Humanities

Engaging with Tāmaki Makaurau/ Auckland's Past

Supervisor

Prof Linda Bryder 

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART001

Three students requested.

Project

The students will assist to advance the goals of the Auckland History Initiative (AHI), located in History, School of Humanities. The AHI seeks to engage with and capture the historical and cultural development, the vibrancy and diversity of Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland and its importance to New Zealand life and beyond. Its aim is to reach beyond the University to build strong and enduring connections with Auckland’s many history and heritage institutions and communities and put Auckland’s history at the heart of an energetic conversation about our city. In collaboration with stakeholders including iwi, Council, central government agencies, the GLAM sector (galleries, libraries, archives and museums), research institutes and local historical societies, the AHI aims to ask searching questions about Auckland’s past to understand its present and future directions. The Summer Scholars will be part of that process.

Scholar’s Work

In order to help build an understanding of Auckland’s past in its multifaceted aspects, including urban, transnational, ethnic, cultural, social and environmental histories, the students will work jointly to seek out archival material relevant to the study of Auckland history. Preliminary meetings will be held with various sectors who have already indicated a willingness to participate in this programme. They include the Auckland City Council Heritage Unit, the Auckland City Library Research Centre, the Museum of Transport and Technology, and the Auckland War Memorial Museum (specifically its new Tamaki Galleries).

Each student will select a case study of their own choosing for which there is a set of archival records to draw on. They will spend the ten weeks of the Scholarship exploring these records to develop that case study. The outcome will be a series of short illustrated accounts that will appear on the AHI website (currently in development) and possibly a short talk to the staff members of the institution in which the archives are held.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Some historical training will be a pre-requisite along with basic computer skills. The students will not necessarily have already engaged with primary source material, but will have good analytical and writing skills.

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship

November to February

Emily Harris in New Zealand and Australia

Supervisor

Prof Michele Leggott

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART004

Project

I am preparing online editions of important primary material relating to New Zealand writer and artist Emily Cumming Harris (1837-1925). Very little is known about Harris’s early years in Taranaki, about the writing she did during the siege of New Plymouth in 1860 or about her time in Hobart and Melbourne 1861-65. An edition of Harris’s unpublished diaries 1885-86 and 1888-1891, with introduction and contextual notes, will extend what we know about the artist’s struggle to earn a living by means of teaching and painting in the late 19th century as women began to emerge from the rigid expectations of colonial life. The diaries form the basis for an extended investigation into the life and work of a woman who deserves to be better known for her contributions to current debates about creativity, gender and memory.

Scholar’s Work

The summer scholar will help research and write contextual notes for the editions and prepare clean copy for upload towards the end of the scholarship period. S/he will work alongside my small research team (research assistants Makyla Curtis and Betty Davis), who are developing the larger framework of my Harris project and whose experience to date with the data we have uncovered will give the scholar a head start on her/his tasks.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The summer scholar who joins my project should be excited about historical research and its impact on contemporary thinking. A knowledge of the role of archives and documentary record is essential, and someone who has completed English 718 Opening the Archive is well suited for the project. Students who have completed other archive research focussed papers across Arts are also welcome to apply.

Precise skills

  • locating, assessing and description of historical records
  • clear, analytical writing and note-taking
  • high-level copy editing and proofreading
  • ability to work as part of a research team

Timing/Weeks for Summer Scholarship

The scholar should be available to work agreed on hours each week from 2 Dec 2019 until 28 February 2020. Christmas / New Year holidays to be agreed on by mutual arrangement.

Gordon Walters: searching for an ideal

Supervisor

Assoc Prof Leonard Bell

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART006

Project

Preparation of the prefatory and concluding chapters for a book otherwise by Dr Francis Pound (1948-2017), left unfinished at his death. As his close friend and colleague Leonard Bell is writing the remaining chapters, as Francis Pound requested, to complete the book, so that it can be published, probably by the Auckland University Press. The Director, Sam Elworthy, is a strong supporter of the completion project. Gordon Walters (1919-1995) was one of New Zealand’s most outstanding and influential artists, a pioneer modernist and abstract painter, whose works are highly regarded both nationally and internationally. Francis Pound, over a period of twenty-five years, carried out more research on Walters’ work and career than anyone else. The completed book will be the most detailed and authoritative account of the complexities of Gordon Walters’ art. Leonard Bell has also researched and written about Walters’ art previously, most recently for the online periodical, CAA Review [College Art Association, USA] in 2018. He also contributed the Foreword to the publication accompanying the large exhibition, Walters En Abyme (Gus Fisher Gallery 2004), which Francis Pound curated. Francis Pound, then a Senior Lecturer in Art History at this university, wrote the primary long essay in that publication.

