projecting, see: ‘The Family Songbook: Harris letters and Memoirs 1840-1853.’ Emily Cumming Harris in New Zealand and Australia. (March 2019) Emily Cumming Harris in New Zealand and Australia.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Brianna Vincent 2018-19 Dasha Zapisetskaya 2019-20  

Decolonising Logic

Supervisor

Patrick Girard
Andrew Withy

Discipline

Cultures, Languages and Linguistics; Humanities

Project code: ART028

Project

This scholarship is preparatory research on a larger project that aims to better understand the western biases in the discipline of logic as it is commonly practiced and taught in the twentieth century. The scholar will first need to get up to speed with the idea of Decolonising Methodologies (Linda Tuhiwai Smith, 2012). The project will proceed by looking at criticism of logic from a feminist and post-modernist tradition. This follows from previous work with a summer scholar leading to a joint publication on the feminist critique of the practice of critical thinking. The scholar will first look at how the feminist critique of critical thinking generalises to the practice of logic in general. We will then look critiques of western logic from different cultures (Indian logic, Chinese logic). Time permitting, we will also look at understandings of logic in communities that are identified as being part of a minority (LGBTQ, indigenous knowledge, etc). The main goal is to establish the first steps in re-contextualising logic and better understand its origin and outreach.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will first need to get up to speed with the idea of Decolonising Methodologies (Linda Tuhiwai Smith, 2012). They will then conduct research online, in the library or in the community (if suitable), will collate information, papers, websites, etc, and will provide verbal and written summary reports on the research.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

No specific skills are required to undertake the research, but familiarity with logic as taught in the Introduction to Logic (PHIL101) course, or equivalent, Course offered by Philosophy would help. An interest in critical theory topics such as decolonisation, gender studies, queer studies, or other areas of oppression would be helpful. A student with the potential to read a lot of information and categorise and summarise it efficiently would be ideal!

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. Summer 2020-2021.

Benefits

This project will provide the scholar with first-hands experience in research on a general topic. The scholar will have to find the appropriate resources for conducting the research, and for reporting the results. The scholar will learn to develop research skills and build autonomy in conducting a research project.

Outcomes

This is the start of a longer project to understand logic and its practice in a modern world, both in research and in teaching.At this stage, it is as much a personal/professional growth that will eventually find a way to advance the supervisors’ research and teaching in making them wiser.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Marcus Triplett, Declan Thompson, Adam Dalgleish, Joy Britten, Conor Leisky.

“As You Like It”: a performance history and resource database

Supervisor

Tom Bishop

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART033

Project

I am editing Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” for the Arden 4 (Bloomsbury) series of editions. In addition to the standard forms of textual editing and critical discussion, my edition will pay careful attention to the history of performance of the play, in English and in other languages, and in particular to the way the script has been remodelled to adapt it for performances in different eras, from the late seventeenth to the twenty-first century.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will compile and annotate, along parameters to be defined, as full a list as possible of key historical performances of the play, indicating – according to the evidence available -- their auspices, leading actors, design and costume features, interpretive strategies, surviving records (promptbooks, photographs, etc), selected reviews and other responses, and so on.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Ability to digest multiple sources of information, including written, visual (paintings, sketches, photographs and video), and digital. Ability to identify and search online databases and other sources. Knowledge of normal features of plays, especially Shakespearean plays. Some sense of theatre history desirable.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. 30 Nov-4 Dec; 7-11 Dec; 14-19 Dec; 5-8 Jan (short week New Year); 11-15 Jan; 18-22 Jan; 25- 29 Jan ; 2 -5 Feb (short week, Auckland Anniversary day); 9-12 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 8 Feb); 15-19 Feb. Start date may change, depending on final leave plans.

Benefits

The Scholar will learn how to use online and library materials in various media to synthesize information from a wide range of sources into a single overview. The Scholar will become familiar with the kinds and qualities of material used in theatre history, and with issues in the recovery and criticism of theatrical performance from past times.

