Doctoral study in History

Why study with us?

We were placed in the top 100 in the QS World Rankings by Subject 2018.

As a doctoral candidate, you'll benefit from financial support for research expenses through PReSS funding, high calibre supervision practices and the networks and expertise of our world-class academic researchers.

Research opportunities

We welcome PhD research proposals in areas such as:

  • Māori history
  • Twentieth-century New Zealand cultural history
  • Empire and travel writing; settler cultures in New Zealand, Canada and Australia
  • Australian history, including colonial and rural histories
  • Social and cultural history of religion in late antiquity and the early middle ages
  • The Anglo-Norman period (11th and 12th centuries)
  • The early modern history of ideas, including political thought and science; seventeenth century Britain
  • The history of sexuality and of gender
  • The history of medicine, in New Zealand, Britain and Japan
  • The history of war, peace and internationalism in the modern period
    Tokugawa Japan; life courses of men and women
  • Twentieth century United States history, popular culture, social movements, women’s history, labour history
  • Irish history, especially the history of migration
  • Environmental, maritime and oceanic history
  • Transnational and comparative histories

Our people

Academic staff in History are active, widely-published researchers known nationally and internationally for their expertise in a variety of historical fields. Since 1980, History staff members have published well over 100 books and many articles and reviews.

Current staff include Professor Barry Reay, holder of the Keith Sinclair Chair in History, Professor Linda Bryder and Professor Jonathan Scott.

Past research topics

Scholarships and awards

Help and advice

For help with enrolling in your PhD you can contact the Arts Students' Centre.

If you would like to discuss your plans for your doctoral research you can contact our PhD Adviser.

Apply for doctoral study