Scholar’s Work

To locate information and source materials necessary for the completion of the research for the chapters in the book on the art and career of Gordon Walters, and the collation of this information and material in an orderly manner. This would involve work in libraries and archives, in particular those of the University of Auckland, the Auckland Art Gallery and possibly Te Papa Tongarewa/Museum of New Zealand in Wellington.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The ability to do ‘detective work’: to locate information and source materials necessary for the completion of the research for the chapters of the book, as well as the ability to collate this information and material in orderly ways, thus enabling the efficient completion of the writing of the two chapters, as well as the footnotes and bibliography of the book as a whole.

Timing/Weeks

Weeks 1 – 4: 25 November – 20 December
Weeks 7 – 12: 13 January – 21 February

Ngā Mahi a Wharawhara / Māori Body Adornment: re-connecting global collections of taonga with whanau, hapū and iwi through digitisation

Supervisor

Dr Ngarino Ellis

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART012

Two Students requested.

Project

The Ngā Mahi a Wharawhara / Māori Body Adornment project aims to produce research on the history of Māori body adornment to the present day. This field is under-researched, and the project promotes the idea of a continuum of practice of Māori artists in relation to the use of materials, the changing technologies, and the ways in which adornment has been and continues to be integrated into the social, political, economic and cultural landscape of whānau, hapū and iwi.

While previous Summer Scholars have written a literature review on the topic (2017-8) and identified important taonga and collectors vis-a-vis the auction world (2018-9), the current application is for two scholars: the first will focus on identifying Maori adornments in museum collections overseas, their collectors, Māori patrons, and themes of circulation, the second scholar will identify suitable easy-access digital databases, identify Maori-centred taxonomies and then work alongside the first scholar in entering in some of the adornments from overseas to test how the system might work.

This current project builds on research by Arapata Hakiwai (‘Virtual repatriation: A database of Māori taonga in overseas museums,’ unpublished, 2012) and Wayne Ngata (‘Te Ataakura: Re-connecting voyage collections in archives and museums through the creation of digital taonga,’ published, 2010). Ultimately this project is written by, about and for Māori, and will contribute to a growing corpus of Māori art histories and Mātauranga Māori with the research goal of working towards reconnecting taonga with their whanau, hapū and iwi.

Scholars’ Work

This current scholarship will build on the two previous scholars' work on this project (2017-8, 2018-9), and in particular on one area from the 2018-9 scholarship: museum collections overseas. Many of these moved overseas before 1920 and remain unknown (adornments include those made from pounamu, wood, bone and stone; these include hei tiki, hei matau, kuru, kapeu, pekapeka, pōria, koropepe, rei puta, rei niho, as well as the containers they were kept in, waka huia and papahou). The remit for each scholar is as follows:

Scholar 1 will (a) identify, collate and organise by type and iwi/tribe (where possible) adornment in museum collections overseas; (b) identify and write up key collectors across collections; (c) identify and write up key Māori patrons, donors etc across collections; (d) identify themes in relation to the circulation of taonga during the 1770-1920 period.

Scholar 2 will identify and analyse free or low-cost digital databases, and select one in discussion with the supervisor to be used; identify Maori-centred taxonomies and matauranga for the entries, and then upload a selection of material from the first scholar into the chosen database, adding in also other information (eg about the collectors, and other provenance material) and links which may be relevant, eg to the museum.

The final report will present the Scholars’ findings:

Scholar 1: what kinds of adornments have moved out of Māori whānau and communities, and where have they ended up? Who are the collectors and dealers who are involved? Are there any adornments which have particularly important provenances?