Outcomes

The summer project will generate a detailed resource and database from which the supervisor can build a full account of the performance history of the play and its relation to changing ideas and practice of the text.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

2008-09 Kiri Pihana-Wong and Rebecca O’Leary; 2012-13 Grayson Zhang; 2014-15 Anya Banerjee

Renaissance court culture: An interdisciplinary approach

Supervisor

Associate Professor Erin Griffey

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART036

Project

The early modern court was a political and cultural powerhouse, a site of religious authority and identity and a hotbed of factional rivalry and international diplomacy. The court was a complex matrix of places, spaces, rituals, performances and objects that converged in the person of the monarch and his or her household and radiated out to the satellite courts of consorts and heirs. To understand the power dynamics and cultural significance of the early modern period, the court is the defining institution. This project positions early modern European court culture within its political, confessional, spatial, material and performative contexts. Covering the period from 1500-1750, the approach is both cross-cultural and interdisciplinary, providing insights into aspects of both community and continuity at courts as well as individual identity, change and difference.

Scholar’s Work

This project will result in a major edited handbook for Routledge entitled, Early Modern Court Culture. The scholar would provide valuable research assistance, including providing an annotated bibliography of secondary sources as well as editorial assistance in ensuring the formatting is consistent and proofreading texts.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Applications encouraged from BA students with a major in Art History, English, History or Politics and International Relations. This project requires excellent critical reading and writing skills.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. I am flexible and will be based in Auckland during this time. I can liaise with the scholar about the weeks that suit.

Benefits

This project will enable the Scholar to refine their critical reading and writing skills for postgraduate research. Because there is also an editorial element of the project, the Scholar would gain insight into preparing a manuscript for publication, developing skills in proofreading and formatting to guidelines. It may also help facilitate contacts and research ideas in court studies.

Outcomes

I am the general editor of a large handbook for Routledge’s Early Modern Themes series on Early Modern Court Culture. This comprises 35 essays on different aspects of court culture and will be around 150,000 words in total. The book is under contract, with contributors confirmed and essays due by September 2020. I am already editing the essays as they come in, but this will be a big job over the summer so that it can all be completed by April 2021. The Scholar would be indispensable in ensuring that the manuscript was submitted on time by assisting me with research assistance for the introduction and transitions between chapters as well as editorial back-up in helping to proofread and format texts. Naturally, the student would be acknowledged in the text for their assistance.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Victoria Munn, Elizabeth Newton-Jackson, Susannah Whaley, Katrina Whittleston, Imogen Allan, Emma Jameson, Lucy Yu.

Sources for Ancient Orphism

Supervisor

Dougal Blyth

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART037

Project

In recent years there has been greatly increasing scholarly interest in the ancient Mediterranean religious phenomenon today called Orphism, mainly owing to a variety of significant new archeological textual finds (especially the Derveni papyrus and the inscribed gold leaves found in burials). This has significantly changed our view of the reports of Orphic practices and beliefs that have come down in the Greek literary tradition (particularly in Pindar, Herodotus and Plato; but also more extensively from late neo-Platonists sources, and the so called Orphic Hymns). The first collection of source material was Kern (1922), which, owing to extensive subsequent finds, is now replaced by Bernabé (2005), online. There have been several important books in the last couple of decades, but no chronologically or systematically organised translation of all the evidence with commmentary (although on the gold leaves in particular see e.g. Bernabé and Jiménez, 2008; Graf & Johnston2, 2013; Edmonds, 2013; Jenner, 2016; and on the Derveni papyrus, e.g. Laks and Most, 1997; Betegh 2004; Kouremenos et al., 2006; Piano, 2016). An annotated translation of all the most important literary evidence, perhaps also with translations and notes on the recently found texts, would be a hugely important resource for further research and teaching.

Scholar’s Work

Working from Bernabé (2005) and Kern (1922), along with modern scholarly discussions of the recent finds and commentaries on literary source texts, to produce, first, a spreadsheet (or lists) of relevant source passages from Greek authors (particularly Pindar, Herodotus, Euripides, Plato, and neo-Platonists) organised (or cross-referenced) chronologically and by topic; second, to add for each individual passage a bibliography of citations and scholarly discussions; third, if possible, to begin a draft translation of the passages; and fourth, if possible, to make notes based on the cited discussions, for commentary on each.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Greek language (at least to stage 2 level); familiarity with and an interest in ancient Greek literature and thought; prior experience in use of Greek texts as evidence in essay writing and student research; ability to organise evidence, analyse and categorise; writing skill. Also useful: familiarity with spreadsheets; reading knowledge in any or all of French, Italian, Spanish and German.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. November 23rd 2020 — February 5th 2021.

