Carrie Bryers

Carrie Bryer's (Ngā Puhi) Master of Public Health thesis looks at the insights from Māori students and whānau and examines current perspectives and practices of the Whakapiki Ake Project.

“I had recently graduated from a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBChB) and had returned home to Northland to work with my people.

“Working as a house surgeon, I began to see preventable causes for the poor health state of the people in my community and I began to ask the ‘why’ questions.

“I soon realised that my career as a doctor could not just start when people arrive through the hospital doors. I wanted to make a difference before it got to that point.

I soon realised that my career as a doctor could not just start when
people arrive through the hospital doors. I wanted to make a difference
before it got to that point.

Carrie Bryers Master of Public Health

“I decided to pursue postgraduate study in Public Health through the Master of Public Health.

“Since commencing my training an entire new perspective on health has unfolded – one that could not be learned from inside the hospital setting or from a clinical textbook. Rather, it relies on connecting the dots between politics, infrastructure, environmental challenges, historical influences and emerging disease – to name a few.

“My dissertation is a qualitative study looking at the insights from Māori students and whānau and examining current perspectives and practices of the Whakapiki Ake Project.

“Currently, Māori health professionals represent only a small portion of New Zealand’s workforce. It is my hope that this research will contribute to increasing access for Māori into health careers.”