Scholar 2: What are the opportunities and challenges of digital databases, both for the museum, and whānau, hapū and iwi? What kinds of access are available, and what are the ethics involved in relation to provenanced taonga (those with a known history) compared to unprovenanced? How might such a project proceed, and what kinds of funding opportunities might be available?

Research skills

  • Being able to identify important online and in-library sources, organise them into type and tribal affiliation, and maybe date, and synthesise them into an extended report.
  • PDF processing: scanning all relevant documents, particularly images of adornments.
  • Dropbox: where all the scanned documents and final Review will be stored.
  • Time management skills: they should be a self-starter, and able to work by themselves with the supervisor’s support.
  • A strong knowledge of Maori art and culture, language and tikanga, and will preferably be a graduate of my Art History course Mana Taonga: Tradition and Innovation in Maori Art.
  • A knowledge of art history. Ideally the student will also have their own or access to a laptop on which to work for the project.

Timing/Weeks

The project will stretch over the summer months beginning on 25 November 2019 and being completed by 21 February 2020. I will be co-located in Auckland for the duration of the project except for periods of statutory or annual leave; the latter I will inform the student about.

Texts of Terror: The Bible, Gender Violence, and Contemporary Crime Narratives

Supervisor

Dr Caroline Blyth

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART013

Project

Why have images of abused and violated women remained a ubiquitous part of the cultural imagination across space and time – from biblical traditions up to the present day? ‘Texts of Terror’ tackles this question, interrogating the incessant portrayal of gendered violence in both biblical and contemporary narratives. Specifically, it explores the intertextual connections between biblical texts and crime narratives (including crime fiction and drama, true crime podcasts and documentaries), investigating their mutual preoccupation with depictions of gender-based violence.

Using an intersectional feminist lens, this project analyses the rhetoric of gender-based violence evoked in these texts, uncovering the gendered discourses encoded within (verbal and visual) images of women’s murdered, missing, and violated bodies. What ideological and cultural rhetoric is inscribed on these women’s bodies, and how might this rhetoric either sustain or challenge popular (mis)understandings of gender-based violence?

Particular attention will be paid to the evocation of ‘missing white woman syndrome’ in crime narratives, where some women victims (young, white, upper/middle-class, heterosexual) are granted more attention and sympathy than others (women of colour, sex-workers, trans women, working-class women). The project explores how ‘missing white woman syndrome' shapes audiences’ understandings of and responses to gender-based violence in wider social contexts.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will be tasked with exploring and analysing depictions of gender violence in contemporary crime narratives, specifically crime drama (TV and film) and true crime (including podcasts and documentaries).

Their primary pieces of work will involve:

  • locating and analysing scholarly works and media sources (including news articles, blog posts, documentaries, etc.) that discuss gender violence in contemporary crime narratives, including the phenomenon of ‘missing white woman syndrome’. 
  • compiling an annotated bibliography (c.4000 words) of these sources, which will provide a synopsis of each source, as well as an overview of the central themes, approaches, and critical issues expressed therein. 
  • locating relevant crime drama and true crime texts that engage with or depict episodes of gender-based violence, and gathering these into a bibliography. 

The scholar will also have the opportunity to submit a short (c.1000-15000 word) blog post relating to their research for the Shiloh Project website.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The perfect summer scholar for this project will be passionate about investigating the ways that popular media might shape audiences’ understandings of gender-based violence. They will also share my commitment to creating academic research that serves as critic and conscience to communities beyond the confines of the University. More practically, the scholar will have excellent research and writing skills, which they are looking to develop further, and a competency in using library databases and web-based searches to find relevant material for their research. They should also be familiar with intersectional feminist approaches to textual analysis, and be able to use this methodology when studying various media forms (including academic writings, TV dramas.

Timing/Weeks

I will be available during January and February 2020.

Nurturing a National Literature: A comparative analysis of early-career literary awards and residencies in New Zealand and Scotland

Supervisor

Assoc Prof Paula Morris

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART014

Project

The research project is a collaboration between Assoc Prof Paula Morris and Professor Claire Squires at the University of Stirling. It will make a comparative analysis of two sets of early-career literary awards and residencies in New Zealand and Scotland. Scotland and New Zealand have similar-size populations, and in terms of the literary marketplace, have similar opportunities and challenges within the global Anglophone book market, with close neighbours which are dominant in publishing terms (i.e. England and Australia).