Benefits

Experience in research on Greek literature, thought and religion, and extension of knowledge of these fields, both in methods of treatment of evidence and relevant scholarship and familiarisation with the state of current research in the field; practice in use of ancient Greek language in reading and translation; possible contribution to a resultant publication; preparation for further graduate student research.

Outcomes

The project on Orphism will contribute to several ongoing research aims at once. First, it is my contention, in part of a current planned book, that evidence purported to be of Pythagoreanism among pre-Roman native Italians in ancient southern Italy is in fact rather evidence of Orphism; the Orphism project will help with solidifying the case for this, and for distinguishing Orphism from Pythagoreanism. Second, I have regularly published on Plato in the past, and I see there is room on the basis of this project for a re-evaluation of the influence of Orphism on Plato. Third, I envisage direct publication of the results of this project as a viable goal in the medium term, as a set of translated source passages with commentary, probably in book form.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

Paul Johnston, Bibliographical database on piety in the ancient world, and assistance organising a two-day Workshop on Piety with international contributors (2012-13). This led to Mr Johston going on to complete BA (Hons.) and MA in Ancient History here, as a result of which he was accepted for a PhD in Classics at Harvard University, for which he is currently writing a dissertation.Jasmine Doris, Database of passages in early Greek literature related to piety and a written survey (2013-14). This led to Ms Doris enrolling for and gaining a BA (Hons.) in Ancient History here; subsequently she completed an MA in Classical Languages at Edinburgh University.

Ngā Taonga o Wharawhara / The World of Māori Body Adornment: Understanding adornment in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Worlds – A Literature Review

Supervisor

Associate-Professor Ngarino Ellis (Ext 86992)

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART038

Project

The broader Ngā Taonga o Wharawhara / The World of Māori Body Adornment project aims to produce research on the history of Māori body adornment to the present day. This field is under-researched, and the project promotes the idea of a continuum of practice of Māori artists in relation to the use of materials, the changing technologies, and the ways in which adornment has been and continues to be integrated into the social, political, economic and cultural landscape of whānau, hapū and iwi.

While previous Summer Scholars have written a literature review on the topic (2017-8) identified important taonga and collectors viz-a-viz the auction world (2018-9), and begun a global database of Māori adornment (2019-20) the current application is for a scholar to write a literature review in two parts: a) Indigenous adornment and b) non-Indigenous adornment. This knowledge will situate the Wharawhara project within a global context, as connections through materials, functions, and significance are identified. Ultimately this project is written by, about and for Māori, and will contribute to a growing corpus of Māori art histories with the research goal of working towards reconnecting taonga with their whanau, hapū and iwi. ** A literature review of this material is not funded under the Royal Society Marsden project, hence this application.

Scholars’ Work

The Scholar will undertake the following research:Conduct a comprehensive search for all publicly-available oral and written historical and contemporary material on Indigenous (non-Māori) and non-Indigenous personal adornment. This will include material in books and articles in particular. Review, analyse and interpret this material to identify, where possible: key themes from the field as a whole, e.g. materials, biographies (of artworks, of artists), use in politics, impact of religion; and critical methodologies in relation to studies in this area, particularly from an Indigenous perspective, where evident; and important artworks and practices which should be highlighted for their korero (life stories); gaps in the current state of the literature that my project will attempt to address; Synthesise these up into a cohesive 5,000-word report.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

  • Research skills: being able to identify important online and in-library sources, organise them into type and tribal affiliation, and maybe date, and synthesise them into an extended report.
  • PDF processing: scanning all relevant documents, particularly images of adornments;
  • Dropbox: where all the scanned documents and final Review will be stored. 
  • Time management skills: they should be a self-starter, and able to work by themselves with the supervisor’s support.
  • Ideally someone with a some knowledge of Art History, History or Anthropology.
  • Ideally the student will also have their own or access to a laptop on which to work for the project.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. The project will stretch over the summer months beginning on 23 November 2020 to being completed by 19 February 2021. I will be co-located in Auckland for the duration of the project except for periods of statutory or annual leave; the latter I will inform the student about.

