LAW 121G Law and Society

LAW 121G | ARTS, BE, EDSW, EMHSS, LC | Semester One & Two 2022 | City Campus | 15 points

Description

An introduction to theories of the nature, functions and origins of law and legal systems, including sources of law; comparative concepts of law; an overview of constitutional and legal arrangements in New Zealand, including the role of the courts; the operation of the legal system in historical and contemporary New Zealand with a focus on concepts of property rights, the Treaty of Waitangi, Treaty Settlements and proposals for constitutional change.

Note: Does not meet the General Education requirement for LLB, LLB(Hons), LLB conjoint or LLB(Hons) conjoint degrees.

Restriction: LAW 101

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Understand how the legal system in Aotearoa New Zealand works.
  2. Understand Maori worldviews and the place of te Tiriti o Waitangi and the Treaty of Waitangi in the Aotearoa New Zealand legal system.
  3. Understand some of the historical, political and international forces that have shaped and influenced the Aotearoa New Zealand legal system. 
  4. Critically assess the Aotearoa New Zealand legal system and offer informed opinions on how it operates, its strengths and its weaknesses.
  5. Provide well-founded thoughts and analysis on an array of contemporary and historic legal matters of significance to Aotearoa New Zealand.
  6. Identify, explain and evaluate possible future directions for the Aotearoa New Zealand constitution and legal system.
  7. Write coherent and well-reasoned essays.

Student Feedback

'The content of the course was very interesting and the lectures were very useful and easy to understand.'

'The course was very interesting and intellectually stimulating. It has a very clear outline in the syllabus and some very well selected and current readings included with the course materials.'

'The lecturers notes and lectures were top quality.'

'An incredible lecturer with amazing experience and background to hold the classes attention.'

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