The research sets out to examine funding streams, key stakeholders and respective models of writer development, situating the prizes within their national context and cultural policy. It will also investigate impact on individual writers, writer cohorts, and broader writing culture in their respective countries. We’re working towards an understanding of how creativity in the literary sector can be stimulated, supported and enhanced through early-career recognition and/or intervention.

Scholar’s Work

Primary research for this project on the New Zealand side includes gathering comprehensive information on awards, residencies, grants and prizes for early-career writers of fiction, creative nonfiction and/or poetry. This will involve research into university prizes like the Sir James Wallace Creative Writing Prize (Auckland) or the Adam Prize (Wellington); the mentoring schemes run by the Māori Literature Trust and the NZ Society of Authors; emerging-writer residencies offered by the Michael King Writers Centre; and the emerging-writer-specific Creative New Zealand grants – over the past eight years.

The scholar will work on this fundamental information-gathering, as well as writing a report on the publication/awards path of writers who have received such support in New Zealand. A number of articles are planned around this project for international journals, and it’s possible the scholar can contribute towards these. Required

Skills/Pre-requisites

The scholar should have strong organisation and research skills, and be thorough, as well as be able to use initiative and judgment. The scholar should be a strong, clear writer. An interest in contemporary literature, creative writing and the literary sector would be useful.

Timing/Weeks

I am flexible about the ten-week period depending on the scholar’s own schedule, though I would prefer to start in late November. Professor Squires and I will be working closely on this project in November and December.

New Zealanders on the international stage

Supervisor

Dr Robin Woodward 

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART017

Project

This project examines sculpted and painted portraits of New Zealanders who made a name for themselves internationally during the twentieth century. It focuses particularly on expatriates who settled or lived in Britain for a significant length of time and considers them in the context of images of their peers which were made at the same time or have been created posthumously. Amongst the visual artists, writers and others who established themselves overseas, Frances Hodgkins and Katherine Mansfield immediately come to mind. So too does Sir Keith Park and his defence role in the Battle of Britain. Sculptor Anthony Stones carved out a niche in both England and New Zealand, Dan Davin was at Oxford, so was John Mulgan. Preliminary scoping has revealed that there are painted and sculpted portraits of many of these figures.How might these be contextualised in comparison to portraits of their colleagues and friends? Katherine Mansfield and the Bloomsbury group are of particular interest. Preliminary research also suggests that a number of such works may have been ‘lost’ or have gone missing after being accessioned into a collection. This aspect will also be examined. What are the true circumstances behind this situation, and is the documentation accurate?

Scholar’s Work

The Summer Scholar will research portraits of New Zealand expatriates, with an initial focus on writers and visual artists who established themselves in Great Britain. These will be contextualised through a comparison with portraits of other members of their artistic or intellectual circles. The first task will be to identify the existence of works in this subject area and then to undertake research into the provenance of the works. Works will need to be documented and analysed. Reasons behind the commissions or selection of the subjects need to be ascertained using both primary and secondary sources. From this, details around sources and subject matter should become evident and offer avenues for continuing investigation and discovery of further works. Anecdotal evidence suggests that there are works which have been lost or have disappeared from accession lists. The Scholar will follow up this line of investigation particularly in relation to sculpture. A data base will be established from which patterns can be identified. Findings will be written up in draft form in preparation for publication.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

The Summer Scholar will need to have a strong knowledge of New Zealand art and preferably a specific background in sculpture. S/he will need strong skills of visual analysis and have the ability to contextualise individual works. As there will be a component of contact with gallerists, archivists and librarians, the Summer Scholar must have excellent people skills and an ability to work with people from a range of backgrounds. Meticulous attention to detail is needed for cataloguing works. An ability to think laterally will be necessary particularly in the preliminary stages of this research when a data base is being established. Knowledge of eHive would be helpful. Previous experience of researching and analysing New Zealand sculpture would be beneficial. The scholar should have demonstrated the ability to undertake a literature review as a base line for this project. A proven ability to contextualize specific artworks is necessary. The Scholar will have strong academic research and writing skills.