Benefits

The project is intended as an introduction into graduate study, by providing the Scholar with the opportunity to research and write a literature review which is necessary in all graduate courses, and especially for dissertations and theses. I am particularly keen on encouraging more students to engage with Māori and Indigenous art while here at University, and this project is one way in which a student can do so while being mentored. The Scholar will learn about managing a specific project, thinking through working full-time on a research project, and how to plan their time, daily, weekly and monthly. For noting: a Summer Scholar over 2019-20, Taniora Maxwell, who was based at Nga Pae o Te Maramatanga is now working on his MA for the Wharawhara project full time, funded through the Royal Society Marsden fund.

Outcomes

This research is my primary research focus for the next 3 years. Material from this Summer Scholarship will contribute towards my new project which focuses on Maori adornment. Specifically, this literature review will identify important methodologies, frameworks and materials in which the project can be located in terms of a global network of adornment.The primary outcome of this wider research project will be a major book; provisional discussions with a major NZ-based press have been very positive. I also intend curating an exhibition and have discussed this with Nigel Borell, Curator Māori, Auckland Art Gallery; I would also intend to tour it possibly to Pataka Gallery or the Dowse which both feature exhibitions on Māori and craft. There are conference presentations also planned in order to disseminate my research on adornment and receive immediate feedback.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

2019-20 Ngā Mahi a Wharawhara / Māori Body Adornment: re-connecting global collections of taonga with whanau, hapū and iwi through digitisation. Eleanor Almeida and Eliza MacDonald. The database initiated by the Scholars has been continued through 2020 by a Research Assistant. Their findings will contribute to my new Royal Society Marsden funded project of the same name which will run 2020-22. Eleanor is completing her BA in 2020, while Eliza has moved on to a Masters of Heritage Conservation (Museums & Cultural Heritage) and is currently in my Honours class. 2018-9 Ngā Mahi a Wharawhara / Māori Body Adornment: Identification, Summary and Analysis of Collections in Overseas Museums and in Auction Catalogues. Amber Rhodes The research was used for an application for a Marsden standard application in 2019; this was successful and began in March 2020. Amber is currently enrolled in a Masters of Heritage Conservation (Museums & Cultural Heritage). She enrolled in my Honours papers in 2019 and is a current student of mine in 2020.She is due to write her 45-point dissertation with me in 2021. 2016-7 Maori Personal Adornment. A Literature Review. Eleanor Mathews (Maori). The research by Eleanor was used towards the Royal Society Marsden application in 2019. Other fundings were used for a chapter for a new major book (200,000 words) with Deidre Brown entitled Toi Te Mana: An Indigenous History of Maori Art (AUP, forthcoming 2021). Eleanor has continued on to MA study in Art History in 2018. 2015-6 Hone and Pine Taiapa. Masters Carvers of the 20th Century.

A Literature Review. Justine Treadwell This research contributed towards a journal article in a Special Issue: Indigenous of Biography (University of Hawaii Press). This research contributed towards a journal article in a Special Issue: Indigenous of Biography (University of Hawaii Press). Justine completed her Honours in Art History and in late 2020 enrolled in a PhD in Art History with myself as her primary supervisor. 2013-4 Toi Te Mana. An Extended and Illustrated Timeline of Maori Art to 1800. Jodie Botica (Maori). This research contributed to the book manuscript for Toi Te Mana: An Indigenous History of Maori Art (AUP, forthcoming 2021). 2012-3 Moko Signatures.

A Literature Review. Te Raukura Solomon (Maori). I published an article in Journal of the Polynesian Society in 2014 on this topic.