Timing/Weeks

I will be in Auckland and available to supervise from November to March. The exact weeks will be determined in consultation with the student but will include most of the following:

25 Nov-29 Nov. 2-6 Dec. 9-13 Dec. 16-20 Dec. 6-10 Jan. 13-17 Jan. 20-24 Jan. 28-31 Jan (short week, Auckland Anniversary 27 Jan ) 3-7 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 6 Feb). 10-14 Feb. 17-21 Feb.

Teaching Oceanic Literature: A Global Study

Supervisor

Assoc Prof Selina Tusitala Marsh 

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART021

Project

Lead Pasifika Researcher with Dr Tina Makereti as Lead Maori Researcher (Massey University) in a Marsden project titled ‘Teaching Oceanic Literature: A Global Study’. We envision this as a book for use in curricula where indigenous literatures from Oceania (writers with genealogical links to Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia, in the region and also living in diaspora) are taught, or could be taught. We are in the early stages of putting a proposal together for a February 2020 submission. The study will initially be confined to universities throughout the globe teaching this material but aims to also appeal to high school curricula. A stream of this investigation includes website resources and online learning platforms. In that vein, updating the New Zealand National Poet Laureate website (2017-19) convened by myself and hosted by the National Library towards developing curricula content is required.

Scholar’s Work

  • Update my own survey of current universities teaching Oceanic or Pacific Literature which includes documentation of key contacts (lecturers), authors and texts currently being taught
  • Produce a master spreadsheet of findings, (depending upon skillset) research the possibilities of making a a digital map of Oceania incorporating the information above
  • Locate any published pedagogical practices by these practitioners
  • Produce a literature review of materials on Pacific and/or Oceanic pedagogical practices, this may extend to documented Indigenous pedagogical practices
  • Produce a literature reviews of current Pacific Research Methodologies and Models
  • Produce a Master working document of the Pasifika elements of the Marsden Project that can be regularly updated (this might be a flexible digital mind map)
  •  Working closely with me to update the NZ Poet Laureate website – going through archival material, selecting and preparing material for posting in chronological order (approx. 13 posts representing 13 months), with a view to providing curricula content for schools and universities

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

It would be advantageous if the student has:

  • Some background in Postcolonial, New Zealand or Pacific Literature and/or Pacific Studies and/or Maori Studies
  • Experience in working with spreadsheets, digital mind-mapping, and organising large amounts of information in clear, logical formats where information is easy to retrieve

Project would suit someone who is a visual thinker, is highly organised, self-directed, and tenacious (in following up loose ends) with excellent communication skills.

Timing/Weeks

25 Nov-29 Nov. 2-6 Dec. 9-13 Dec. 16-20 Dec. 6-10 Jan. 13-17 Jan. 20-24 Jan. 28-31 Jan (short week, Auckland Anniversary 27 Jan). 3-7 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 6 Feb). 10-14 Feb. 17-21 Feb.

A survey of major exhibitions in public galleries and museums in the period 1985-2015

Supervisor

Assoc Prof Linda Tyler

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART033

Project

This project will document the major changes which took place in New Zealand public galleries and museums in the period 1985-2015, which has been characterised as the period in which public culture in institutions took an “educational turn”. This was the era in which substantial public funding was accorded for exhibitions to mark the Sesquicentennial of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1990 and the anniversary of women’s suffrage in 1993. From being collections-based, galleries and museums began looking for opportunities to draw large crowds with blockbuster exhibitions. Additionally new buildings for the Waikato Museum of Art and History (1987), Dunedin Public Art Gallery (1997), Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (1998), Christchurch Art Gallery (2003) occasioned major restaging of of narratives of art history and settlement in collaboration with other institutions (for example Dream Collectors at Te Papa (1998).

Scholar’s Work

  • Gather documentation and reviews from six main institutions on 12 key exhibitions
  • Co-author a journal article on the period for publication in Kaitiaki: the journal of art history and curatorship

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

Stage 3 Art History or Museums and Cultural Heritage (HUMS 300 Critiquing the Museum).