Engaging with Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland's Past

Supervisor

Prof Linda Bryder
Dr Jess Parr (Jonathan and Mary Mason Summer Scholarship in Auckland History)

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART041

Project

The students will assist to advance the goals of the Auckland History Initiative (AHI), located in History, School of Humanities. The AHI seeks to engage with and capture the historical development, vibrancy and diversity of Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland and its importance to New Zealand life and beyond. Its aim is to reach beyond the University to build strong and enduring connections with Auckland’s many history and heritage institutions and communities, and to put Auckland’s history at the heart of an energetic conversation about our city. In collaboration with stakeholders including iwi, Council, central government agencies, the GLAMR sector (galleries, libraries, archives, museums and records), research institutes and local historical societies, the AHI aims to ask searching questions about Auckland’s past to understand its present and future directions. The project is also collaborating with the New Zealand History Teachers Association, pending the new school curriculum relating to New Zealand history. The AHI is currently seeking funding from the Lottery Heritage Fund to set up an online Dictionary of Auckland History in collaboration with the Auckland War Memorial Museum, and with the support of other local archives, museums and galleries. If successful, the summer scholars will also contribute to this exciting new development.

Scholar’s Work

In order to help build an understanding of Auckland’s past in its multifaceted aspects, including urban, transnational, ethnic, cultural, social and environmental histories, the Scholars will work collaboratively to seek out archival material relevant to the study of Auckland history. Preliminary meetings will be held with various sectors who have already indicated a willingness to participate in this programme and have done so in the past. They include the Auckland City Council Heritage Unit, the Auckland City Library Research Centre, the Museum of Transport and Technology, and the Auckland War Memorial Museum (specifically its new Tamaki Galleries). Each Scholar will select a case study of their own choosing for which there is a set of archival records to draw on. They will spend the ten weeks of the Scholarship exploring these records to develop that case study. The outcome will be a series of short illustrated accounts (usually 3 entries of 1500 words each) that will appear on the AHI website and will be shared with the Auckland City Library Heritage website a talk in the Auckland City Library seminar series and a podcast, and possibly also a talk to the staff members of the institution in which the archives are held.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Some historical training will be a pre-requisite along with basic computer skills. The students will not necessarily have already engaged with primary source material, but will have good analytical and writing skills.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. November to February.

Benefits

The Scholar will learn to navigate electronic catalogues and other history finding aids, which will prove useful grounding for further historical research at graduate level. The student will learn to read and analyse archival and other primary source material and how to use this material to tell a story. The student will also learn about the history of the local community in which he and she is currently based, furthering an interest in his or her surroundings. The student will gain useful contacts in the GLAM sector (two of my former Scholars were subsequently offered contracts by bodies in the heritage sector to conduct further research). Being asked to present the results of their research will also increase their confidence in public speaking and engagement.

Outcomes

The Summer Scholars will significantly contribute to the development of the Auckland History Initiative of which I am currently principal investigator. I am collaborating with colleagues in the Humanities (Art History), and the School of Architecture and Planning, to achieve research outputs, initially on the Initiative’s own website, but also more reflective pieces in conventional historical journals and specialised journals in urban history. We are currently applying for a Lottery Heritage Grant to develop an online history. One of the main benefits will be research-based collaboration with public bodies in the region of Auckland, including the Auckland War Memorial Museum and the Auckland Council Heritage Unit. Given the growing recognition of the importance of impact in the staff research, this collaboration advances the strategic goals of the University in the research domain.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

One of the goals of the scheme is to encourage students into postgraduate study. I am currently supervising the MA thesis of one of my former Summer Scholars on a subject related to his scholarship. I supervised two Honours dissertations last year of former Summer Scholars on Auckland history. I have run summer Scholarships in association with the AHI for two years now, and both batches have been extremely successful in outputs and student experience. Each year I supervised four students – in the first year, two under the University scheme and two funded by philanthropy, and in the second year three funded by the University and one by philanthropy. The AHI has been offered one funded by philanthropy again this year, so I wish to apply for three from the University. I have found that working as a group has been very successful for the Scholars – they share ideas and inspire and incentivise each other. We received very positive feedback from the students; some of their comments are included in an interview on the AHI website, for instance Nathan McLeay ‘found it to be a very useful and enjoyable introduction to the process of independent scholarly research.’ He also ‘appreciated the opportunity it provided to work with Auckland Council, and conduct historical research in a public sector, rather than a solely academic context.’ 

Applicants for this project will also be considered for Jonathan and Mary Mason Summer Scholarship in Auckland History.

Iconoclasm or Vandalism: The defacement and removal of public monuments in the name of political protest

Supervisor

Dr Robin Woodward (Ph 09 9237257)

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART044

Project

Iconoclasm or vandalism? Sir Winston Churchill has been boxed up; Cecil Rhodes is under watch, and Bristol's Edward Coulston was thrown into the harbour. In Boston, Miami and Virginia Christopher Columbus has been attacked, and General Robert E. Lee now requires the protection of the law. In New Zealand, Captain John Hamilton has been trucked off for safekeeping, there is a call for Richard Seddon to be removed, and a woman has been charged with attacking Colonel Nixon in Otahuhu. In the context of Black Lives Matter, these statues have come into sharp focus. Never has public art been such a popular or, more accurately, populist topic. The last time it received international headlines was probably on the fall of Baghdad in 2003 when the media led with an image of a statue of Saddam Hussein being torn down. My area of specialisation is public art in the Western tradition of art history. This project examines the defacement and removal of public monuments in the name of political protest. The focus is on public monuments in Aotearoa New Zealand where this is not a new kaupapa, a new issue. Such statues represent colonisation and have been targeted in the past.

Scholar’s Work

The Summer Scholar will research the history of colonial monuments in New Zealand, from the commissioning of a work to its current situation. Research will include tracking the attention individual works have received and documenting attention paid them. This will then be contextualised through comparisons with colonial monuments internationally. The context will focus on works which are currently in the spotlight. The first task will be to identify monuments relevant to the project and then to undertake research into their history. The provenance of works will be traced from the inception of each project to the attention they are receiving currently. Works will need to be documented and analysed. Reasons behind the commissions or selection of the subjects need to be ascertained, using both primary and secondary sources. From this, details and patterns around theme, form and subject matter should become evident and offer avenues for continuing investigation. Comparisons with similar activity overseas would be the next stage of this project. To what extent is the commissioning and the current focus on public monuments and statuary in Aotearoa New Zealand consistent with international patterns of activity in this field? Or are there distinguishing features around the public attention that local works are receiving at the moment? The Scholar will follow up this line of investigation particularly in relation to statuary. Findings will be written up in draft form in preparation for publication.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The Summer Scholar will need to have a strong knowledge of New Zealand art and preferably a specific background in sculpture and public art. S/he will need strong skills of visual analysis and have the ability to contextualise individual works. As there will be a component of contact with archivists and librarians, the Summer Scholar must have excellent people skills and an ability to work with people from a range of backgrounds. An ability to think laterally will be necessary particularly in the preliminary stages of this research when a data base is being established. Meticulous attention to detail is needed, as is good critical judgement because there is a strong element of critique in this project. As a base line for this project the scholar should have demonstrated the ability to engage with theory. Previous experience of researching and analysing New Zealand sculpture or public art would be beneficial. The Scholar will have strong academic research and writing skills.

Timing/Weeks

Both supervisor and scholar will be co-located and based in Auckland. 23-27 Nov; 30 Nov-4 Dec; 7-11 Dec;14-19 Dec;5-8 Jan (short week New Year); 11-15 Jan; 8-22 Jan; 25- 29 Jan; 2 -5 Feb (short week, Auckland Anniversary day); 9-12 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 8 Feb); 15-19 Feb.

Benefits

This topic has direct relevance to most of the Art History 7T papers and could also open the door to dissertation and MA thesis topics. As I will be Graduate Advisor in Art History I will be ideally placed to mentor a transition into graduate study or to further graduate study This project will develop the student’s skills in the area of primary research. It will also expose the Summer Scholar to the range of avenues that can be accessed in tracking down and identifying resources and artworks. The professional skills around documenting artworks will be learnt, as will the skills round managing information, sourcing relevant theory, applying it and critiquing responses to art. Development of writing skills will be a result of working on this project, as will an increase in knowledge of New Zealand sculpture in particular, the country’s visual arts in general, and an international context.