Timing/Weeks

25 Nov-29 Nov - survey catalogues and document
2-6 Dec – survey catalogues and document
9-13 Dec – collate reviews and responses to exhibitions
16-20 Dec- collate reviews and responses to exhibitions
6-10 Jan – prepare paper for submission to Kaitiaki journal of art history and curatorship
13-17 Jan – prepare paper for submission to Kaitiaki.
20-24 Jan – submit paper and organise illustrations and permissions
28-31 Jan (short week, Auckland Anniversary 27 Jan) – continue permission process
3-7 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 6 Feb)
10-14 Feb – work using exhibition files at AAG Eric McCormick Library on 200 Years of New Zealand Landscape Art
7-21 Feb – work using exhibition files at Auckland Museum on 1990 exhibitions

Agencies of Kindness

Supervisor

Dr Emma Willis

Discipline

Humanities

Project code: ART035

Project

Agencies of Kindness is an interdisciplinary research group sponsored by the Faculty of Arts with participation from across the University. The collaborative project responds to the currency that the concept of kindness has in the contemporary political environment. We aim to consider how a politics of kindness, broadly conceived, might be taken up across a wide variety of areas, both within and outside of the University. We are especially focused on the particularities of the Aotearoa context, and in the power of concepts such as manaakitanga and atawhai as points of social orientation and commitment. The research asks how kindness might promote social transformation at both the individual and institutional level, and in how networks of kindness might build resilience.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar will principally contribute to the creation of an annotated bibliography surveying scholarly works related to the subject of kindness, with a particular focus on the broad disciplines of humanities, education, creative practice and social sciences. The scholar will seek out works across journals, edited collections, monographs and online publications as well as attending to relevant performing arts works. The scholar will also work with the supervisor to collate and summarize the research findings from a series of symposia held throughout 2019. From both of these tasks, the scholar will work with the supervisor to begin to develop a lexicon of kindness-in-action that draws from the various disciplines surveyed. The research will require a combination of analytical care and imaginative thinking.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

  • A broad-based understanding of research methods in humanities and/or social sciences
  • Experience in summarizing research articles
  • Strong academic writing skills
  • Basic understanding of Te Ao Māori would be desirable. 

Timing/Weeks

6-10 Jan, 13-17 Jan, 20-24 Jan, 28-31 Jan (short week, Auckland Anniversary 27 Jan), 3-7 Feb (short week, Waitangi Day 6 Feb), 10-14 Feb, 17-21 Feb, 24-28 Feb.

Buffalo Bill in Germany: The William F. Cody Digital Archive

Supervisor

Dr Nicole Perry
Assoc Prof Jennifer Frost

Discipline

Cultures, Languages and Linguistics; Humanities

Project code: ART034

Project

The William F. Cody Archive is a digital archive that focusses on the life and times of one of the greatest American entertainers of the late 19th Century. Known around the world as Buffalo Bill, William F. Cody created an entertainment empire, which included some of the greatest performers from the American West and worldwide.

This project is responsible for the collection and interpretation of material on Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show in Germany and Central Europe from 1890-1906. The shows were enormously successful and Buffalo Bill was able to bring to his audiences an American Wild West that was both nostaglic and exotic, with the German audience members showing particular interest in the North American Indigenous performers. Consequently, this project is also associated with the “Disentangling the European Gaze” research hub in the Arts Faculty. At a time of heightened nationalistic tensions both in America and Europe, this project both examines and situates Cody’s influence and the influence and contributions of the Wild West to American nationalism at home and abroad.

Scholar’s Work

The scholar’s work will consist of transcribing and translating a collection of German newspaper articles from 1890-1910 reporting on Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show and the tours in German speaking countries and providing explanatory footnotes on the articles and the shows. The scholar will also contribute to a database on German writers from 1800-1890 who wrote about the American West. If there is interest on the part of the scholar, the scholar can also explore the creation and use of the digital archives.

Required Skills/Pre-requisites

An excellent knowledge of German and English is required, together with translation skills. The scholar would have to have Stage III German (or excellent grades in Stage II) with a near native speaker command of English. Although a background in digital humanities is not required, it would be considered an asset.

Timing/Weeks

The supervisors are flexible and are willing to start in November and end early February.