Outcomes

Currently I have a number of contacts who are willing to publish the results of my research. Having assistance with the basic fact finding and assessment of information frees up my time for analysis, comparative study and writing, thus moving projects to completion at a faster rate. Over the past few years I have had increased success in having my work accepted for international conferences and in publications. Given the success of the strategy I employed with my recent Summer Scholar projects, for this current application I have crafted a discrete project with targeted outcomes. This is a well-defined project and I have a specific publication in mind for this content, the principal international publication for research on public art, Public Art Dialogue. I have been in contact with the current editor who indicated I should submit an essay on this research, given the importance and topicality of it.

Supervisor’s Previous Summer Scholars

2010/11 Summer Scholar Sandra Cammell (MA 1st Class Honours, PGDipTchg): Outcomes: Woodward, R. L. (2011).Current. Auckland, Whitespace and London October Gallery. (10 pages catalogue:e and essay to accompany exhibition in Auckland and London).Woodward, R. L. (2012). Survival within Nature. World Sculpture News, 18, 32-36. Woodward, R. L. (2013). Nic Moon Recent Work. Auckland, Whitespace. ISBN 978 0 473 23888 9(2900 word essay) Woodward, R. L. (2018).’If this land could speak: human ecology and the art of Nic Moon’ Journal of New Zeala. nd & Pacific Studies, 6:1, 55-66. Woodward, R. L. (2018). ‘Place, People, Public: The Art of Nic Moon’ Backstory, AUT, 4, 18-37 . 2013/2014 Summer Scholar Brita Rollinson (MA 1st Class Honours, PGDipTchg) Outcomes: Woodward, R. L. (2014). ‘Katherine Mansfield: Woman of Words’ in Katherine Mansfield and World War I. Edinburgh University Press, 160-167. Invitation to speak at the AGM of the Wellington Sculpture Trust. July 2014. Consultative and advisory role for exhibition of portraits of Katherine Mansfield for the New Zealand Portrait Gallery, Wellington. Katherine Mansfield: A Portrait 2 August – 22 October 2018 . Woodward, R. L. ‘A Unique Perspective: Terry Stringer’s Portraits of Katherine Mansfield’ accepted for Katherine Mansfield Yearbook Edinburgh University Press 2020.

2015/16 Summer Scholar: Lucinda Bennett (MA 1st Class Honours): Outcomes:Bennett, L. and Robin Woodward (2017) ‘Cunning & Curated: Window at The University of Auckland’ Public Art Dialogue, 7, (1), 70-89. Woodward, R. L. and Nancy Keat (2018). ‘Auckland Council’s Vision for its Public art: A South Auckland Focus’. Kaitiaki The Journal of New Zealand Art History and Curatorship 1 (ISSN 0110-4888).

2017/2018 Summer Scholar Michael Irwin (MA 1st Class Honours) Outcomes: Woodward, R. L. ‘From the uttermost ends of the Earth’ Conference paper delivered at Le Quesnoy Centenary 1918-2018: France and New Zealand during the Great War, Le Quesnoy, France, 2-3 November 2018.Woodward, R. L. ‘War Memorials: Symbolism and Synecdoche’. Essay submitted and accepted for a collection of essays on commemorative art. ed. Natalie Philippe (University of Waikato. title tbc). 2018/2019 Summer Scholar: Mirabelle Field (completing MA in 2020): Outcomes: Woodward, R.L “The View from the Pacific: the Environmental Art of Lianne Edwards” presented at A Sea of Islands NZSA and the American College of Greece, Athens. 2-5 July 2019. Woodward, R.L “Environmental Public Art in New Zealand” presented at Nga Tutaki Encounter/s: Agency, Embodiment, Exchange, Ecologies AAANZ University of Auckland 3-6 December 2019.Woodward, R.L ‘Studio: Lianne Edwards’ Artnews Auckland (1500 words) Summer 2019 Woodward, R.L. ‘Environmental Public Art in New Zealand: Issues and Ethics’ Public Art Dialogue, Routledge 2019 Vol. 9, No. 2, 1–30 Summer Scholar: Alanna O’Riley. Woodward, R.L. “The Colonial Elephant in the Room: Michael Parekowhai’s The Lighthouse. (8000 words) Submitted to Public Art Dialogue Referred on for inclusion in an anthology proposed to Routledge by public art international specialists Cameron Cartiere and Anthony Scharag